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I'm a Dog


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I found this on FB.   A very good little article about dog ownership 

 

 

Everyone who is thinking of getting dogs should read this because you need to understand this reality:
***I am a 21st century dog.***
-I'm a Malinois.
Overskilled among dogs, I excel in all disciplines and I'm always ready to work: I NEED to work.
But nowadays I get asked to chill on the couch all day everyday.
-I am an Akita Inu.
My ancestors were selected for fighting bears.
Today I get asked to be tolerant and I get scolded for my reactivity when another approaches me.
-I am a Beagle.
When I chase my prey, I raise my voice so the hunters could follow.
Today they put an electric collar on me to shut up, and you make me come back to you - no running - with a snap of your fingers.
-I am a Yorkshire Terrier.
I was a terrifying rat hunter in English mines.
Today they think I can't use my legs and they always hold me in their arms.
-I'm a Labrador Retriever.
My vision of happiness is a dive into a pond to bring back the duck he shot to my master.
Today you forget I'm a walking, running, swimming dog; as a result I'm fat, made to stay indoors, and to babysit.
-I am a Jack Russell.
I can take on a fox, a mean badger, and a rat bigger than me in his den.
Today I get scolded for my character and high energy, and forced to turn into a quiet living room dog.
-I am a Siberian Husky.
Experienced the great, wide open spaces of Northern Europe, where I could drag sleds for long distances at impressive speeds.
Today I only have the walls of the house or small garden as a horizon, and the holes I dig in the ground just to release energy and frustration, trying to stay sane.
-I am a border collie
I was made to work hours a day in partnershipwith my master, and I am an unmistakable artist of working with the herd.
Today they are mad at me because, for lack of sheep, I try to check bikes, cars, children in the house and everything in motion.
I am ...
I am a 21st century dog.
I'm pretty, I'm alert, I'm obedient, I stay in a bag...but I'm also an individual who, from centuries of training, needs to express my instincts, and I am *not* suited for the sedentary life you'd want me to lead.
Spending eight hours a day alone in the house or in the garden - with no work and no one to play or run with, seeing you for a short time in the evening when you get home, and only getting a small toilet walk will make me deeply unhappy.
I'll express it by barking all day, turning your yard into a minefield, doing my needs indoors, being unmanageable the rare times I'll find myself outside, and sometimes spending my days sunk, sad, lonely, and depressed, on my pillow.
You may think that I should be happy to be able to enjoy all this comfort while you go to work, but actually I’ll be exhausted and frustrated, because this is absolutely NOT what I'm meant to do, or what I need to be doing.
If you love me, if you've always dreamed of me, if my beautiful blue eyes or my athletic look make you want me, but you can't give me a real dog's life, a life that's really worth living according to my breed, and if you can't offer me the job that my genes are asking, DO NOT buy or adopt me!
If you like the way I look but aren't willing to accept my temperament, gifts, and traits derived from long genetic selection, and you think you can change them with only your good will, then DO NOT BUY OR ADOPT ME.
I’m a dog from the 21st century, yes, but deep inside me, the one who fought, the one who hunted, the one who pulled sleds, the one who guided and protected a herd still lives within.
So think **very** carefully before you choose your dog. And think about getting two, rather than one, so I won't be so very lonely waiting for you all day. Eight or ten hours is just a workday to you, but it's an eternity for me to be alone.

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1 hour ago, Subdeacon Joe said:

Eight or ten hours is just a workday to you, but it's an eternity for me to be alone.

 

Had this conversation with a cousin just last week.  Not only is it not "fair" to the dog, it's borderline cruelty.

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I am a Standard Poodle owner:

  • Custer takes me for 4 - 5 walks a day for about 2 - 4 miles total. Yes, "takes" me. I let him decide where we are going to go.
  • Custer plays with me in the yard 2 - 3 times a day.
  • Custer goes on hikes 3 - 4 times a week.
  • Custer gets to go to the neighborhood Happy Hour to play with Ginger, a neighbors dog, 5 -6 times a week. Sometimes twice a day.
  • Custer "fights" with me almost every day.
  • Custer gets to sniff everything along his walks and hikes (sometimes I may cut him short if it's something he shouldn't be sniffing).
  • When it snows, we go out several times a day to play in the snow. He loves to go for walks in a blizzard with deep snow!:rolleyes:

 

All said, I think Custer has a pretty good life.

 

My neighbor (who is not a dog person), said he wants to come back as my dog!:D

 

Edited by Injun Ryder, SASS #36201L
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Above all, take the responsibility of taking your dog for regular veterinary visits. Taking a dog, or any animal, to a vet isn't cheap but is necessary to maintain the dog's health. If you won't take a dog to the vet for regular checkups, don't get a dog.

 

Although vaccines are a touchy subject these days, get your dog vaccinated with all of the available vaccines. Give them the heartworm preventatives for use at home also. 

 

Know when his time has come. It's hard, damn hard...I have tears in my eyes thinking about it...you'll know when...just have to do it.

 

Above all, if you can't afford a dog and are not prepared for a lifetime commitment, don't get one.

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We have a 2yo F Malinois, thankfully she hasn't seen nor thought of doing this yet.

Screenshot_20240313-112730.png

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1 hour ago, Cypress Sun said:

 

Above all, take the responsibility of taking your dog for regular veterinary visits. Taking a dog, or any animal, to a vet isn't cheap but is necessary to maintain the dog's health. If you won't take a dog to the vet for regular checkups, don't get a dog.

