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Bison Bud

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About Bison Bud

  • Birthday 09/24/1953

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  • SASS #
    36614
  • SASS Affiliated Club
    Hooten Old Town

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    phil.bud.compton@gmail.com
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  • Yahoo
    bud.compton@yahoo.com

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Grant's Lick, Kentucky
  • Interests
    Firearms, Boats, Motorcycles, Electronics

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Bison Bud's Achievements

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  1. While I can see the need for a grease cookie with some bullets (those not able to carry enough lube), proper BP loads have a full case of powder and use a bit of compression when seating the bullet. Both the .45 Colt and the 44/40 were originally BP cartridges and why someone would need to download them by using a filler is beyond me. Maybe using a filler in some of the larger rifle cartridges may be worth the effort, but I have to doubt the advantage of using a filler in a pistol cartridge. I guess your trying to cut down on smoke, but that's just part of the fun in my eyes. Why make something so simple into something so convoluted in the first place?
  2. Thanks Johnny! My personal experience was with the 311 and I guess I should have looked it up before posting. However, I never would have dreamed that it was made by Baikal.
  3. I started out with a Stevens 311 SXS and it was a stout, double trigger shotgun. However, I never liked the locking lug on the breech plate, between the two chambers, and it was a bear to get it to stay open for loading and unloading. I'm thinking that the 411 is basically the single trigger model of the 311, but I could be wrong. In any case, if it is of the same design it can be fixed to stay open, but that locking lug is something one would have to get used to for sure. At least in my opinion there are better, yet still affordable choices out there. Good luck and good shooting to all.
  4. Almost 4 years back now, I shot a local match that unexpectedly became my last one, at least for now (I keep hoping and working towards being able return). I was in good form that day and actually won overall (Lassiter didn't show up that day). So, I went out on top, but I sure didn't expect to end up in the hospital a week later with an infected knee implant. This infection and the 4 more knee surgeries required after months of pic-line administered and oral antibiotics, plus shoulder surgeries on both shoulders over the next two years ended my work career much earlier than planned, as well as most of my recreational activities. Frankly, I could have lost my leg with this infection, but what we did save is no where near what it used to be anymore. I can walk un-aided for short distances, but I am slow and need to be careful and deliberate. I generally use a cane for support and balance to get around, but I now wear out very quickly and deal with a lot of pain on a regular basis. Anyway, at 68 years old now, my life was changed forever in what seemed like an instant and I sure didn't see it coming! Anyway, the reason I post this is that no one really knows what the next day will bring and you can be an active and fit individual one day and a complete invalid the next. So, make to most of what you do and enjoy life along the way. If you can get out there and shoot and still enjoy it, then by all means do so. Personally, I am determined to get back to at least one match a month, hopefully starting this coming spring, but there is still a tough row to hoe before I am ready and able. Good luck and good shooting to all!
  5. I live in Northern Kentucky, so a bit far for me, but it's sounds like great fun. There used to be an indoor rimfire match near Dayton, Ohio that was one of the first matches I ever shot. We didn't shoot the shotgun, but it was still a heck of a good time and I wish it was still going. Have fun, be safe, and thanks for letting folks know about this indoor option!
  6. I'd be willing to bet that there will not be a one piece firing pin or a half cock safety!
  7. I cut my 28" Baikal field gun to 24" primarily to get rid of the two different chokes and I have never had any problems handling the gun around props. etc. I also have a 28" Miroku SXS that I just couldn't bring myself to cut and I have no problems handling it around props either. Frankly, I think the whole shorter is faster thing is more than a bit overstated! It's more about what you get used to using than how short a barrel you use. However, folks do seem to expect the 20" barrel on a "Coach Gun," but I'd bet more Cowpokes had longer barreled shotguns for multi-purpose use than these specific use guns. Good luck and good shooting to all.
