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The wind, she did blow


Alpo

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We had a small storm here the other day. Since it did not start in the Gulf or the Atlantic it didn't qualify as a hurricane. It was a thunderstorm. With 120 mph gusts.

 

We had a hurricane 6 years ago, and one of the results was just about everybody got a new roof. Including me.

 

I wanted a tin roof. But they didn't seem to be anybody doing tin roofs. Just shingles. So my choice was not between tin and shingles, but was instead between shingles and blue tarp. So I got shingles.

 

While walking the dog yesterday I saw six tarped roofs. And every one of them was tin. As one guy explained it to me, the wind got under the edge and just rolled it back. I guess it's a good thing I got shingles.

 

 

I'm sure everybody has heard about storms being so fierce that it would stick a piece of pine straw in a tree trunk.

 

How about it would stick a piece of plywood in a tree?

 

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120 mph winds yikes!!! We had 50 -60 wind gusts yesterday, sustained winds of 20-25 and there was some damage and some power outages. Mostly old trees getting knocked down into power lines. 

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The steel roofs on my home and my shop are rated to withstand 130 mph winds as required by codes!

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4 hours ago, Blackwater 53393 said:

The steel roofs on my home and my shop are rated to withstand 130 mph winds as required by codes!

i was going to bring this up - most "tin" , actually steel roofs are rated far over shingles but the codes vary across the country based on 'normal' weather , a storm that approaches hurricane forces are rare in many areas , kinda like snow loads - here we get heavy snows regularly our codes require designs for a lot more than those in missouri or louisiana , same with footing depths because frost goes deeper where its colder , im in the 42" code but 30 miles north of me its 60" minimum , you can look all this up - the UBC [universal building code] sets the parameters but in most cases i would elect to exceed that just because of those rare storms ....its all about the cost tho , 

 

BTW your steel roof is only as goot as the structure its attached to and the attachment system it was installed with , 

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House across the street had a new tin roof put on it so they could sell it. About 6 months before the hurricane. Along came Michael and rolled it up like a carpet.

 

About half a mile down the road this old couple put a new tin roof on their house so they could sell it. And that was the first thing the new owners had to do was reroof the house cause Michael took it off.

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a hurricane will do that - better to reroof than to rebuild from destruction , but then we are talking catastrophic event here so what do you expect ? a normal storm wont do that , 

 

ive not got a dog in the fight really as i dont have either shingles or "tin" , i have a commercial fully adhered EPDM roof on my home and garage , ive suffered 90mph straight lined winds with no issue here so far , im not in the path of a hurricane but might see a tornado in an isolated situation , we shall see if it lives up to its rating of near 150mph , 

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High winds are pretty amazing!

Yesterday I drove through Cramer's Junction on Hwys 58 and 395 in the California Mojave Desert.  I stopped at the Chevron station to fuel my pickup. While I was fueling, I heard a loud series of bangs above the shrieking wind.   About 20' of the raised seam steel roof above me peeled back, broke loose and slammed into the side of the adjacent convenience store.  I don't know the official wind speed, but it rocked my F250 truck side to side  8 or so inches. 

After returning to Hwy 58 and proceeding west, I saw two small travel trailers on their side on the shoulder.    

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ive always found these winds far more devestating than lightning strikes - but then when i say that i did have a lightning strike that killed a lot of electronics once , killed my bose and three TVs as well as some other appliances in the house - didnt even realize it happened at the time , just thought it a normal power outage , that occurs periodially when a squil finds the right contacts on the transformer out front , had one cook itself this past week , 

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Those metal roofs failed because they were not properly fastened down.  Most installers fail to properly secure the edges and seams.  They think that because the metal is stiffer than shingles that there is no need for additional fasteners along the edges.

 

Another issue is that the metal used is not always up to snuff. The thickness of the metal is important.

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Had a tornado last summer. Damaged a couple of buildings a couple miles away. No damage to our house, but four of our 37 year old spruce trees were uprooted, as were over 1,000 trees along the ajacent parkway!

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