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Subdeacon Joe

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Smoked, bacon wrapped, double stuffed Oreos. Yum. 
 

wrap a double stuffed Oreo cookie with a half slice of bacon and sprinkle lightly with a sweet bbq rub and smoke on the pellet smoker for 45 minutes at 250 degrees or until the bacon is done to your liking. My grandkids love these things. The debate right now is whether they’re an appetizer or dessert.

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24 minutes ago, Yul Lose said:

Smoked, bacon wrapped, double stuffed Oreos. Yum. 
 

wrap a double stuffed Oreo cookie with a half slice of bacon and sprinkle lightly with a sweet bbq rub and smoke on the pellet smoker for 45 minutes at 250 degrees or until the bacon is done to your liking. My grandkids love these things. The debate right now is whether they’re an appetizer or dessert.

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D3704E83-FA80-448D-9FD6-990378AFFF9B.jpeg

 

Either an appezert or a dessertizer.

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Talk about idiot simple!  And you can really change up the taste ... hot or sweet italian sausage, pork breakfast sausage, chorizo, bratwurst. 

 

CREAM CHEESE SAUSAGE BALLS

 

1 lb hot sausage, uncooked (or any sausage you prefer)

8 oz cream cheese, softened

1 1/4 cups Bisquick

4 oz cheddar cheese, shredded

 

Preheat oven to 400F.

Mix all ingredients until well combined. (I use my KitchenAid mixer with the dough hook attachment) Roll into 1-inch balls. Bake for 20-25 minutes, or until brown.

Sausage balls may be frozen uncooked. If baking frozen, add a few minutes to the baking time.

 

UPDATE:

 

We tried it, an idiot simple appetizer and snack.   I didn't turn them and they got a very crunchy crust on the bottom, which I like.  Otherwise turn them over about half way through the baking for more even cooking.

There are lots of ways to play with this.  We used sweet Italian sausage (from Oliver's), Buttermilk Bisque, and cheddar cheese.   Hot Italian sausage would work, or a mix of sweet and hot.  Pork breakfast sausage would work.  Mexican Chorizo (maybe par cook to render out some of the fat first), bratwurst, lamb sausage.  Pretty much any bulk Sausage you like.  Same for the cheese - cheddar, gruyere, Swiss, havarti, mozzarella.  Maybe American, but that might be too melty.  

Other variations might be to use Jiffy Cornbread Mix or a hush puppy mix.   

They scream for a dipping sauce.  BBQ, Blue Cheese Dressing, Ginger-Sesame Salad Dressing, Tzatziki would all work.  

Play with it.   Inflict it on friends and neighbors on New Years Eve.

Edited by Subdeacon Joe
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Sort of a little secret, now that I put it on the www it’s no longer a secret of course. I get a recipe once in a while, the recipe is destined for magazine and/or book publication.  I can’t name them or share the recipes. But I sort of understand how the system works now.  Recipes can’t be copyrighted but you really can’t copy a recipe from somewhere and put it in your book.* You must “new and improve” it somehow.  Where do I fit in here? I read the recipe, follow it if I make it and comment. No pay, no glory. I might get quoted, as Ed F.


currently West Lake Beef Soup. It a Chinese recipe of some renown, no, no cat or dog involved. But planning to do it is entertainment for me.

——————

* There are books that gather recipes from the internet and publish them. You can usually identify them by ads that say something like “50 lasagna recipes”.  That seems to be a criterion for a cookbook. You need at least 50 recipes. One book I reviewed had 48 recipes, haphazardly in alphabetical order and then two unrelated recipes thrown in at the end,

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A treat from Scotland. In a Scottish group I belong to, the discussion turned to sweet treats - specifically Tablet, a treat similar to fudge but not quite as soft. Everyone was discussing their recipes and how their grandmother made it so I thought I would post this one from Elizabeth Cleland's 1755 A New and Easy Method of Cookery
May be an image of text
 
 
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BREAKFAST THIS MORNING

Disclaimer: Nothing fancy or chef grade, falling back on my poor talents at the stove because ... well, Sailor-dog and I are home alone, the wife is at work on Christmas day (she's the only full time radiographer they have left, insert lengthy rant about her employer and use Skeeter Skelton's term, "Gringos Chipskatas") -- anyway, she's at work and I'm hungry.