  8. While I don't know what all went on, it's obvious that these Hollywood Numbskulls broke pretty much all the basic firearms safety rules. Muzzle control is everything, followed by considering any gun as loaded (even when you know it is not). Frankly, I think that any of us with firearms training and experience would have checked the gun ourselves rather than trust someone else and under no circumstance would we be pointing it at anyone, much less pulling the trigger while doing so. Most of these Hollywood Numbskulls are anti-gun in the first place and should be required to get firearms training before even touching a real gun. Actually using a real gun as a prop is a bad idea anyway, at least in my opinion, but having live rounds on the set is insanity and it now appears that they were even using this gun for live fire target practice prior to the accident. Geese, just how stupid can you get! I think they all are criminally negligent and hope they all get sued for everything they are worth and serve time in jail. Accidents do happen, but being a movie star or producer shouldn't give one a free pass when it comes to something like this!
  9. While not as popular as 12 ga. many folks shoot 20 ga doubles for cowboy action. As to effectiveness, many folks also load their 12 ga. shells down to 20 ga specs. with 12 ga. - 7/8 oz. loads being fairly common. I'm not sure I'd buy a shotgun just because I have some shells already loaded, but agree with the others here in that if you like the gun and can get it for a reasonable price, then go for it. Parkers are generally dang fine shotguns, maybe a bit too fine for cowboy, at least in my opinion. Good luck and good shooting to all.
  10. Everyone likes recognition and has an ego, some just handle it better than others. Why do you think we have so many different categories in the first place?
  11. I agree that Hodgdon would probably either tell you to throw it out or not want to get involved at all. In any case, the chances of them telling you it is safe to use are slim to none even if they could confirm the difference between to older and newer manufacture. In any case, probably best to just take the loss and not take any chances. Yeah, it's a real shame to waste components with them being so scarce, but it's not worth it in my opinion. Good luck and good shooting to all.
  12. At this point, I wouldn't be too picky. Any primer is better than no primer even if you have to reinstall the original hammer springs to get consistent ignition! I agree that historically the Federals have been the softest and most reliable, but I've loaded virtually every kind available over the years and had very few misfires with any of them. I currently have a decent supply of CCI large pistol primers on hand, but bought them at least 4 years ago and doubt that they are the new production that is supposed to be more sensitive. However, the fact that they even stated that they have been improved shows that the older ones were harder than they needed to be, so any move to improve that has to be a good thing for those with lighter hammer springs. Anyway, my point is that if CCI primers become available and you have the need, then I'd jump on them before they are gone. Personally, I still have enough to wait for prices and supplies to stabilize a bit more and plan to wait and see how things shake out, but I can't hold out forever either! Good luck and good shooting to all.
  13. You probably get more exposure from the primers we use than while casting. Inhalation is the primary exposure hazard with lead, although some can be absorbed through the skin, it is very small in comparison to the inhalation danger. Frankly, the lead staphinate in the primers is very easy (almost unavoidable) to inhale while shooting and is also a danger in the vibratory brass cleaners we use. However, good ventilation is a must when casting and try not to overheat the pot as that will cause more vaporization as well. I generally cast outside on the back patio and still use a fan to move the air from the pot away from me. No eating or smoking during casting sessions and as other have already mentioned, washing your hands is a must before doing so. In fact, a full body shower and change of clothes, after a casting session would be a good thing if your really concerned about your exposure level. Good luck and good shooting to all.
  14. Mr Spade is correct about the newer AA hulls being a two piece design now. I much preferred the original one piece hulls and they did last quite a bit longer. However, in either case reloading them just once would be a waste. Black powder loads may be a different story as they do tend to get scorched, but I've loaded smokeless at least a dozen times without issues. Try not to mix the two hull designs as they do have a bit different load specs, especially with wad spacing. I generally sort them by using a flashlight, (the two piece hulls have a cup installed in the bottom that shows up well with the flashlight) but I am now down to pretty much two piece hulls anyway. If your going to reload them just once, then I'd be glad to give you a fair price for them as twice fired!
  15. Generally speaking, you should be okay with the .38 special load in .357 Mag brass unless the original .38 load is very light to start with. The extra volume in the .357 case does have an effect and a really light load may not completely burn, get really sooty, or even stick a bullet in the longer barrel. All in all, it would be good to check the .357 load data for your choice of powder and if you have to bump the charge up a bit to meet the minimum listed load, then I would recommend doing so.
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