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Oregon Trail


Subdeacon Joe

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https://www.smithsonianmag.com/travel/follow-relics-oregon-trail-180960589/?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=socialmedia&fbclid=IwAR0eUXP7MLqFQINnMCQUbqcVRBiMTqbMHr1pUw5_2972tEyQyYL138Sbt2I

 

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The trail itself—all 2,170 miles of it—was braved by more than 400,000 people between 1840 and 1880. Weighed down with wagons and their pesonal possessions, the pioneers that dared travel the Oregon Trail slowly helped build the United States' western half. The trail began in Independence, Missouri, and continued to the Willamette Valley in Oregon, where pioneers could decide to either stay put or continue north or south and settle.

As the Oregon Trail evolved, thousands of wagons wore ruts into the ground that acted as an ad-hoc road for the settlers who followed. But they didn’t follow a single solid path. Rather, wagon wheels left ruts across the country as pioneers found various shortcuts and easier routes along the way. Many of those ruts still exist today, though some of them are in danger of destruction as municipalities push to stretch bigger and better power supplies across the region.

 

So caulk those wagons and get ready to ford the river. Follow this modern-day journey, stopping to see trail relics along the way—with no need to worry about typhoid fever or dysentery.

 

Alcove Spring (Blue Rapids, Kansas)

Alcove Springs was a stop along the Oregon Trail / California Trail near - Blue Rapids, Kansas.  The Donner Party camped at her from May 26-30 1846

SaveUS military Into - NASA, History, LH Reenactor, Food, Music, Movies, The Great Outdoors, All Things Vintage, Old Time Radio & UA SportsPublished bySteven Cone

This spot’s unique rock formations, waterfall, and natural spring were a favorite stopping point for pioneers after crossing the Big Blue River. Many wanted to leave their mark and carved their names into the rocks around the spring—including Edwin Bryant, a member of the famously doomed Donner-Reed Party. According to Bryant, his group actually named the area “Alcove Springs” and carved the name into the rocks and surrounding tree trunks.

 

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27 minutes ago, Smuteye John SASS#24774 said:

Got killed by a bear once, too

Well if you had been carrying a Beretta 25 automatic, like all smart outdoorsman do, you could have shot your buddy in the knee and made your escape while the bear was eating your friend.

 

I thunked everbody knew that.

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this oddly sounds like a lady going through a divorce discussion with soon to be ex that encountered an alligator , but surely im mistaken 

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8 hours ago, Alpo said:

Well if you had been carrying a Beretta 25 automatic, like all smart outdoorsman do, you could have shot your buddy in the knee and made your escape while the bear was eating your friend.

 

I thunked everbody knew that.

 

14 minutes ago, watab kid said:

this oddly sounds like a lady going through a divorce discussion with soon to be ex that encountered an alligator , but surely im mistaken 

 

A great idea "bears" repeating!:P

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Hard to appreciate the courage those pioneers had.  How bad their lives had to be to take the risks of making a transcontinental trip in a wagon!  We’ve seen them in movies and TV programs but I don’t think I could have done what they did.  
 

My heartfelt admiration and thanks to those who dared to travel the Oregon Trail.

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4 minutes ago, J-BAR #18287 said:

Hard to appreciate the courage those pioneers ha

 

Around here in Sonoma County you can see houses 130 years old,  maybe older, out on the flats, surrounded by nice trees for shade.  I've heard people comment about at least having shade.  I'll point out that when they were built, and wasn't that a job of work, those trees weren't there, and weren't of a size to shade the house for decades. 

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3 minutes ago, watab kid said:

no intent to make light of the OP as i too respect those that originally populated what we now call the US ...all of them , 

 

What are you talking about??? 

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My wife and I have followed the Oregon Trail at different times from Chimney Rock to Casper, WY. and from Fort Hall, ID to Oregon City.  We also followed the California Trail from Wells, NV to Sacramento, CA.  We did a small part of the Santa Fe Trail from Santa Fe to Springer then we turned off and headed up towards the Raton Pass.

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18 hours ago, watab kid said:

this oddly sounds like a lady going through a divorce discussion with soon to be ex that encountered an alligator , but surely im mistaken 

You are mistaken.  She chose a reliable piece with easy readily available ammunition.  A little Ruger 22.

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I have a family line (the Eoffs) that broke away from St. Louis to take the Oregon Trail.  The Old family cemetery in Oregon was found with a few headstones still standing and is currently surrounded by a residential subdivision.

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