INGREDIENTS:

One potato of a size that suits you. Scrub clean and dice fine.

Two eggs, set those where they won't roll off and hit the floor.

Don't ask why I inserted that disclaimer.

Butter, a couple thick slabs, to fry taters and eggs in, unless you want to use olive oil, vegetable, canola, corn or Quaker State. Your choice. I don't use Quaker State myself, makes the taters taste poorly and sets off the smoke alarm.

Soy sauce.

Salt, pepper, Italian seasoning, Garlic Basil seasoning, whatever you usually put on taters and eggs.

Fry taters in your favorite gut grease until browning nicely.

Crack two eggs in a bowl, spin 'em up with a fork, add two shakes of soy sauce, spin 'em again to get 'em nice and fluffy.

Pour into frying taters.

Fry egg mixture until it's solid, I don't like my eggs runny a'tall.

Turn once and sprinkle shredded cheese on the newly exposed, singin' hot side you just turned up.

Wait for the cheese to melt at least a little before you divide this in two and shovel it onto plates, unless you're going to eat it all yourself, then shovel it onto one plate.

Makes a fine breakfast and Sailor-dog likes to prewash the plate afterward so he must like it too.

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Interesting experiment.

 

Some time back I was down to the bottom of a sack of tortilla chips, and it was all just little bitty pieces and crumbs, and I got this brilliant idea.

 

I put all the pieces in a ziplock bag, and then I crushed it up real fine with a rolling pin. Stuck it in the freezer so it would not go bad. And I planned to use it as a thickener if my chili was too runny. I was thinking like massMASA.

 

So tonight I saw that the chili was a little runny, and I got it out of the freezer and busted it all up and put it in the chili. Stirred it in and let it cook for a few more hours (I make my chili in a crock pot).

 

It added the very distinct tortilla chip flavor to the chili. I was not expecting that. Thinking about it now, I certainly should have expected it, but I didn't.

 

Still -- it was pretty good.

Edited by Alpo
DAMN you, otto korrik. DAMN YOU TO HECK!!
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We just had a lovely lunch.  In the Safeway Managers Specials (stuff coming up on expiration date)  in the meat dept. there had been frenched racks of lamb - price with the discount was about $5/pound - not bad for lamb.  I found this to try, it looks a lot more complicated than it is.  The mint/garlic/cheese/crumb crust would be nice on chicken, port, or even on a  burger (get a hard sear on both sides of the burger patty, paint it with the honey/mustard glaze, pack the mint mix on ot, and pop it into  the oven).
 

Mint Crusted Rack of Lamb

Ingredients

 

1 cup fresh mint leaves

2 cloves garlic, sliced

2 tablespoons olive oil

½ cup plain bread crumbs

salt and ground black pepper to taste

1 pinch cayenne pepper, or to taste

1 ½ tablespoons finely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese

¼ cup Dijon mustard

2 teaspoons honey

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

2 teaspoons rice vinegar

2 teaspoons honey

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

1 pinch salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

2 (1 1/4 pound) racks of lamb, trimmed

1 teaspoon vegetable oil

salt and pepper to taste

 

 

Directions

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C).

Line a baking sheet with foil.

Cook mint leaves in a pot of boiling water for about 10 seconds.

Transfer mint leaves to a bowl of ice water; soak for 30 seconds, drain and squeeze dry.

Combine blanched mint with garlic, olive oil, bread crumbs, salt, black pepper, and cayenne pepper in a food processor or blender. Blend for 20 to 30 seconds until fine and crumbly.

Transfer mint mixture to a large bowl; stir in Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, set aside.

Combine 1/4 cup Dijon mustard and 2 teaspoons honey in a small bowl, set aside.

Combine extra-virgin olive oil, rice vinegar, 2 teaspoons honey, 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard, salt, and black pepper in a jar with a lid. Shake vinaigrette vigorously until combined, about 30 seconds. Set vinaigrette aside.

