Jump to content
SASS Wire Forum
Sign in to follow this  
Subdeacon Joe

'61 Nash

Recommended Posts

https://www.thedrive.com/news/31682/1961-nash-metropolitan-with-8-8-liter-big-block-v-8-is-more-engine-than-car?fbclid=IwAR2lxPsAEPqNs03abTfBzueVfxQV5Uvu0VRi0SUg6ekGROmcTiptgCW0zHA

https%3A%2F%2Fapi.thedrive.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2019%2F12%2F236023_Front_3-4_Web.jpg%3Fquality%3D85?w=1440&auto=compress%2Cformat&ixlib=js-1.4.1&s=dd858dee03be6dfd9afd7b89412d2afb

 

Nash Metropolitans are known for being one of the smallest cars America ever produced in large numbers. They come in at about six inches shorter and four inches narrower than a first-generation Mazda Miata, which ought to give you an idea of the scale we're talking about. Though their sub-1,800-pound curb weights meant they offered surprising performance for cars that came with just 42 horsepower, Metropolitans were anything but fast; they took more than 19 seconds to break 60 miles per hour, and would kick and scream all the way to their top speeds of 75 mph.

https%3A%2F%2Fs3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com
BARRETT-JACKSON

Chevy Big Block-Swapped, 8.8-Liter V-8 Nash Metropolitan

 

But those are problems an engine swap can easily solve and in this case, the solution is an 8.8-liter (540 cubic-inch), big-block Chevrolet V-8. Augmented with a ram-air intake, Pro Comp aluminum cylinder heads, and custom, fender-exist exhausts, this gargantuan engine produces an equally swole 620 horsepower according to Hagerty. As the Metropolitan's original three-speed manual and rear axle aren't up to taking that kind of beating, they were upgraded to a drag racing-grade Turbo-Hydramatic 400 three-speed automatic and a Ford "nine-inch" truck differential, with a short 4.10 final drive to maximize acceleration. Monstrous rear tires, a much-needed wheelie bar, and a drag chute complete its transformation into a Pee-wee Herman-worthy drag car.

 

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The guy that owned the American Motors dealership lived across the street from us, and gave Dad good deals, so I grew up in a series of Hudsons and Ramblers.  A 1960 Rambler American got me through 5 years of college and my first year of employment.  It was a tough little car.  I sold it to a co-worker. His kids were driving it when they got T-boned by a driver who ran a red light.  They survived without a scratch.  Uni-Body construction paid off that day.

 

The reclining seats were cool.  :)

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, J-BAR #18287 said:

The guy that owned the American Motors dealership lived across the street from us, and gave Dad good deals, so I grew up in a series of Hudsons and Ramblers.  A 1960 Rambler American got me through 5 years of college and my first year of employment.  It was a tough little car.  I sold it to a co-worker. His kids were driving it when they got T-boned by a driver who ran a red light.  They survived without a scratch.  Uni-Body construction paid off that day.

 

The reclining seats were cool.  :)

Moms wouldn't let their daughters go out with boys who drove Ramblers

  • Like 3
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Forty Rod SASS 3935 said:

Moms wouldn't let their daughters go out with boys who drove Ramblers


Some did!  :D

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Beep beep. Beep beep. His horn went beep beep beep.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here ya go, Alpo...!  :rolleyes:

 

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My first car was a '58 Rambler Rebel with a nice V8 and overdrive. The first time I pulled the lever for the lay back seats with my girlfriend she popped back up and greeted me with a haymaker punch. That wasn't always the case later on. When I went to college, guys in the dorm wanted to rent it for date nights.

  • Like 3
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

image.png.cb4cded84aaa09ee748e84ff2d799fd2.pngI learned to drive stick shift on one like this only it was white! It was the old neighbor's next door, my dad wanted me to learn to drive stick even though we had an automatic! I loved the Rambler!!!

Edited by Rye Miles #13621
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First car I bought new was a '62 Rambler Classic station wagon, with push-button automatic tranny, and the fold down seats!  At 16,000 miles the head of the in-line six cracked across the #3 cylinder!  Fortunately, they had the 3 -year, 36,000 mile warranty in effect.  Car would hardly get out of its own way, but served its purpose through graduation from college.  Used to haul the AFROTC Cadet rifle team around to various intercollegiate smallbore matches.  Traded it on a new Ford Ranch Wagon Special (Country Sedan less the simulated wood panels, and in Air Force blue, it turned out!  Got married not long after, so didn't need the seats! :rolleyes:

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Back in the late 60's, a friend of mine entered a demolition derby at a local county fair. He had a mid 60's Rambler if I remember correctly. Most of the entries were large sedans or station wagons, e.g. Caddy's, Lincoln's, Ford's, etc. Since this was just a small county fair and the entrants were local boys, the track was heavily wetted down to minimize hard crashes. Well, the rambler was so light, that whenever it was hit, it would slide across the mud with little damage. He lasted quite awhile until two participants ganged up on him where one would pin him and the other would smash into him!

 

I entered a '56 Dodge with a hemi and was eliminated when my motor mounts broke, the engine overheated and seized.:angry:

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Once when my '58 Rambler was getting some work done on it , the loaner they gave me to use had an "E" type transmission. You still shifted 3 on the tree but there was no clutch. Also had early form of cruise control. You set a moveable wiper arm thingy on the speedometer for the speed you wanted and when engaged it would get you there fast - even from a dead stop or close to it. It was exciting!

  • Like 2
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.