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Teak Oil For Gun Stock Refinishing


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It would work fine, and is actually a pretty decent finish. It actually has nothing to do with teak. It falls into the category of a wiping varnish similar to danish oil, Formby’s tungboil finish, and a number of other wood finishes. They are a mix of Linseed and/or Tung oil, mineral spirits, and a varnish of some type. 

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Yes, Formby's brand on two Uberti 1873 rifles.  I was quite happy with the results

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I did try it but wasn't too pleased with the result. It does penetrate, but seems to evaporate.

 

I want a good result without putting in silly effort. The best lazy method I found was a coat or several of tung oil. Normal sand with fine in between coats. When ready a quick thin coat of Tru-oil. About an 80 to 90% job with about half the work. During WWII, one thick coat of Tung and it was out of the armoury. Tung oil doesn't soften like linseed in the heat. 

 

Tru-oil is too spendy to use for the whole job, and it doesn't soak in as well. Perfect for a top coat. 

 

Oil soaked stock, acetone. Acetone is a good solvent, sucks the goo out of the wood.  Again, down and dirty prep. Also dries out the wood so glue can do it's job. 

 

BB

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Big Boston,

 

You hit the practice I have used for over 50 years of stock work.

 

The Tru-Oil top coat does seal and protect better than Tung or Teak oil.

The Tung and, better yet, Teak oil is best for soaking the wood.

 

Your mileage and finish may vary!!

 

Ol'  #4

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I’ve done a lot of teak oil work on my saltwater spearguns.  Works well in the ocean.  For firearms and knife handles I prefer Tru-Oil.  Start with the liquid from the bottle, let dry, then hit it with a light 1000 grit sandpaper scuff, then finish with spray can Tru-Oil.  Nice, smooth, and durable finish.

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Wait wait wait ... Tru-Oil is "too spendy"?  $7 for a 3 oz bottle that will last for dozens of stock finishing projects is "too spendy"?

 

Look at the stock refinishing job I did in the thread 

Each coat used just a few drops of Tru-Oil applied with a finger.  Big Boston, you must be using it wrong.

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That guy has a lot of good videos on finishing, and can link to a bunch of other options. Most of the sold as special gunstock finishes are just variations on oil varnish or wiping varnishes. Just put in a smaller container and crank up the price. 

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9 minutes ago, Buckshot Sheridan said:

That guy has a lot of good videos on finishing, and can link to a bunch of other options. Most of the sold as special gunstock finishes are just variations on oil varnish or wiping varnishes. Just put in a smaller container and crank up the price. 

Yup.  Tru-Oil is cheap and "tried and tru" so to speak.  I guess folks don't want to use it because ... I don't know, it takes time, care, effort, multiple coats, with different types of sanding and buffing between coats?  It definitely isn't a quick fix for an ugly stock, but you can get anything from a durable natural looking finish to a mirror-like high-gloss finish with it -- it just depends on what you're after, and how much time and effort you want to devote to the project.  Lots of good YouTubes on how to use it.  This is one of my favorites: 

 

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59 minutes ago, Nostrum Damus SASS #110702 said:

Yup.  Tru-Oil is cheap and "tried and tru" so to speak.  I guess folks don't want to use it because ... I don't know, it takes time, care, effort, multiple coats, with different types of sanding and buffing between coats?  It definitely isn't a quick fix for an ugly stock, but you can get anything from a durable natural looking finish to a mirror-like high-gloss finish with it -- it just depends on what you're after, and how much time and effort you want to devote to the project.  Lots of good YouTubes on how to use it.  This is one of my favorites: 

 

 

I used it on a replacement butt-stock for a Stevens 311.  Took be about a month and a half to get the job done because of all the time it spent inbetween coats while they dried. The time was worth it though, as the finish came out looking very very nice.  finish

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11 hours ago, Sedalia Dave said:

 

I used it on a replacement butt-stock for a Stevens 311.  Took be about a month and a half to get the job done because of all the time it spent inbetween coats while they dried. The time was worth it though, as the finish came out looking very very nice.  finish

When I was young and would nag my mother about when dinner would be served, she would say "do you want it fast, or do you want it good -- you can't have it both ways."  Same applies to stock refinishing.

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Different wood finishes are usually formulated for the type of wood it is applied to. Teak wood is very oily. That is why it is used on boats, it resists water penetration. The teak oil finish that is used to refinish teak has a lot of spirits in it so it can be thinned out so it will penetrate the oily wood. I would not be my first choice for refinishing a stock.

 

Several of the products (like Tru-Oil) work quite well. I have used it on several hundred stocks over the last 50 years or so. (I used to be a stock maker and did lots of repairs and refinishes). Remember to wait between coats to let it thoroughly dry before applying the next coat. If you don't like the gloss finish and want a satin look, there are ways to achieve it. Use automotive rubbing compound, it will do the job nicely. I also use light mineral oil and powdered pumice.

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Just completed refinishing a Belgium A5 and used 6 coats of Tru Oil on what was questionable wood. Came out very well. Will definitely use this technique again.

 

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Re-did my Stoeger stock with Tru-oil. Came out very well. Used Amour-All between coats as suggested on the Rimfire forum. About 10 coats of hand rubbed in under 15 minutes. Each coat hardens amazingly fast with a light coat of Amour-All before applying the Tru-Oil coat. If the oil goes on a little heavy and wrinkles, just sand it out and go again. I sanded all the lame Stoeger checkering off first.

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