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Rossi 92 or keep looking ?


Poet Jones 99980

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Hi pards,

As some of you already know, I am brand spanking new to the game. I am real confused about which rifle to buy. I am thinking .357/.38. Have been considering a Rossi 92, but there are so many variations...M92, R92, Puma, El Jefe. What are the differences?

Or, should I be looking for a '73 clone? Which is easier for a noob to CAS, but not to gun competition?

Opinions or advice? I am looking to spend around $500.

 

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Hmmm - well - that is a question that will generate a lot of comments.

Have you shot any SASS type rifles?

If not - don't buy one until you do.

Keep hanging out here - and keep asking questions.

The choice of 38 special, however, is a wise choice.

 

- BB

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38 is a good choice.

 

The problem is the price. The model 92 is not as smooth or as fast as a Marlin 94 or a Model 73.

 

The current Marlin94's made by Remington don't work well. The best currently is either a Winchester 73 (now being made in Japan) or the Uberti 73 clones. But they cost quite a bit more.

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You will not tuch a 73 or 66 for 500.

I am a 92 man my self.

Some realy good shooters can out run a 92 , I can Not.

 

If all you have to spend is 500.

Buy any of the 92s and you will have money lrft over to buy spring kit.

 

You can pick up a used 92 for 300 to 400 .

 

This is a easy gun to smooth up your self.

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I really like my 92, but I will say a 73 will run a lot faster in skilled hands. With a $500 limit though, you may want to start with a 92 like I did, and then upgrade after your skills overdo the 92

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:FlagAm::FlagAm::FlagAm::FlagAm::FlagAm:

 

M-92's can be smoothed up a lot. But they are not toggle link rifles.

I have 2 Brownings and a Rossi that are slicked up.

I have shot those M-92's in SASS since I started back in 2001. I am not a fast shooter [usually middle of the overall muster].

But the M-92 is not slowing me down. It's my sight, my arthritis, my reflexes, etc, etc.

 

Mustang Gregg

Model 1892 Lover

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I started with a 92 that I already owned and pistols as well (I did have to double up since I only owned the one at first) and so I went out and got me an 1887 and I was ready to go. I spent a bunch of money on leather so it took awhile but I started to add back up guns to my list of items to blow money on. I ended up with four Bisley Vaqueros, a side by side to go with my 1887, and then it was the rifle to consider. I thought about doubling up with another 92, but I knew I'd want to fancy it up like I did my first one (Stainless mag spring & follower, replacement of the hammer and ejector springs, and lastly remove the bolt safety, weld up the gaping hole and grind and 3M wheel the bolt till it looked like there never was a safety there) Not overly expensive, but time consuming as well as the cost. So I went out and dumped a rump-load of money on a 73. One of the things about the 92 is the strength of the action. When you first see a 73 it's kind of scary in that department. With the dust cover back you see that the shell is held in place by what looks like a 1/4" rod! For large primers it really looks like it just barely covers the primer. Sure most folk are using wimpy loads because it just makes sense (light recoil, less powder cost, and faster to the next target), but I like my guns h#77 bent for stout. I ended up selling the 73 and bought a bunch of ammo and another non-SASS gun. Smithy.

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Go to matches and try different rifles. Most pards will let you borrow theirs to shoot. If your on a tight budget a 92 will be the easiest to find at a decent price.

I looked at and tried 92's at matches when I first started. Only problem I had was they were hard to find at the time. Due to the panic I think. But I got lucky and sold a harley trike I built so had the money to buy a 73. So I bought one as I knew I was only going to buy once.

If you can borrow rifles and save money while doing so I would wait and buy a slicked up 73. I run mine fast but still will never outrun it.

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I'd look for a used Marlin before a 92 but buy something and start shooting!!!! Just get into the sport and have fun, you'll own more rifles than you know what to do with in a few years! Trust me on this.

 

Rye ;)

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Look for a Marlin or a 73'. I mentioned Marlin first because that will be a bit more economical. Most importantly go to shoots and handle and shoot several and see what you like. As someone who bought a whole bunch of the wrong stuff I encourage you to go a little more first class out of the gate even if it means waiting a little longer. You don't have to want to be the next world champ to have guns that are a pleasure to shoot. Inconsistent equipment does NOT add to the enjoyment.

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IMHO the '92 is a better designed and much stronger rifle. But it is just a tad slower than a short stroked toggle link. If sub 15 seconds stages are your ultimate goal, chances are you'll never get there with a '92. Chances are I'll never get there with full autos. :D So it really all boils down to your ultimate goals for SASS. If winning Top Cowboy at EOT is your goal, then you'll have to join the equipment race.

 

But like others have said, shoot 'em all before buying any.

 

I started with a Rossi '92, and have since bought and sold a '73 and bought a '60 Uberti Henry. The '92 is still my favorite rifle. It's light and more of a natural pointer for me. The sights come up to my eyes. I have to look for the front sight with my Henry.

