Jump to content
SASS Wire Forum

Rossi 92 or keep looking ?


Poet Jones 99980

Recommended Posts

What you failed to read into it was the solid advice given by a guy that has helped countless people get started in this sport.

Yup yup.

 

GG

Link to post
Share on other sites

What you failed to read into it was the solid advice given by a guy that has helped countless people get started in this sport.

Actually not - never questioning that part - just that some people cannot afford to go first rate, and

others find the '92 a perfectly fine rifle to work with for the game.

 

It's easy for some folks to say always buy the best leather, or the guns you're going to end up with later on,

because it's cheaper in the long run, etc.

 

For many shooters this is a try-out of a new game, and one they or may not spend the next ten or twenty years in.

Budgets are tight, jobs are getting scarce, if not gone away for some, and others have competing demands.

The jump from a $450 dollar model 92 to a $1000 plus (add in competitive parts and gunsmithing) '73 may be a

bridge too far. Add in other guns and equipment and it can be too much for a game that may not appeal in a

few years.

 

The '92 was very competitive for many years, and can still be, so it's not a bad gun, just not as preferred as the

'73 rifles, but it's still a fine rifle and much stronger than the toggle bolt designs, by far. I'm not convinced the

'73 is twice the rifle, but it is twice the price.

 

Advice about relative merits of one gun versus another are very useful and let the buyer shape his own

better informed decisions. Points about buying better if you can afford it are always sound advice, as is

recommending going to a match and trying out various rifles (if the hosts will permit it).

 

I've shot several toggle bolt rifles, don't care for them as much as I do the 92. I think for many shooters

you can spend years learning how to shoot accurately and quickly, and then learning and mastering the

physical transitions and the ground strategy of shooting order and positions. To say that you'll master all that

and out grow a rifle in 6 months seems a little far fetched, for most novices. Not saying it isn't possible for

a dedicated competitor, just not typical for most new shooters in this game.

 

That's my opinion though, others disagree and suggest that one should spend more money and buy the

guns that they recommend - I'll stand by my point that some folks cannot, and being told they will just have to do so

eventually may not be true for them.

 

SC

Link to post
Share on other sites

ShadowCatcher,

I agree with you on all points. And I'll add that guns are an investment. If you buy a '92, use it for a while and decide you want something different in the future, you can sell the '92 for what you've got in it or at least very close to it.

 

Possum

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well it's just steel and wood. But have you actually seen what a completely novice shooter can accomplish in 6 months with proper instruction a very small amount of time commitment? I started this game as a newlywed college kid with a part time job. I realize the expense involved. It's a luxury hobby. If you have to start next week and have a budget of $500 buy a 92' and enjoy. If you can wait a little longer and save a little longer buy the next step up. I will never regret discouraging the buying of a 92'. I wish someone had done so for me. But at the time rifle technology was not where it is today and Marlins were the hot ticket and only ran about $100 more than 92's. And no I did not start off with the desire to be competitive. Just wanted to make it through the match without issues. I bought all the stuff that folks told me would be good enough to get me started. It ended up costing me big time $$$ in the long run and lots of frustration.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well it's just steel and wood. But have you actually seen what a completely novice shooter can accomplish in 6 months with proper instruction a very small amount of time commitment? I started this game as a newlywed college kid with a part time job. I realize the expense involved. It's a luxury hobby. If you have to start next week and have a budget of $500 buy a 92' and enjoy. If you can wait a little longer and save a little longer buy the next step up. I will never regret discouraging the buying of a 92'. I wish someone had done so for me. But at the time rifle technology was not where it is today and Marlins were the hot ticket and only ran about $100 more than 92's. And no I did not start off with the desire to be competitive. Just wanted to make it through the match without issues. I bought all the stuff that folks told me would be good enough to get me started. It ended up costing me big time $$$ in the long run and lots of frustration.

 

The bold highlight above represents the type of person I am....

 

Deuce - everything you have told me in this game has PROVEN true. I am finding myself wanting to get better and the only way that has been done is with the equipment (and PRACTICE) you have recommended. You have been able to see what equipment would fit MY game and have added your advice accordingly. You have never recommended that I use the SAME modifications that you use, but rather have helped me fit what's been needed for my game.

 

Folks, I cannot say this enough - IF you can 'buy once - cry once' - DO IT.

 

Also, when one of the best shooters and supporters of this sport make a recommendation - it's something to honestly consider.

 

Yes, the '92 will get you started if that's all you have to get going - 100%, BUT if you want to get better (and chances are you will be challenging yourself to do so)...listen to the top shooters advice.

 

I am NOT near a top shooter, but I am having a lot more FUN using the advice from those deeply rooted in the game.

 

I have these four rifles and here is my ranking:

 

1) '73 - 44 WCF

2) Marlin 94 - 45 Colt (if the Marlin was chambered in 44 WCF it would be tied with #1)

3) Rossi '92 - 45 Colt (hate working this rifle when it's 0° outside :D )

4) Winnie '94 - 45 Colt (stay away from this one - clunky and if I try to run it fast I have trouble)

 

 

GG ~ :FlagAm:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, in this age of "You don't need a rear sight on your rifle" and <.2 sec. spits ya'll may be right... ;)

 

I sometimes forget that when I started with my '92, that we were shooting targets out to 70 yds and for 99% of the shooters giving up a tenth of a second on your splits was not the issue it is today.

 

Can I shoot my '73 faster than I did my '92? Yes. Am I having more fun now than I did then? No.