Slice 1/2 to 1-inch slits between each bone of the lamb racks to assure the meat roasts evenly.

Season each rack with salt and black pepper on all sides.

Heat vegetable oil in skillet over high heat. Brown each lamb rack for 2 to 3 minutes on each side.

Transfer lamb racks to the foil-lined baking sheet.

Brush each rack with mustard and honey mixture. Sprinkle mint mixture over the top and sides of each rack.

Bake in the preheated oven until browned on top and medium rare in the center, about 20 minutes. An instant-read thermometer inserted into the center should read 125 to 130 degrees F (52 to 54 degrees C). Remove from oven and allow lamb to rest for 10 minutes before serving, drizzled with honey mustard vinaigrette.

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BREAKFAST, AGAIN

INGREDIENTS:

Bacon,uncooked, half pound

Eggs, three if it's just me, four if it's my wife and I, medium or large. Gammaw one time had Banty hen eggs and they were so tiny as to be cute. They fried up fine but they were so little bitty it took fifteen of 'em to make a dozen.

 

Heat your cast iron skillet slowly, add the bacon and fry it up however crispy you like it.

My method:

Wear long sleeve shirt and long pants.

Go to basement.

Get rubber gunsmithing apron.

Put on apron.

Find vise grips.

Put on leather welding gloves.

Put on grinding hood.

Go back upstairs.

Clamp the flat flapper from a turner, in the vise grips, because I was a bachelor and didn't have to nickles to rub together.

My flapperdoodle turner thing broke on me.

Why buy a new turner when I can use the broke off flapper and pliers?

Fry bacon.

Try not to flinch every time hot grease pops.

Pile fried bacon on warm plate, crack eggs into bacon grease, pepper to taste (this again was in my bachelor days, my seasonings were salt, pepper and appetite. I have unlearned those bad habits since marrying my beautiful bride!) and fry until done.

End up flinching every time frying bacon grease pops, express gratitude to the Almighty every time hot grease hits flannel shirtsleeve, rubber coated apron, or that clear plastic grinding visor, instead of hitting my hide.

Clean up grease spatters afterward.

 

My wife's method:

Add bacon to frying pan.

Turn down fire so it'll fry without popping.

Proceed as normal without benefit of long sleeves, long pants, rubber grinding visor or leather welding gloves.

Season with garlic-rosemary mix or other spices she keeps on hand. Her mama cooked with spices and she does too.

I told her about my bachelor method.

She gave me a sympathetic look, laid gentle fingertips on my shoulder and said quietly, "I think we can afford to replace a turner if we break one."

Edited by Linn Keller, SASS 27332, BOLD 103
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SUPPER:  CHICKEN POT PIE

From the Culinarily Challenged Kitchen

INGREDIENTS:

Potatoes, I used all I had, maybe five of 'em. Washed, sliced, diced however fine or however coarse you lilke. I cut mine fine. 

Carrots, bag of, a good heaping double handful, also sliced and diced however fine you do or don't want them. I like mine fine, like the taters.

Peas, frozen bag of, these were old and I think the wife used them on a sprained thumb last year. Microwaved mine in bag on plate. If yours doesn't say "Microwave in Bag" snip off the corner so no boom. Steam explosions are not a welcome surprise anytime.

2 cans chicken breast, I used 3 cans because I had a long casserole dish. Mash 'em up, a potato masher does good work.

Rosemary garlic seasoning, parsley, sage, pepper, savory, again as much or as little as suits your taste.

Two or three cans of chicken gravy.

Bisquick & Milk, more about that in a minute.

Dice and boil taters and carrots in separate pans, carrots generally take longer. When done, drain water and add to casserole, just dump on top of mashed-up chicken. Dump in the chicken gravy, take your spatula or whatever flat flapper you use to turn your fried eggs and stir up this awful looking mess. Mix to uniformly distribute ingredients (my, don't that sound like fine language!).

Now here's the Bisquick an milk I promsed.

Mix to a slurry (I know slurry, I've mixed concrete!)

(If I'd say that to my wife she would cover her eyes and shake her head)

... and dump the concrete -- I mean slurry -- over the ingredients you just shoveled around in the casserole dish.

