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Lead Levels Revisited


Dang It Dan 13202

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Almost ten years ago I was shocked to learn that my lead levels were high enough for concern.  I went through two rounds of Chelation, started taking a daily dose of vitamin C, started using gloves whenever I used a solvent to clean my guns and started wearing a dust mask when I cleaned my brass.  All of these things have been discussed here in the past so there is nothing new about that.

 

BUT....two years ago, my lead level was 14 (nothing to worry about) but I still wasn't happy.  So, I stopped running the timer.  My lead level as of yesterday is 8.

 

Now I am not telling you not to run the timer but I am suggesting that you share that duty with more folks.  Run four or five then GET OFF THE LINE and away from the smoke.

 

And, get tested.  It's better to know than to hope.

 

Dang It Dan

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My level was 13 last July. I don't run the timer as often. However, I haven't shot since November

 

My thought is most lead dust comes from shotgun targets. 

 

Most ranges face north. Our wind blows from NW, pretty much blows dust back into our face.

 

The closer the targets the closer we are to fragments and lead dust. Maybe a couple more yards of distance would allow the dust to settle before it reaches the shooters. 

 

Others may have differing opinions.

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Maybe set the shotgun knockdowns under a sprinkler to trap the lead particles in the air?  :P

 

Seriously, yes, I think our close shotgun targets (and the lead from primer ignition as rounds are fired) are the main sources for most of us.

 

good luck, GJ

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5 minutes ago, Rip Snorter said:

ionizing ring built into the hat brim

 

Doesn't your halo do that already?

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1 hour ago, Garrison Joe, SASS #60708 said:

 

Doesn't your halo do that already?

What hair?:(

Edit: Misread - To have a Halo, I'd need to be a lot more patient, swear less, and generally be less raffish!

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One of the reasons I quit dry tumbling brass was to avoid breathing the dust.  Also, wash hands and mouth after shooting, reloading or even handling ammo.

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4 minutes ago, The Original Lumpy Gritz said:

You folks with high lead count.....

How many of you dry tumble your cases?

OLG 

I now wet tumble.  The other biggy was shooting indoors.  I now wear a respirator when I shoot indoors.

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4 minutes ago, The Original Lumpy Gritz said:

You folks with high lead count.....

How many of you dry tumble your cases?

OLG 

 I have a couple very large dry tumblers. Only tumble a few times a year, I have a lot of brass.

And, I open the tumbler and separate next to a commercial exhaust fan. 

 

I ran the clock for years at most matches. The new shooters need the experience. 

I've backed off on the number of matches I attend. Use to average 36 matches a year. We'll see when I get my next blood test.

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1 minute ago, Assassin said:

 I have a couple very large dry tumblers. Only tumble a few times a year, I have a lot of brass.

And, I open the tumbler and separate next to a commercial exhaust fan. 

 

I ran the clock for years at most matches. The new shooters need the experience. 

I've backed off on the number of matches I attend. Use to average 36 matches a year. We'll see when I get my next blood test.

Wear a mask when you open the tumbler and while you separate the brass.

Lots of lead dust from the primers.

OLG 

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4 hours ago, Marauder SASS #13056 said:

Assassin should wear a mask whenever in public! 

:D:D:D

Yeah, so y'all won't be so jealous of my boyish good looks.

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 If you eat foods that are natural chelators you will have nothing to worry about. I dry tumble ,eat in my reloading room etc and my lead levels are at 8-10 

 Eat healthy

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Sometimes, it's the little things that can make all the difference, and your advice is certainly good advice for a great many folks.

 

For me personally, the single most important aspect of keeping my lead levels in check is to make sure I wash my hands thoroughly after handling lead or shooting before eating anything.  It is something that I tend to forget from time to time, but I don't shoot anywhere as much as you guys in Florida.  You all probably shoot as much in a Month as I do in a Season!  :P

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My lead level was pretty constant around 8 since I started asking for lead tests when I had a physical exam.  It was 8 in April of 2021.

 

I had it tested again at the end of August and it had jumped up to 27.  I do run the timer but have been doing so for years, so that had not changed. I had switched to wet tumbling about five years ago and have always been careful about not eating while shooting or reloading.  
 

What had changed was my diet.  About three weeks before that high result I started a ketogenic diet and immediately began shedding body fat.  I had dropped about 15-20 pounds by the time of the test.

 

I had my levels checked again this month and I am back down to 11.  My guess is that some of the lead had accumulated in abdominal fat or liver fat that my body was eliminating or burning and the test showed the lead on its way out of my system.

 

After that spike I took a break from running the timer but I had crept back into it.  We are not overloaded with RO2 certified shooters in my home club.

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