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Smiling Wolf

Rem. rolling block question

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I have a Remington rolling block, I was told it is a 7mm Mauser caliber. What ammo can I safely shoot?

 

   Thank You

     S.W.

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FIRST... have a gunsmith check it out to see that it is, in fact, a 7mm Mauser (7x57) AND that it is safe to shoot.

Some Rolling Blocks are quite old and should be inspected by a competent gunsmith.

THEN... 7mm Mauser. In the UK, it is known as a .275 Rigby... so I hear.

Do Not use 7x57mmR which is a rimmed cartridge. Unless of course the GS tells you it is a 7x57mmR.

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Remington 7mm chambers for  7mm Mauser ammo today is different then the 7x57 ammo back then.  So fire form the cases to the chamber before you reload them

If the chamber is too short the breech will not close on a loaded round.
If the chamber is too deep, then you'd have excessive headspace.

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Thank you Gentlemen, I don't know how I double entered this, I think it is just going to become a wall hanger

 

  S.W.

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Friend of mine has one that he shoots, pretty sure it’s current production ammo.  Gunsmith ought to be able to advise you.

 

Seamus

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A good chamber cast and a quality set of calipers will tell you volumes

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You probably have the M1902 Remington Rolling Block.  For a long time when someone checked the chamber with a SAAMI standard headspace gage, they would come up with "excessive headspace" (accepting a NO-GO or even a FIELD gage).  The assumption was that somebody overloaded ammo causing the action to set back. The truth of the matter was/is that the European standard for 7 x 57 (aka 7mm Mauser) is longer than the SAAMI standard.  Usually, it is safe to shoot factory ammo ONCE!  The problem comes when the handloader screws the sizing die down to the "normal" depth for the U.S. cartridge, and then repeats the process after each shot.  The result is usually shortened case life and the possibility of a case head separation!  The solution is to back the sizing die off until the action will just close on the resized case with a little "feel".  Alternatively, buy a neck-sizing die, but still back it off some.

Because the rolling block action is a bit springy, moderate loads should be used.

It is also a good idea to check the receiver for cracks around the pivot pin holes.

Happy New Year!

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One could always get the hornady or sinclair bushing etc to measure a fired case and then adjust one's dies to only push the shoulder back .002 or so.  And as others have stated do not load it hot.

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The 1902 7mm Mauser rolling blocks are cool guns.  They were better heat treated and stronger than the earlier variants (which are quite strong in their own right).  They have an interesting extractor for the rimless cartridge.  As long as the gun is in good shape, you should be able to shoot it.  Check the chamber and the headspace and load accordingly.  
 

I had a nice 7mm rolling block 25-30 years ago and regret selling it.  They made some of these late guns in 30-40 krag. This would be the cat’s meow, but they are quite rare and I have never seen one in person.  I make do with my 50-70 NY state model.  

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What Sedalia Dave sez~!  :)

 

One of the most fun things to do with old rifles (and Remingtons in particular) is determining the chamber dimensions.  You should already have a good set of calipers (dial or digitial).  If you don't, you need one!  Then, one or two bars of Cerrosafe (or suitable alternative) and make a cast of the chamber.  Measure your casting (note the contraction/expansion factor if you wanna be super accurate).  Find the dimensions online (or consult "Cartridges of the World" if you're lucky enough to have a copy) and compare. 

 

Fun stuff!  ^_^

 

Oh... don't have a copy of Cartridges of the World?"  Big file and will take a few minutes, but you can download an interactive version here.  ;)  

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