Preheat the oven to 350 and bake for a half hour.

 

I will beg your collective pardon for heavy reliance on canned and frozen. It's what my wife gets, it's what she said to use. She's also working a twelve hour shift for the next few days, and she's wanted chicken pot pie for the past couple of evenings. 

She left me an ingredient list and instructions.

Soon as I mix the concrete slurry I'll get it in the oven!

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4 minutes ago, Linn Keller, SASS 27332, BOLD 103 said:

Peas, frozen bag of, these were old and I think the wife used them on a sprained thumb last year

 

How did you prepare that?   Sort of a cobbler?

 

6 minutes ago, Linn Keller, SASS 27332, BOLD 103 said:

will beg your collective pardon for heavy reliance on canned and frozen

 

Nothing at all wrong with frozen and canned for the most part.  Frozen veggies are usually at their peak.  I do avoid frozen or canned Brussels Sprouts.   Likewise I avoid canned peas, canned spinach, and some brands of canned corn.

 

Canned meats are great for pot pies, stews, and soups, just be aware of the salt in them.

 

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On 1/2/2023 at 3:21 PM, Subdeacon Joe said:

 

How did you prepare that?   Sort of a cobbler?

 

 

Nothing at all wrong with frozen and canned for the most part.  Frozen veggies are usually at their peak.  I do avoid frozen or canned Brussels Sprouts.   Likewise I avoid canned peas, canned spinach, and some brands of canned corn.

 

Canned meats are great for pot pies, stews, and soups, just be aware of the salt in them.

 

 

Out of curiosity, why do you avoid frozen/canned Brussels and canned peas/corn?

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3 minutes ago, Cypress Sun said:

 

Out of curiosity, why do you avoid frozen/canned Brussels and canned peas/corn?

 

Every time I've tried to cook frozen or canned Brussels Sprouts they end up mushy and tasteless - even if all I did was salt and pepper them right out of the can, or after they thawed.
Canned peas - peas shouldn't be a grey-green color and mushy.  Now, a lot may have changed in 30 years, but that was my experience with them.

Not all canned corn.  Big name brands are usually pretty good.  The last few times I've tried off-brand or house brand canned corn it's been tough and starchy.  Almost as if they had used field corn rather than sweet corn.

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Brussels sprouts.  I can’t imagine them canned, I bet they’d be too wet.

 

I had an aversion to Brussel sprouts. Soon, in culinary school, I realized it was because they were boiled. Very bitter. Then I realized the truth, my mother boiled everything. Well not quite, before she made a chowder she cooked the onions, and burned them.

 

Sprouts are quite good if roasted.

 

Frozen Brussel sprouts? I don’t know how to roast them.

 

 

Edited by Marshal Mo Hare, SASS #45984
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16 minutes ago, Subdeacon Joe said:

 

Same problem as canned - too wet.  The freeze/thaw ruptures cells and there is no way for them not to be too wet.  

The blast freezing method discovered by Clarence Birdseye does not rupture cells, it freezes things at -40°.  But still Brussels sprouts just aren’t good, IMO OF COURSE.

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38 minutes ago, Marshal Mo Hare, SASS #45984 said:

The blast freezing method discovered by Clarence Birdseye does not rupture cells, it freezes things at -40°.  But still Brussels sprouts just aren’t good, IMO OF COURSE.

 

Something else then turns the insides to mush.

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  • 2 weeks later...

A little on the cool side today, a soup day.
 

Tomato Soup with Carrots and Ginger

 

1 TBS Butter (or margarine or olive oil)

1 Large Onion, Diced fine

2 Small Carrots Grated

3 or 4 Garlic Cloves, minced

About and inch of Ginger, grated

3 Green Onions, thinly sliced

2 cans Diced Tomatoes

2 – 4 TBS Vegetarian Chicken Base

2 oz. Tomato Paste

Salt and Pepper

 

 

Put a heavy pot on medium heat, add Butter.  Dice Onion and grate Carrots, add to pot.  Season with a little Salt and Pepper.
Mince the Garlic, grate the Ginger, add to pot, stir.  Add the Canned Tomatoes (I had a can of fire roasted and a can of “Italian Style”) along with 2 TBS of Chicken Base (I use Orrington Farms Vegan Chicken Base) and 3 cans of water.

