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Matthew Duncan

Uberti Model P - getting tired

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After 20 some years my Uberti Model P revolvers (45 Colt) are getting tired and a bit worn.  Trigger pull is getting too lite.  I'm mechanically incline so any recommendations on how I can increase the amount of trigger pounds that is required to fire the revolver?

 

I'm a bit soured on taking them to a Gun smith.  Last time I did to fix Uberti's Gorilla stripping threads the GS solution was to drowned the parts in red locktite which didn't last for the first stage.

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If the screw that holds the trigger tension spring is long enough you can make a spring booster by using a piece of #32 piano wire to add on top of the existing spring.

kR

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I'd start with a new set of springs.

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PM Sent

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Also take a critical look at top of trigger and sear notch.  If rounded or otherwise worn off,  maybe time to replaced. 

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Posted (edited)

Take off the grips.   If the big screw that holds the hammer spring against the frame is loose, tighten it.   You'll have to take the backstrap off it to it.

Edited by H. K. Uriah, SASS #74619
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Posted (edited)

I second what Warden said.  Look at the trigger sear for wear and replace the trigger if need be.  Also look at the hammer cam for wear as well the hammer may need to be replaced too.   I would  also just replace the bolt trigger spring too while the guns apart.  I think VTI still sells the old hammers and triggers, act fast they’re goin quick.

Edited by Ridge

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On 1/1/2020 at 6:17 PM, H. K. Uriah, SASS #74619 said:

Take off the grips.   If the big screw that holds the hammer spring against the frame is loose, tighten it.   You'll have to take the backstrap off it to it.

 

Just got back to this project.  Hammer spring screw was tight.

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On 1/1/2020 at 2:53 PM, Goody, SASS #26190 said:

I'd start with a new set of springs.

 

New Trigger bolt springs ordered.  Main Spring was a 3rd party.  I'll put the original back in.

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On 1/1/2020 at 3:41 PM, Timothy said:

id put a new trigger in first it might just turn out perfect.

 

I had a new trigger in my spare parts bag.  Compared the used with the new and they look identical, nice sharp crisp edges.

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On 1/1/2020 at 3:17 PM, Warden Callaway said:

Also take a critical look at top of trigger and sear notch.  If rounded or otherwise worn off,  maybe time to replaced. 

 

Believe you may have nailed it.  There isn't much of a third notch left on the hammer.  Trigger isn't worn and fits snugly in hammer notches one and two.  At $93 per Hammer I'll cross my fingers and replace the springs first.

 

Would anyone provide a close up picture of a known good hammer?

Edited by Matthew Duncan

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hammer can be recut if the notch is worn.  should be recased where cut with Kasenit or something similar.  Best done on a jig or by someone that has done a bunch of them.

 

Edited by J. Mark Flint #31954 LIFE
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2 hours ago, J. Mark Flint #31954 LIFE said:

hammer can be recut if the notch is worn.  should be recased where cut with Kasenit or something similar.  Best done on a jig or by someone that has done a bunch of them.

 

 

I had a second generation Colt SAA hammer welded and recut and new cam installed and fitted to the action.  Cost $220 +/- . 

 

A new Uberti hammer would be cheaper.  

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Found a picture of what the hammer notches should look like.  Close to a 45 degree bevel.  Mine is more like a straight 90 degrees.

 

image.png.585067422d2e1f6c6e0a038f585cb4da.png

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While it may need rewelding, it often does not if you replace the trigger with one that is taller than what is in it.  220 to rework a colt hammer with a new or repaired cam and trigger notch might be a little high, but simply fitting a new trigger, recutting and hardening it should be considerably less.  If it is flat and it wasn't altered that way, the hardening on the hammer wasn't good in the first place.

 

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Coyote Moon quickly found the problem.  It was the worn third notch on the hammers.  He applied his expertise and the trigger pulls went from less then a pound to averages of 3 1/2 pounds.  Revolvers are good for another 20 years IMHO. 

 

Revolvers are back in the safe waiting for the first match in April.

Edited by Matthew Duncan
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1 hour ago, Matthew Duncan said:

...Revolvers are back in the safe waiting for the first match in April.

 

 

Wait a minute, you're not going to be dry-firing them 500 times every day?

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 I would go to the range and check them out (maybe 25 rounds through each revolver), rather than getting into a match and finding there is still a problem. 

 

Cat Brules

 

Cat Brules.

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