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I had three maxed out '73s and ended up selling the newest of the trio, never could warm up to 38/357 as a cowboy caliber. Even as a bottom feeder when it come to competition I find that I enjoy the feel of a really well tuned short stroke and both Jimmy Spurs and Cody Conager have exceeded my expectations. Never owned a '92 but from what I have heard from some it is smaller and lighter so thus makes into an excellent light rifle for smaller shooters??

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Look for a Marlin or a 73'. I mentioned Marlin first because that will be a bit more economical. Most importantly go to shoots and handle and shoot several and see what you like. As someone who bought a whole bunch of the wrong stuff I encourage you to go a little more first class out of the gate even if it means waiting a little longer. You don't have to want to be the next world champ to have guns that are a pleasure to shoot. Inconsistent equipment does NOT add to the enjoyment.

 

Best advice right here...

 

GG ~ :FlagAm:

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I started this game in '03 and back then most started with Marlins. Had three of em and none made me happy.One day I shot a pard's '92 and fell in love! Back then the '73's weren't nearly as popular as they are now. I had to quit in '07 and just started back this past spring. Since I had sold all my cowboy guns I had to re-acquire . Thing is NOW I knew what worked or me after much experimentation in earlier years. Moral of the story? Try as many different types as you can....and buy once.

ENJOY!

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Lots of good advice already posted. The category you decide to shoot could also impact your choice. For example, in B-Western you can’t use an 1873, but must use an 1880 or higher rifle (Shooters Handbook,pg 15, B-Western - “Rifles: Any SASS–legal rifle of 1880 or later design or a replica thereof (e.g., Burgess, Lightning Rifle, 1892, 1894 Winchester or Marlin))”. I started off with a nice Uberti 1873 with a short stroke kit but then decided to shoot B-Western so I needed a more modern rifle design. I selected a Winchester 1892 (made by Miroku in Japan – a very well made but expensive firearm). I find the 92s to be easy handling, natural pointers, and a smaller, yet stronger overall design. They are often the lever gun used in many cowboy TV series and movies and I understand were used by many rural police/sheriff departments up to about 1970 or so. Also, If you ever need to use your Cowboy rifle to shoot medium game, I hear a 92 with full powered 357 loads can take a dear out to 100 – 150 yards with no concern that the round is too powerful for the rifle. I also bought a Rossi 92 but was very, very unhappy with the quality control. I know the Rossi is a bargain priced rifle and did not expect it to be Winchester quality but after I unpacked the rifle, it appeared to be factory reject quality with rough jagged metal imperfections in the receiver, very poor wood/stock to rifle fit, and a very rough and choppy action. Lesson – open up the box and inspect a firearm carefully before accepting delivery, my mistake. In fairness to Rossi, I hear many Cowboys are very happy with their Rossi rifles. I just won’t buy one if they let such poor guns slip by whatever goes for their quality control. You should note that some 357 92s are stamped “357 Only” like the Winchester/Miroku and don’t feed 38s very well or at all.



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Of course if you really want to know ANYTHING about the '92 (and all the various models/mfgs) contact Nate Kiowa Jones at Steve's Gunz:

 

He IS the 92 authority

 

http://stevesgunz.com/

 

GG ~ :FlagAm:

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My first three rifle were 92s all done by Stevesgunz.He was really close to me.I still have one 92 and will never sell it,it is brass and I love it.I hunt with it.It very slick and will be there for you.I have two 73s one done by Cody and one done by the LA. Gunfighters.Both are super fast and as slick as you can get one.Go to lots of shoots handle and shoot as many rifles as you can.Get what to can afford and enjoy.

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I guess I'd say that the '92 is a fine rifle that can be made better by NKJ, or at least by following his advice on tuning it.

Unless you're the sort who will never buy another rifle or trade up, there is no reason not to start with an affordable rifle,

make it perform better, and improve your own ability using it.

 

When you get to the point that your hardware is the limiting factor you will surely get most of your money back on a '92

and can buy the vunder-rifle that will take you to the sub 15 second goal of the winning crowd.

 

Or you can spend your time on transitions and really improve your time without trying to buy a piece of hardware to

solve it for you . . . .

 

YMMV,

 

SC

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I guess I'd say that the '92 is a fine rifle that can be made better by NKJ, or at least by following his advice on tuning it.

Unless you're the sort who will never buy another rifle or trade up, there is no reason not to start with an affordable rifle,

make it perform better, and improve your own ability using it.

 

When you get to the point that your hardware is the limiting factor you will surely get most of your money back on a '92

and can buy the vunder-rifle that will take you to the sub 15 second goal of the winning crowd.

 

Or you can spend your time on transitions and really improve your time without trying to buy a piece of hardware to

solve it for you . . . .