 

Possum

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, in this age of "You don't need a rear sight on your rifle" and <.2 sec. spits ya'll may be right... ;)

 

I sometimes forget that when I started with my '92, that we were shooting targets out to 70 yds and for 99% of the shooters giving up a tenth of a second on your splits was not the issue it is today.

 

Can I shoot my '73 faster than I did my '92? Yes. Am I having more fun now than I did then? No.

 

Possum

 

if your not having MORE fun, but are still having some fun - nothing wrong with that I suppose.

 

The day this sport becomes less fun or no fun is the day I go somewhere else - don't see that happening :) Life's too short to stay in something you don't enjoy.

 

GG ~ :FlagAm:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Life's too short to stay in something you don't enjoy.

 

GG ~ :FlagAm:

 

GG,

 

I should have used you as a marriage counselor about 40 years ago........... :lol::lol::lol:

 

 

..........Widder

Link to post
Share on other sites

Its good to cover this topic, as we have several times before. I had a Marlin sold it and bought a 92. I still have the 92 and would not get rid of it. Yes older marlins are faster and their use will give the dreaded marlin jam as parts wear. I can run my 66 faster than the 92 but that does me no good in B western. I hope that you are getting into this for mostly fun, I have been doing this for better than 10 years and am not a state, national, or world champion, but that does not mean that my, or any other person with the same experience in this is game, oppinion is less valuable than some one who has won. If not winning means not having fun then wait and buy a 73 already gone through by a well known smith, get some Rugers that are also short stroked, and then find if you go faster with a double or pump. Go with 38 special in the rifle and pistols. also plan on spending a lot of time dry firing and practice plus shooting as many matchs as you can. I started to have fun winning is just iceing on the cake. A bad day shooting is stil a lot better than a good day working. I still try and go fast and win but it is not the main thing for me. Good luck I hope you enjoy this sport no matter which direction you go in it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

You ask the question: 92 or keep looking?

 

its the same question we all ask ourselves in one form or another.

 

should I get the 92 or a NATE (NKJ) 92?

How about the Marlin? Or maybe even a Cowboy Carty Marlin, or a Slick Marlin, or a Lassiter Marlin or a Longhunter Marlin?

 

should I get a 66 or 73?

 

Should I get it from Lassiter, Cowboys & Indians, Pioneer Gun Works, or Cody (Codymatic)? Or maybe Roughneck Rod or Colorado Coffinmaker and ask him to put an excellent OttaWay Smith (Ron Snover) kit in it.

 

Do I only get it slicked up or should I get a Short Stroke kit in it?

 

What Generation short stroke should I get? 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, etc.....

 

Your question is valid.

 

you've have some good post giving you some great advice based on experience and in reference to how YOU want to approach and play this game. We ALL wish you the best in your decision and We All try to help the best we can.

 

if you haven't been to a match or if you haven't had an opportunity to handle many of the rifles mentioned in the above post, then you are limiting yourself before you 'buy in the dark'.

 

If you can get to a match with abunch of shooters involved, check out those rifles. Ask permission to handle some of them.

 

This will be one of your better educational methods to help you make a good decision.

 

Good luck.

 

 

..........Widder

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

GG,

 

I should have used you as a marriage counselor about 40 years ago........... :lol::lol::lol:

 

 

..........Widder

:D yeah...reckon that's true with a number of things....LOL.

 

GG

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm new too. We went to watch one match and the scrounged enough stuff to shoot the match. We went to looking for more suitable guns. Hit every gunshop with a hour's drive. We found very few cowboy guns. Most inventory was concealed carry or tactical. The rest were general hunting guns. We were specifically looking for Uberti single actions in 357 and Marlin 1894s. We found one Uberti 357. The dealer took a week to get back to us on getting a pair - 8 weeks minimum. No 1894s of any kind - new, used, cowboy or not. There were a few Henrys and 92s at one shop.

 

Conclusion, we pretty much wasted our time shopping local. (You may have better luck in an area with a lot of cowboy action shooting. ) We got on gunsamerica and found the Uberti 357s. We went to a state match where we could have outfitted with everything we would need. Did buy an 1894 Marlin 45Colt Cowboy Competition.

 

P.S.

 

In our case, we are not looking for the ultimate race guns. I have many years of experience with Marlin lever guns and SAAs. There is enough "new" to learn without mixing in a different gun design.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been shooting this sport since 1997, and have used both a .44 Mag Marlin 1894S and a Uberti M73 in .357. My wife uses a Browning B92 in .357 & has a Rossi Puma M92 as a backup. My wife's guns work flawlessly, but even will admit that she isn't in this sort to win any laurels! As long as I ensure that the overall length of her ammo is the correct length, she's good to go.

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you do get a '92 (which I don't recommend) try to buy a stainless steel model. You can shoot it on rainy days with less concern for rust. I live in a very dry area and still like having my stainless steel Marlin along during our late summer rainy season.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I started out on a very tight budget, heck I'm still on a very tight budget.

I bought a 92 and within three months i was faster than it. It's all i could afford at the time, so i don't regret it at all. I still have it because from time to time my wife and father like to shoot too. It's also my backup rifle, and my long range pistol cal rifle.

That being said i now shoot a slicked up Marlin.

 

Duece makes a good point. There is nothing more frustrating then being held back by your equipment. I wish i lived closer to him, straight arrow hombre, our cowboy carty to learn how to shoot my rifle to it's potential.

 

 

If you can't afford more, if your like my father who just doesn't want to shoot fast, or if your using it as a duel purpose gun (they make great deer rifles) then get it. If you ever want to or think you may develop into being a fast shooter save your Pennies and get a Marlin our 73

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.