Jump to content
SASS Wire Forum

Recommended Posts

 What are you using for a long range rifle I have the opportunity to get a 4570 with a 32 inch barrel at a good price just wonder if it would be a good choice for long  have the opportunity to get a 4570 with a 32 inch barrel at a good price just wondering if it would be a good choice for  long-range cowboy shooting 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What rifle?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What type of action is that 45-70?   A lever gun with a 32" barrel will be very heavy and long, requiring a lot of strength to shoot well.   In a single shot design, that length is still long enough to let you know it's got a long, heavy barrel.   Of course, most long barrels can be cut down to a shorter length if desired.

 

First thing is you ought to consider - how good is your eyesight.   If you can't shoot other rifles unless they have a scope on them, you won't be able to shoot long range well without a scope, most likely.   There usually is a category for rifles with "period" scope tubes, beware they are also heavy and expensive.

 

If you still see sharply at distance, great.  The tang mounted peep sights (very many designs) are the most accurate on a gun.  Barrel mounted open sights - less accurate at distance.

 

Second thing is how accustomed to heavy recoil in a rifle you are.  Even a light 45-70 load has more recoil than folks who are "maxed out" with the recoil of a cowboy main match gun can handle.   A light .45-70 load kicks me about the same as a factory 30-06.  Such folks may do much better with a .38-55 or even a .30-30 for long range, although the .30-30 usually runs out of steam past 200 yards or so.

 

What do I shoot?  Either a Marlin 1895 lever in .45-70, with 26" barrel, or a Winchester Falling Block (1885) Italian made clone with a 30" barrel, also in 45-70.   But I handle recoil pretty well, and have good upper body strength, and can see 20-20 with corrections in my glasses.

 

Third - Consider where would you shoot, both practice and long range matches.  Lots of folks get a long range rifle, and peddle it off after a year or so because they just have no place to practice or shoot matches. 

 

A cheaply bought gun that you can't or won't shoot is not much of a bargain.  If you have the drive to be a long-range shooter, this may be the deal of a lifetime.   It's up to you and your circumstances!

 

Good luck, GJ

 

 

 

 

Edited by Garrison Joe, SASS #60708
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Joe that’s great info didn’t think about it that way but it’s a sharps 45/70  I may just leave it alone and get something else . 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Uberti 1874 "Long Range" Sharps .45-70, 34" barrel. I have others, including a very nice Shiloh, but the Uberti actually shoots a bit better.

 

For long range lever action, I normally use a Winchester "Legendary Frontiersman" .38-55.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With regard to .45-70 and recoil, the first gun I got in this caliber was an 1884 Springfield Trapdoor rifle.   I loaded up some trapdoor safe ammo and it shot well out of this gun.   Then I got an 1873 Trapdoor Carbine and an 1886 Winchester with a 20" octagon barrel.  Out of both of these guns that same loading was very punishing in the recoil department.


So, I switched powders to Trailboss.  Loaded up some trapdoor safe loads and it is very pleasant to shoot both of the lighter guns now.  And they will still reach out an touch a target a good long distance away.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Since "Long Range" for my eyesight is 100 yards or less, my "Long Range" rifle is an H & R Handi rifle chambered for 38-55.  Gets it done nicely.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have long range lever guns in .45-70 and .38-55 ....

But for real long Range I use a Uberti Highwall in .40-65 ,,, with bullets in the 370 - 416 grain range ....

This works great out Past 1,300 yards....

 

Jabez Cowboy

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What do you call "long range"?

Will you be using BP?

Any barrel longer than 30" is front heavy for off-hand shooting 

Really need more info.

OLG 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thats a great rifle - if you get it at a decent price it is a win/win in your favor , you get a fine rifle and you get one that will serve for long range just fine , then you need to work up loads for it , great fun , 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a Winchester 86 45-70, A Winchester 94 38-55 and I looking at another

 

Then I have a Pedrosali (can't spell it) Boss Sharps 45-120 

 

And a Browning Highwall 45-90 

 

All shoot better than I can

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't know what the great price is on the gun you speak of, but I have a Browning BPCR 45-70 that I've never fired that I am considering listing. Had two of them, and the one I used was a excellent gun. The 45-70 is proofed for Smokeless powder too. They are not cheap, but they are a premium rifle with Bull Barrel and decent Soule type factory sights. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It depends on what you call “long range”.  At some matches “long range” is not more than 300 yards (which is really the short end of mid-range).  And, at others, its more like 500 to 1000 yards.  The more accomplished shooters will go with a larger diameter and heavier bullet for the longer distances.  The reason, WIND!  It is easier for the wind to push a smaller, lighter, faster bullet than a big slower heavier bullet.  Also study up on the effects of spin drift and how will the wind interacts with the spin of the bullet.

 

 

The 45-70 is a great round to start out with.  It works well with both black powder and smokeless.  Lots of easy to get components and bullet molds.  Lots of folks will recommend smaller rounds for shorter distances, but, just remember, the 45-70 also works great at the shorter distances.  And it has the added benefit of working well at the longer distances.  I have both a 40-65 and a 45-70.  If the wind is blowing and/or the distances are more than 500 yards, I shoot my 45-70 every time.  The 40-65 begins to wonder around some by the time it gets to the 600 yard mark and it just gets worse from there on out.  While the 40-65 will travel great distances, it can not be relied upon to be a consistent hitter at very far targets.  If you are target shooting, then buy a target weight rifle.  Combo rifles for both hunting and target shooting do a poor job at either task.

 

 

The next thing you need to think about is sighting.  DON’T buy cheap sights.  I would rather have a lower quality rifle and very high-quality Soule sight than the other way around.  MVA, Balwin, Kelley all make great Soule sights.  Get a globe front sight (with level). 

 

 

There is no substitute for trigger time.  These long range rifles are just like any other rifle, they have their likes and dislikes for powder and bullets.  Shoot it with different loads, it will tell you what it likes.  Don’t relay 100 yard target results.  Test the rifle at a minimum of 300 yards.  Variances in bullet speed are easier to spot when shooting at far targets.  If have a chronograph, clock the bullets speed and look for a load that is very speed consistent from shot to shot.  Once you have found a consistent load, shoot the rifle a lot in different weather conditions and RECORD the conditions for each distance in a record book, along with sight settings.  Then, using the recorded data as guide, all you have to do is dial in the sight setting and impress a lot of other shooters when you hit the target with your first shot.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you have to start somewhere if your going to do this at all , give it a go , if you decide its not for you - you have a wonderful rifle and a great experience , nothing to lose but pride and as long as you are doing what you want thats not the factor that counts , just do it and enjoy the journey , we only go round once in this life , 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lots of great information and advice here!  I concur with Clyde Henry and the Watab Kid, in particular.  Having spent the past 20 years or so working for a variety of firearms manufacturers', I can attest to the finickiness of rifle barrels.  Two consecutive barrels made on the same day, from the same blanks, on the same machine, by the same person, may not shoot to the same degree of accuracy with any given loading.  So as several here have stated, take the time to work-up and experiment with as many loadings as is feasible, document the results, then you will truly realize the accuracy potential of your rifle.  After that, there is no substitute for trigger time.  I've rarely met a shooter who could out-shoot the gun.  And to expound on the Watab Kid, you have to start somewhere; but that doesn't mean you have to limit yourself.  Great thing about all of this is: "You don't have to stick to just one gun."  You can always trade-up or trade-off; or simply buy another and start from scratch with a new experiment.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.