 

YMMV,

 

SC

 

And if you do work on transitions in less than six months you'll be looking for something more. I've played the 92' game,several times. Everyones mileage may vary but there is no denying certain recipes. Success does not have to be measured on a timer. Have watched a few local folks continue to shoot guns that are slightly better than a rock or stick and leave tired and beat up rather than happy and excited about the sport. Again it don't cost that much more to go first class.

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And if you do work on transitions in less than six months you'll be looking for something more. I've played the 92' game,several times. Everyones mileage may vary but there is no denying certain recipes. Success does not have to be measured on a timer. Have watched a few local folks continue to shoot guns that are slightly better than a rock or stick and leave tired and beat up rather than happy and excited about the sport. Again it don't cost that much more to go first class.

 

A BIG +1 The man knows what he's talking about. Many of the responses above would lead one to think the 92 is a great option - kinda odd really. :blink:

 

Go to a shoot and see what people are actually using. I suspect you will see very few, if any 92s. That speaks volumes.. :)

 

At the NM Championships, I saw two being used...... <_<

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I have a stainless steel Rossi 92 slicked up by Nate Kiowa Jones and really like it. However, if you can do as some others have suggested go to somes shoots and try different rifles if you can. I like my 92 in 45 Colt as that is what I shoot in my Rugers and it is nice to only have to worry about one caliber.

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I started with a 92 because I was on a budget and had to buy a shotgun, pistols, reloading equipment and leather. I had Nate smooth my 92. The gun is really as good as 92 can be, but I got faster and at one point I caught myself waiting on my rifle. I bought a short stroked 73 and my 92 moved to the back of my safe. I still like the gun and it would be a solid weapon come the zombie apocalypse but my main match cowboy rifle and its backup are 73s with similar short stroke throws.

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Can I say once again just buy something already and go shoot!!!! We've all been through the gambit of cowboy guns and ya know what? I loved every minute of it even the bad ones!

 

JUST GO SHOOT!!!!

 

Rye ;)

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Thanks for all your kind advice fellers,

I am learning a lot just hangin' round here. It's nice to be able to pick a buncha brains without gettin' the occasional "funny look". I am quickly learning that like other hobbies and games that are pretty much vet dominated are about Brotherhood and Community. I am very grateful.

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I started 10 years ago with a stainless 92 in .357. I now own 4 1873s and 3 Marlins and no 92s. The 92 will work for CAS, but it is slower than Marlins, 1866s, and 1873s. They can also be overall length and bullet shape sensitive with ammo.

 

No offence to 92 shooters, but you'll probably wind up with a different rifle in the future, if you buy the 92 now.

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And if you do work on transitions in less than six months you'll be looking for something more. I've played the 92' game,several times. Everyones mileage may vary but there is no denying certain recipes. Success does not have to be measured on a timer. Have watched a few local folks continue to shoot guns that are slightly better than a rock or stick and leave tired and beat up rather than happy and excited about the sport. Again it don't cost that much more to go first class.

 

Yup - like is said - buy ONCE...cry ONCE.

 

GG ~ :FlagAm:

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And if you do work on transitions in less than six months you'll be looking for something more. I've played the 92' game,several times. Everyones mileage may vary but there is no denying certain recipes. Success does not have to be measured on a timer. Have watched a few local folks continue to shoot guns that are slightly better than a rock or stick and leave tired and beat up rather than happy and excited about the sport. Again it don't cost that much more to go first class.

That almost sounded like a very generous offer to pay the difference for those who can't otherwise afford it.

 

But I'm sure I read too much into your comment . . . .

 

SC

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That almost sounded like a very generous offer to pay the difference for those who can't otherwise afford it.

 

But I'm sure I read too much into your comment . . . .

 

SC

Deuce is a first rate Pard.

I can tell you for shure any advice given by Deuce is good advice.

 

He is just saying if you can afford to buy the best its the way to go.

 

He has spent lots of money working his way to the top.

 

Deuce told me if he could do it all over again,

He would have saved his money and bought first rate stuff in the first place.

 

Buy the time you are done buying and selling ,

And working your way up .

You spend three or four times the money .

So if you can go first rate .

 

I shoot ONLY local monthly matches .

The 92 works just fine for me .

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That almost sounded like a very generous offer to pay the difference for those who can't otherwise afford it.

 

But I'm sure I read too much into your comment . . . .

 

SC

What you failed to read into it was the solid advice given by a guy that has helped countless people get started in this sport.

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Deuce is a first rate Pard.

I can tell you for shure any advice given by Deuce is good advice.

 

He is just saying if you can afford to buy the best its the way to go.

 

He has spent lots of money working his way to the top.

 

Deuce told me if he could do it all over again,

He would have saved his money and bought first rate stuff in the first place.

 

Buy the time you are done buying and selling ,

And working your way up .

You spend three or four times the money .

So if you can go first rate .

 

I shoot ONLY local monthly matches .

The 92 works just fine for me .

Yup..

 

GG

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