 

Although vaccines are a touchy subject these days, get your dog vaccinated with all of the available vaccines. Give them the heartworm preventatives for use at home also. 

 

Know when his time has come. It's hard, damn hard...I have tears in my eyes thinking about it...you'll know when...just have to do it.

 

Above all, if you can't afford a dog and are not prepared for a lifetime commitment, don't get one.

I put $2100.00 into my dogs mouth three years ago  because her old age teeth were failing.  It was worth every penny.  I honesty hope she dies before I do because she suffered so much when my wife died.  I don't want her togo through that again.

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14 minutes ago, Dr. Zook said:

We have a 2yo F Malinois, thankfully she hasn't seen nor thought of doing this yet.

Screenshot_20240313-112730.png

I have never had a big digger after I made sure I always had two or more dogs.  Dogs that are bored do strange things.

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2 hours ago, Injun Ryder, SASS #36201L said:

Custer gets to sniff everything along his walks and hikes (sometimes I may cut him short if it's something he shouldn't be sniffing).

 

Let me guess....

Half the time Custer will backtrack about 10 feet to go back and sniff something.   

 

April would do that on walks, just suddenly turn around and go back to sniff something.  "Hmm....that just might have been interesting...bettergo backandcheck. "

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17 minutes ago, Subdeacon Joe said:

April would do that on walks, just suddenly turn around and go back to sniff something.  "Hmm....that just might have been interesting...bettergo backandcheck. "

That's Kimber, with no warning! Taken me right off my feet more than once! Or pulls for 100' to pee on something from yesterday!

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The only times mine are on the leash is for training or Vet trips.  I have the good fortune to live in the country with lots of space.

Edited by Rip Snorter
spelling
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Our boy and my little companion was a rescue dog I got in Phoenix 6 weeks before my retirement. When I got Buster, he was 2 weeks from being put down, he was malnourished, very sick with kennel cough and he had fleas. In the 6 weeks I had him before I retired, I spent over $1000 in vet bills bringing him back to health and his healthy weight of 20 pounds. Buster was a Dorkie, a Yorkshire Terrier/ Dachshund mix, he was 5 years old when I rescued him and I didn't want to know what his life was like before I came along. I was told he did not like men which he proved to be wrong immediately when I first got to hold him, he gave me the biggest hug even in his weakened state. I retired in Chino Valley, AZ, I met Barb and he became the best little dog that Barb and I could have ever hoped for. He loved to travel and loved his walks and playtime in the park twice a day. When the weather was bad, he loved to have us throw the toy of his choosing in the house so he could bring it back. He would fetch until he was worn out. During the nine years we were blessed with his companionship we spent over $5000 keeping him healthy with his medical and dental checkups, but his old age finally took its toll as his body started shutting down, his weight dropped from 20 pounds to 12 pounds. Our vet told us he was letting us know it was time to let him go. It was the hardest decision we ever had to make when we took Buster to the vet for the last time, but we knew it was what was best for our 14 year old little boy. We were both with him when he crossed over the rainbow bridge his fur wet with our tears. We had 9 wonderful years with Buster, he was not our pet, he was one of the family, we still miss him, he's only been gone 5 months. His last day was October 25th, 2023, and every month on the 25th Barb and I have a glass of wine together and give a toast to Buster, gone but not forgotten and forever loved.  It's true, that dogs leave paw prints on your heart.  A picture of Buster is at the bottom of this posting. RIP little buddy.

Edited by Tex Wilson
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17 hours ago, Sedalia Dave said:


 Nothing but a blue square. 

It says the url has expired.

 

TM

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11 hours ago, Tex Wilson said:

Our boy and my little companion was a rescue dog I got in Phoenix 6 weeks before my retirement. When I got Buster, he was 2 weeks from being put down, he was malnourished, very sick with kennel cough and he had fleas. In the 6 weeks I had him before I retired, I spent over $1000 in vet bills bringing him back to health and his healthy weight of 20 pounds. Buster was a Dorkie, a Yorkshire Terrier/ Dachshund mix, he was 5 years old when I rescued him and I didn't want to know what his life was like before I came along. I was told he did not like men which he proved to be wrong immediately when I first got to hold him, he gave me the biggest hug even in his weakened state. I retired in Chino Valley, AZ, I met Barb and he became the best little dog that Barb and I could have ever hoped for. He loved to travel and loved his walks and playtime in the park twice a day. When the weather was bad, he loved to have us throw the toy of his choosing in the house so he could bring it back. He would fetch until he was worn out. During the nine years we were blessed with his companionship we spent over $5000 keeping him healthy with his medical and dental checkups, but his old age finally took its toll as his body started shutting down, his weight dropped from 20 pounds to 12 pounds. Our vet told us he was letting us know it was time to let him go. It was the hardest decision we ever had to make when we took Buster to the vet for the last time, but we knew it was what was best for our 14 year old little boy. We were both with him when he crossed over the rainbow bridge his fur wet with our tears. We had 9 wonderful years with Buster, he was not our pet, he was one of the family, we still miss him, he's only been gone 5 months. His last day was October 25th, 2023, and every month on the 25th Barb and I have a glass of wine together and give a toast to Buster, gone but not forgotten and forever loved.  It's true, that dogs leave paw prints on your heart.  A picture of Buster is at the bottom of this posting. RIP little buddy.

Rescues seem to know they were rescued. :wub: Our last 2 have been rescues and if we live long enough, future fur kids will be too.

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