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ROC Clarification - Action Closing on Long Gun


Blackjack Zak

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Don't know 100%

But of the clubs I am a member.

I trust them.

Most take a vote of the members on how they want them to vote.

 

If I have any questions on it. I will just walk up and ask them HOW DID YOU VOTE ON THIS.

 

I am lucky in that there are some GOOD TG's around here.

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You can walk away from a cocked long gun but can't take you hand off a cocked pistol. Not arguing just answering PWB question

 

If you take your hand(s) off a cocked/loaded/action closed long gun, the penalty is the same SDQ for doing so with a revolver.

That will be added to the list in the next version of the RO1 "Penalty Overview".

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PWB I might not under stand your answer so please bare with me. If a shot empty pistol is left cocked when returned to leather that is a sdq. If a cocked long gun is placed down with action closed on spent round I thought that was a msv and a live round would produce the sdq. Forgive me for not looking this up I am freezing my butt off in a tree stand. Thanks

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Please note that I specified "cocked/LOADED/action closed"...i.e. live round chambered under the hammer.

 

This is also mentioned in the OP (#3)

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Pete, the new rule deals with a rifle whose action was opened but inadvertently gets closed in the process of re-staging. I have never seen a pistol hammer get cocked inadvertently.

 

Furthermore, long guns are restaged with barrels pointed in a safe direction, pistols are generally restaged in the holster often sweeping the shooter as it's being done.

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(Most Wanted quoted) P.S . KK , I am going to assume that you did vote (but not for Obama) and even though it did'nt go your way you have never discussed the outcome in a less than positive way .

 

As matter as fact no, because it's really not productive and a waste of oxygen, but I do voice my opinion prior to the vote, if it goes my way cool, if not I work with it, example we have clubs that don't use all the SASS rules, just for example loading a shotgun on the move, complaining after the vote is like going to that club and complaining knowing darn well what the rules before getting there it's un-productive and a waste of time.

 

KK

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PWB My context is post 71 & 72. If the pistol goes down cocked and empty. Do we have a conflict between the pistol rule and the new rifle rule.

No just different.

 

KK

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PECOS I have got to ask, looking at your number you have been playing this game much longer than I and this just now is a concern? First a cocked pistol returned to the leather is a SDQ why exactlly I'm sure the ROC can explain. A cocked rifle and I assuming with lever closed and empty has been a MSV why the difference can't tell you both rules were in place before my venture in SASS and I have Never questioned it and I still don't. Two completely different firearms with different rules thats all I can say.

 

KK

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Nothing has been answered anywhere. None of this has or ever had anything to do with where whaterver was pointed. Make it simple. Rifle and pistol returned to table- all pointed downrange - both hammer back and action closed on rifle. Why would one be treated differently than the other.

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Nothing has been answered anywhere. None of this has or ever had anything to do with where whaterver was pointed. Make it simple. Rifle and pistol returned to table- all pointed downrange - both hammer back and action closed on rifle. Why would one be treated differently than the other.

 

That HAS been addressed re: the difference in how to make a cocked long gun safe vs a revolver.

If the rifle is found have an unfired round in the chamber upon opening, the penalty is the same SDQ as for a cocked revolver leaving the shooter's hand (ammo status unknown)

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Pecos you should have added that the rifle and the pistol both had spent brass in them . I think I understand what you are getting at and you want someone from the ROC to explain why a rifle sitting on a table , pointed into the berm , cocked with action closed on spent brass is a msv and a pistol in the exact same condition is a sdq . Pecos is that right or am I also missing your point .

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Pecos you should have added that the rifle and the pistol both had spent brass in them . I think I understand what you are getting at and you want someone from the ROC to explain why a rifle sitting on a table , pointed into the berm , cocked with action closed on spent brass is a msv and a pistol in the exact same condition is a sdq . Pecos is that right or am I also missing your point .

 

"...ammo status unknown" and how the firearm must be handled to ascertain that status are the two main reason that revolvers are treated differently than long guns.

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Nothing has been answered anywhere. None of this has or ever had anything to do with where whaterver was pointed. Make it simple. Rifle and pistol returned to table- all pointed downrange - both hammer back and action closed on rifle. Why would one be treated differently than the other.

Pete,

 

Respectfully, nothing has really changed, except that, upon opening, if the chamber on a long gun is empty, it's a no call. All the same penalties apply if there are fired or unfired rounds in the gun. Reflect on what happened to the shooter prior to this new rule. Shooters have put their guns down with the action closed before this rule went into effect, and penalties were assessed whether the gun was empty or not. I have come back to a closed gun at the end of a stage and paid the price, now there's a chance that it might not add time.

 

CR

 

Edit - Got interrupted and PWB beat me to it.

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Alvin you are exactly right and that's where the frustration comes from. Red Cent uses the term "low badge disease", I think more as high post number disease. I should know better. I surrender.

Hello Pete,

 

I did a search on "low badge disease," as I thought it sounded negative (disease!). The only post I found with this term was yours. Help! Would you show me the post you are writing about?

 

Thanks,

 

Allie

 

PS I could have "high post number disease..." :unsure::o;):ph34r:

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This also eliminate having to determine if the action is closed or ALMOST closed.

As a TO we had to examine the action. If it was ALMOST closed it was a no call. If it was closed it was a MSV. (provided there were no expended rounds in the chamber or on the carrier)

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