As it comes to a simmer, use an immersion blender to blend some of it down.  I like lots of texture to my soup so I only did it a little, maybe 14 seconds.  Add the Tomato Paste.  Stir, Add Green Onions. Stir.

 

Bring to a simmer for about 20 to 30 minutes.  Taste and adjust seasoning.  I found that I needed the other 2 TBS of the Chicken Base. And a little more Black Pepper.
To make it vegan, use margarine or olive oil.  To make it Lenten, use margarine, or saute` the vegetables in water.

 

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CABBAGE.    INTERNATIONAL.  

 

Cabbage Piroshki Using Egg Roll Wrappers

 

Makes 8 to 10

 

(I wanted to do some cooking, didn't want to make a carrot cake - ok, I DID want to make carrot cake but didn't want to make something that deadly to the waistline.  I saw a partial package of Egg Roll Wrappers and it set the brain to working)

1 pkg. Egg Roll Wrappers

2 TBS Butter

½ head Cabbage, chopped fine

¼ cup Minced Onion

4 Crimini Mushrooms, minced

4 cloves Garlic, minced

3 Eggs, hard cooked, minced

3 to 6 sprigs Fresh Dill, minced fine

Salt to taste

Melt butter in skillet over medium heat.  Add cabbage and a little salt.  Sauté a few minutes, add Onion, Garlic, and Mushrooms. Sauté until tender, adjust seasoning.   Let cool to room temperature. 

 

Heat oven to 400°F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

 

Add minced Eggs and Dill, gently mix well.


 

Lay out an egg roll wrapper, moisten two edges with water.  Scoop about ⅓ of a cup of the Cabbage Mixture on the wrapper, offset from center towards the moisten half.  Fold other side over to form a triangle and press edges to seal.

Place on baking sheet.  

 

Bake for 15 minutes, flip over, bake another 15 minutes or to desired doneness.  Remove from oven, let cool a few minutes.  Enjoy.

 

Variations:

Soy Sauce could be added to adjust seasoning.

 

Ground Beef seasoned with Salt, Pepper, and Dill, cooked, crumbled, and well drained can be added to the Cabbage Mixture.

 

Roll as regular Egg Rolls.

 

Use Wonton Wrappers to make a smaller version. (which could be cooked as potstickers)

 

Deep fry instead of baking.

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Breakfast

 

Breakfast Casserole

 

Makes 6 servings

 

Ingredients

1 dozen eggs

1/2 C cream 

2 C grated cheese of your choice (We use cheddar)

1 pound thick cut bacon sliced into 1/2" strips

8 ounces Crimini mushrooms cleaned and sliced

3 stalks green onion chopped fine

2 T butter

 

Utensils

Disposable non stick cake pan (Must be non-stick)

 

Optional

2C brown and serve potatoes/hashbrowns cooked

Optional 2

1 C chopped fresh spinach

 

Pre-heat oven to 350f

Cook the bacon and drain in on paper towels

Saute' the mushrooms and onions in the butter until soft

Beat the eggs and cream until well beaten

Layer the bottom of the cake pan in the following order:  potatoes, bacon, mushrooms, cheese.  Pour the egg mixture on top and bake for 45 minutes.

 

{Just made it with the spinach and it was wonderful.}

 

Breakfast_Casserole.jpg

Edited by Calamity Kris
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Tonight’s repast required me to skip lunch. Which I did albeit with some reluctance. But it was worth it. 7 hour crockpot pineapple habañero chicken, fresh cornbread, mixed veggies and a gravy made from the broth the chicken simmered in all day.

In keeping with the pineapple theme, I scooped out  half a pineapple, diced the innards and sautéed it in butter and brown sugar. Adding a bit of Ron Zacapa 23 dark rum. Into the hollowed out shell went scoops of Vanilla ice cream. Then the still simmering mélange wa poured over it. Kind of a tropical hot fudge sundae... without the fudge. 
Quite tasty. This is how I eat pineapple. Not on a dang pizza! 

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