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Hoss

WTC frontiersman

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Posted (edited)

Shooter had a cap not pop. 5th round. He went around, cocking/decocking using both hands until he brought the cylinder back into position. Fired the shot with one hand 
I know decocking is not allowed without permission from TO. But frontiersman are allowed to use off hand to manipulate cylinder as needed. 
 

no call was made. But I’m not sure that was correct? (For the record, I was as LT, not a spotter or TO). 
 

im my opinion, there was no safety issue involved. And TO was obviously aware of the cocking/decocking. But I’m not sure this would be considered the proper procedure. 

Edited by Hoss

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When it has happened to me, I have just put it on half-cock, and rotated the cylinder with my off-hand.
Honestly, I'm not sure about cocking & decocking to get the cylinder in the correct position, so I will watch this post to here what others (particularly Palewolf) have to say.

--Dawg

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No call. You can use both hands to fix a foul up.

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Quote

 

- No firearm may be de-cocked on the firing line to avoid a penalty if cocked at the wrong time, position or location once a round has gone downrange.

 

SHB p.15

 

Note that a  primary component of the "de-cocking" prohibition is "to avoid a penalty".

(I've added this to the list of suggested edits to the "Penalties Overview" SDQ section)
A "percussionist" attempting to resolve a malfunction (cap failure or jam in the action) should not be penalized for de-cocking while doing so...IMO.
Any "Duelist-style" shooter is also allowed to use both hands to resolve a revolver malfunction (as noted above):

Quote

 

Duelist Style

- Duelist – Duelist style is defined as shooting a revolver cocked and fired onehanded and unsupported.  The revolver, hand, or shooting arm may not be touched by the offhand except when resolving a malfunctioning revolver problem or when transferring the revolver from one hand to the other. 

 

SHB p.6

 

That said, de-cocking would be unnecessary in order to rotate the cylinder to an unfired cap (as Prairie Dawg mentioned)

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Posted (edited)

This issue is where you apply the ROIII learning ( common sense) . C&B shooters aren’t in the habit of dropping the hammer on nipples that are already fired and peening the nipples. The OP says the shooter was using both hands to advance the cylinder which sounds like a methodical slow way to get back to the cap. In my mind, that’s allowed  in this instance.
No reason to be a hard azz at this point, No call IMO. 
Interesting scenario still.
 

 

Edited by Captain Clark
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Looks like a good heads up by the Frontiersman and TO.  Cap and Ball pistols must be cleared on the line.  The lure of shooting Frontiersman, it brings about its own special and unique failures. :rolleyes:

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1 hour ago, Prairie Dawg, SASS #50329 said:

When it has happened to me, I have just put it on half-cock, and rotated the cylinder with my off-hand.
Honestly, I'm not sure about cocking & decocking to get the cylinder in the correct position, so I will watch this post to here what others (particularly Palewolf) have to say.

--Dawg

I shoot plainsman side matches a couple of times a year. Ive done exactly that. 

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19 minutes ago, Captain Clark said:

This issue is where you apply the ROIII learning ( common sense) . C&B shooters aren’t in the habit of dropping the hammer on nipples that are already fired and peening the nipples. The OP says the shooter was using both hands to advance the cylinder which sounds like a methodical slow way to get back to the cap. In my mind, that’s allowed  in this instance.
No reason to be a hard azz at this point, No call IMO. 
Interesting scenario still.
 

 

I knew that was his intention. Just trying to clarify in my mind how to apply the rules. As I said, I saw no safety issue, and no call was made. 

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I've shot cap & ball pistols in SASS since the late 1980s, and have never been penalized for either rotating the cylinder by hand to make a second attempt on a cap, or by cocking and lowering the hammer as I also moved it around, whether by using 2 hands or one.  Frontiersmen need a bit of latitude in clearing such instances.  As Range Officers we should remain mindful of that, keeping safety of everyone in mind.

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Posted (edited)

Another thing to remember is that MANY people, especially under the stress of being on the clock, don’t have the skill to put the revolver on half-cock and accurately turn the cylinder to the correct chamber to re-strike a failed primer or percussion cap.  That’s why they repeatedly cock, lower the hammer, and re-cock the revolver, counting the cambers as they go, until they arrive at the chamber with the failed cap or primer.  Then, they can pull the trigger on it again.
   Nothing wrong with doing that.

   Safely fixing a “broke gun” on the clock.

   No Call.

 

Cat Brules

Edited by Cat Brules

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No Call, that simple

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