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jpy15026

Snap Caps vs Spent cartridges

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Just a thought for dry fire practice,would spent empty cartridges with spent primer intact work like dummy rounds or snap caps?

Inquiring minds want to know

jpy15026

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Fired cases have no cushion effect on the FP or hammer like a 'snap-cap' does.

OLG

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Ditto OLG. The “primer” on a snap cap bounces back. A real primer in a spent case stays crushed when crushed.

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Very little protection offered by a fired cartridge.  The primer has already been deformed away from the firing pin strike.  The hammer hits the bolt/frame just as hard as if chamber is empty. 

 

You can make your own snap caps by gluing the right size mechanical pencil eraser into primer pocket of brass.   Add a slug for easy chambering.  In rifles, file a notch out of the rim if you don't want to extract the dummy every time you cycle the action.

 

Good luck, GJ

 

 

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Drill out the primer pocket slightly smaller than the diameter of the pocket so that it has a lip at the bottom.

 

Go to the Auto Parts or Ranch & Home store and get a o-ring that is the same diameter as the primer pocket.  Make sure the o-ring is Burna-70 or harder. Don't get a silicone o-ring they are too soft. you want one that is made of hard rubber.

Cut the O-ring and stuff one end into the primer pocket until it is protruding past the lip and sticking into the case.  Cut flush with a razor blade. You will never wear it out.

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Most of the folks don't use anything. Just dry fire away. What guns? 

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I have a  Ruger 357 Blackhawk,Ruger .357 Bisley and a Uberti cattleman .357,and in the market for a .22 cal Revolver for even more fun

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Do not dry fire a 22 rimfire!

 

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3 hours ago, jpy15026 said:

I have a  Ruger 357 Blackhawk,Ruger .357 Bisley and a Uberti cattleman .357,and in the market for a .22 cal Revolver for even more fun

I would use snap-caps in the Rugers to help reduce the chance of braking the t'bar.

OLG

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I never "dry fired " a gun in my life until I got 'back into" guns a couple of years ago and bought a few Glocks (striker fired) and was told you can dry fire all you want,I guess that's true with striker fires, but still stands true..... never dry fire a revolver,yes?

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Guest Texas jack Black SASS#9362
22 hours ago, The Original Lumpy Gritz said:

I would use snap-caps in the Rugers to help reduce the chance of braking the t'bar.

OLG

 No t-bars in mine 

 

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Replacing firing pins in revolvers is usually not a task for kitchen table gunsmiths.  So why not save your firing pins, recoil plates, springs, and receivers and each year just spend twenty bucks on a good quality set of commercially made and rated/tested snap caps? 

This really may not be a wise place to try to skrimp on a few dollars.  

And yes, they do need replacing periodically.  

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IMHO, very few snap caps are genuinely any good. 

 

I have had a brand new Sig Sauer break the firing pin placement pin shear even with one in place.  I have also read the spring cushioned ones don't hold up or provide enough spring to do much good and may still allow the over extension of the firing pin (free floating pins).

 

Check and see, many off the ones with the rubber "eraser like" soft primer are bowed inward, providing any real cushion.  I just bought a set of 18 for my Rugers (for piece of mind), and personally tested each one for any "cushion" at the end of the hammer strike.  Only 12 out of the 18 (high end) barely had any cushion for the FP.

 

And yes, you can dry fire Glocks from now until doomsday, and the only result will be a better, smoother (for a Glock) trigger pull.

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IMO, snap cap use makes sense.  I like those made by  A-ZOOM for my 38/357 FAs.  I do believe they are a little overpriced but in the long run, good for my peace-of-mind and hopefully for preserving life of some parts.  However, other than having the appearance of a cartridge in plastic or very light metal form, they seem to just have a silicone cushion for firing pin to hit.  If that is the true advantage of the A-ZOOMs, what would be the disadvantage of using  a spent case with primer removed then pocket filled with silicone?  Just asking?  One could add bullet and/or put paint/marks for caution and identification.    (Silicone in primer pocket is what I use in making  my shotgun dummies for dry firing...along with some weight inside and often a piece of wood dowel in end with more silicone to seal.)

 

https://www.amazon.com/ZOOM-Special-Snap-Cap-16118/dp/B0014VVI1E/ref=sr_1_2?crid=JFXS9SO5TSMD&keywords=a-zoom+38+special+snap+cap&qid=1553954941&s=sporting-goods&sprefix=A-zoom+38%2Csporting%2C1669&sr=1-2

 

https://www.amazon.com/ZOOM-16318-Revolver-Special-Packsage/dp/B07DP44RGB/ref=sr_1_3?crid=JFXS9SO5TSMD&keywords=a-zoom+38+special+snap+cap&qid=1553955003&s=sporti

 

Also offered by many other sources...Brownells, Lyman, Midway, Cabellas, etc

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No need for anything in the Rugers.

Copied from the Ruger New Vaquero Manual:

 

"DRY-FIRING: Going through the actions of cocking, aiming, and pulling the trigger of an unloaded gun is known as “Dry Firing.” It can be useful to learn the “feel” of your revolver. Be certain the revolver is unloaded and that the gun is pointing in a safe direction even when practicing by dry-firing. The Ruger® new model single-action revolvers can be dry-fired without damage to the firing pin or other components."

 

Colt style ie. Uberti, Pietta, all those with firing pins in hammer, should not be dry fired!

The primer acts as the "stop" for the hammer, dry firing may damage the firing pin, hammer, or recoil shield!

 

Not sure, but i believe any rifle with a free flouting firing pin should not be dry fired. Use snap caps, spent cases have the same effect as empty.

 

My 2 cents

Asa

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