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Question for C&B Shooters


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I have been shooting C&B revolvers for many years in CAS.  All my revolvers have been steel framed and have experienced no problems. I have been told by some (non CAS) shooters that brass frame have a tendency to stretch over time.

 

I'm looking at a pair of brass framed .44 1851 Navy revolvers. But am leery of the bass frames.  

 

Anyone out there have experience with them and how to they

hold up to a lot of shooting

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You can shoot hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of rounds threw one before you ever have a issue.

Just don't load them Hot .

It will happen faster .

Rooster

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Keep your BP load around 22 grains and they most likely will last forever. I Have several of which one pair is my favorite, that pair has shot many matches over the years.

Tully

 

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Bitterroot shoot mild loads??  You want the earth to tip off its axis???  :lol:

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Now Blackwater, you know I've toned down my loads over the last couple of years.  Even T Bone doesn't complain about them hurting his ear plugs anymore (or it may be he found complaining was useless).

 

You going to make the Crap Shoot  this year?

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46 minutes ago, Bitterroot Jake, SASS #9532 said:

 

 

You going to make the Crap Shoot  this year?


 

I’m planning on it.  If that foot cooperates, I’ll be there!!

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I had a work friend (non-cas) tell me he stretched the brass frame of a c&b revolver.  Fred loved to shoot but was not anything cas.  If anyone every had tendency to shoot something at max load, it was Fred.  It can happen.  I am not sure of gun maker, but I remember it was an 1851.

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The frame does not actually stretch.  Take the wedge out of a Colt and fire the gun.  What happens?  The barrel goes sailing down range.  The only thing holding the barrel to the frame is the arbor and the wedge.  On brass frame guns repeated firings (i.e., lots) with heavy loads and the bullet slamming into the forcing cone can pull on the arbor and compress the threads where the arbor screws into the frame. This allows the arbor to pull away from the frame and the wedge can no longer hold the barrel in place.

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Let me add another way (besides Pettifogger's explanation) the brassers can "stretch": There is a narrow raised ring of metal on the recoil shield that the cylinder rotates against. As the cylinder slams rearward when fired that brass ring, over time, can get indented by the steel cylinder which allows the cylinder to move more and more rearward. This opens up the cylinder gap and appears to stretch the frame but in reality it is the frame (raised recoil ring) that is getting compressed (squashed). When inspecting a used brass framed Colt you need to note how far the wedge is driven inward  and if there is an excess cylinder gap when you pull the cylinder rearward. Knock it apart and feel to see if the cylinder pin is wobbly and take a look at the recoil ring. If battered by heavy loads it will show the impression of the back of the cylinder. I've seen some makes of brass frames that had thinner rings which showed the battering easily. If the gun has a tight gap, and none of the above signs it is GTG.  I often wonder why they don't make bronze frames which is a harder alloy and the guns should last longer. A brass framed Remington can also "stretch" but it is almost entirely due to recoil shield battering by the back of the cylinder. It is easily visible with the cylinder removed and takes longer to happen.

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11 hours ago, Hellgate #3302 L said:

I often wonder why they don't make bronze frames which is a harder alloy and the guns should last longer.

I'm guessing it's for appearance's sake as the brass is bright and shiny which might be more appealing to the novelty buyer. I'm also guessing the buyers of these pistols don't shoot them much so it's not much of an issue for them.

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On 1/10/2022 at 9:05 AM, Bitterroot Jake, SASS #9532 said:

Now Blackwater, you know I've toned down my loads over the last couple of years.  Even T Bone doesn't complain about them hurting his ear plugs anymore (or it may be he found complaining was useless).

 

You going to make the Crap Shoot  this year?

 

What is this Crap Shoot you speak of?

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2 minutes ago, Tequila Shooter said:

 

What is this Crap Shoot you speak of?


It’s the first shoot of the year at Ponderosa Pines, the home of the Kentucky State Match and The Black Gold Shootout!  It happens in March!!

 

Stay tuned for details forthcoming!!

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We call it the “Crap Shoot” because you never know what the weather is going to be like, but we’re shootin’ anyway!!

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I don’t like brass framed percussion revolvers.  I’ve been beaten several times by Frontiersmen using them.

 

:ph34r:

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The first CB pistol I bought used at a gun show. Took it to the range and loaded it up. I fired it at a 25 yd target and was surprised that it hit near the ten ring. When I cocked it for the shot it took more effort than I expected. I fired it again and had another good hit. When I went to cock it the cylinder would not turn. I found a lead ball jammed between the loading rod and the cylinder.  Figured the ball hadn't been seated good and moved forward. Repositioned the cylinder and seated the ball. When I fired again with another good hit, a lead ball fell out of the pistol. After looking it over I eventually discovered all the chambers had been fired. The ring on the recoil shield was flatten to the point that when the pistol fired the cylinder slammed backwards smacking the bottom nipple and cap against the recoil shield and firing it. I was surprised that the double discharges did not harm the gun or me. I didn't even realize the bottom chamber fired.

 

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