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Dungannon Gunner

1885 Highwall for BOTH Buffalo and Single Shot Precision

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Long Range rules experts?   Before I start my long range rifle procurement process I want to make sure the one currently holding my interest is legal for BOTH Buffalo and Single shot precision categories. I am looking at the 1885 High Wall in 38-55. Is the 1885 Highwall’s hammer considered “exposed”? Am I correct in thinking I can use this model for smokeless Single shot precision and also if I use Black Powder it would be legal for SASS Buffalo?

Any advice would be appreciated.

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The issue with the '85 is the hammer interfering when you wipe the bore between shots for fouling control.

Have you check'd out a '74 Sharps?

Are you a righty or lefty?

A .45-70 with buck the wind better. ;)

OLG

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23 minutes ago, The Original Lumpy Gritz said:

The issue with the '85 is the hammer interfering when you wipe the bore between shots for fouling control.

Have you check'd out a '74 Sharps?

Are you a righty or lefty?

A .45-70 with buck the wind better. ;)

OLG

This is good info! I am right handed. So lets leave out the Buffalo Black powder consideration. Would the Highwall be good to go for Long Range Single Shot precision?

 

I will also look at the 74

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Many folks shoot the '85.

I would not buy anything till you have done some hands-on live fire.

My favorite LR rifle for BPCR use is a Shiloh #1 in .45-90 w/30" heavy bbl.

I use MVA Soule sight and a MVA #113 on the front with a lollipop type insert.

I only load and shoot real BP and cast my own bullets for it.

These guns shoot their best w/BP......

OLG

 

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The '85 HiWall, 38-55, in the hands of an average marksman is accurate to 300 yds with a good vernier and globe front sight,  For the better marksmen, the caliber is accurate for Mid Range matches (200-300 and 600yds) For 700-800-900 and 1000 yd accuracy, one has to be damn good and have at least a 350gr bullet with the proper reload

So, if one wants to shoot all of the above distances ... 45-70... 500 up to 530gr bullet

And if the hammer is a concern cleaning BP from the chamber ... buy a flexible Delron rod (they can be twisted into a circle)

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More great information.. Thank you!

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1885s are great guns, depending on manufacturer.  Everyone has their opinions and favourites.  I like Sharps and Rolling Blocks myself.  The only things I would suggest as considerations are:

 

1) To absolutely lay hands on, and shoot a couple different rifles before you buy.  Most quality BPCR toys are not cheap by any means.  Make sure you get what feels and shoots best for you.

2) Most (not all...I know I know there are exceptions) but most long range SASS events back east peter out around 200 yards and a 38-55 is fine.  If you want to be able to go over to the NRA side of things, or even some of the long range SASS matches out west where things stretch a might farther, then 38-55 might be a little light.  I would suggest looking at 40-65 and up if you want to go out a ways and still knock targets down.

 

Coming to TN or KY any time soon?  I'll put you behind a Shiloh Sharps in 45-110 and see what you think ;)

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What the heck is this !!!! the hammer does not get in the way while wiping the bore ....  A .40-65 would be a TOP NOTCH choice in a Highwall ...

More knock-down power than the .38-55 and less bullet drop and wind-drift and lot less recoil than the .45-70 ...

I have two .38-55s and one .45-70 left and use my Highwall in .40-65 for 85% of my longrange shooting ....

 

Jabez Cowboy

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First, use a duplex load and forget bore wiping.

Second, if you are limited to 300 yards shooting paper, steel, and /or silhouettes, get a 32-40. Reputed to be able to stay with modern bolt actions in accuracy to 200 yards. Recognized as a super accurate from the 1880s.

"What the .32-40 lacks in velocity and energy it more than makes up for in accuracy. Many bench rest and Schuetzen records have been set with the .32-40. This has been accomplished using both black and smokeless powder, and combinations there-of behind cast bullets, breach seated, or fixed ammunition. In its heyday, some of the finest single shot target rifles of that era were chambered for the .32-40. There was also a popular wildcat target cartridge based on the .32-40 case, known as the .33-40. It is said that in a good rifle the .32-40 can hold its own with modern day match cartridges out to 300 yards."

http://www.chuckhawks.com/32-40WCF.htm

 

 

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1 hour ago, Red Cent said:

First, use a duplex load and forget bore wiping.

Second, if you are limited to 300 yards shooting paper, steel, and /or silhouettes, get a 32-40. Reputed to be able to stay with modern bolt actions in accuracy to 200 yards. Recognized as a super accurate from the 1880s.

"What the .32-40 lacks in velocity and energy it more than makes up for in accuracy. Many bench rest and Schuetzen records have been set with the .32-40. This has been accomplished using both black and smokeless powder, and combinations there-of behind cast bullets, breach seated, or fixed ammunition. In its heyday, some of the finest single shot target rifles of that era were chambered for the .32-40. There was also a popular wildcat target cartridge based on the .32-40 case, known as the .33-40. It is said that in a good rifle the .32-40 can hold its own with modern day match cartridges out to 300 yards."

http://www.chuckhawks.com/32-40WCF.htm

 

Forget duplex loads!!  This is not Schuetzen.  Read the rule book.  The rules clearly state that for “Buffalo Single Shot” does not allow any smokeless powder. “Any propellant powder may be used (with the exception smokeless powder is not allowed in the Buffalo Single Shot competition).”  You can however use black powder in the Single Shot category (ie any propellant powder)

If you’re going to shoot black powder then shoot the best “Swiss”.  Wiping is fast and easy.  I have several 1885 high walls and not one of them has a hammer that gets in the way.  While the smaller calibers (32-40 and 38-55) are accurate at modest ranges, they fall apart when the wind blows or the range is long (bend there and done that).  40-65 and 45-70 are just as accurate at shorter distances as the smaller calibers, but you can use the bigger calibers at long distances too.

 

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Further the .32-40 is not allowed in the buffalo Single shot class , whereas the .40-65 is legal and a Top notch choice for all SASS single shot longrange Classes ....

The .40 calibers have a very good blend of power to recoil .....

 

Jabez Cowboy

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I am a STRONG advocate for the 1885.  Lock time is much faster, no large heavy hammer swinging on one side of the action, etc. You can get an excellent rifle made here in the states.  I shoot a custom Meacham 1885 Silhouette in 45-70.  I think 45-70 is an excellent "starter" cartridge for new  BP cartridge shooters. Easy to load for and supplies are plentiful. For BPCR Silhouette 40-65 is extremely popular. For 1000yd. Bullseye 45-90 is very popular.  For most SASS long ranges of under 400yds. 38-55 is a dream to shoot.

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A shooter in my club shot a 38-55 H&R handi-rifle for years. He shot smokeless and kicked our butts out to 500 yards. And we have a lot of wind to deal with. He found the right bullet/load combination.

Most SASS rages are under 300 yards unless you head out west.

You can have a $3,000 rifle and still shoot like crap. The barrel, the load and the shooter need to be in sync.

Try some different rifles to make sure you like the fit to your arm length and shoulder. 

Ike

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When I got hooked on LR shooting, it was a Rolling Block in .45-70. That was what I wanted - set triggers? Etc. For Christmas that year, my honey got me a .38-55 (Uberti, I think)... plus several hundred cartridges from Black Hills or Ten-X. The thing about .38-55s is the bore diameter can vary A LOT! Long story short... the gun never would shoot and we got rid of it- it was not me, though many folks said it was... Dungannon, you've seen me shoot LR... anyhow, now I have a 1885 High Wall Browning Traditional Hunter in .45-70 and I love love love it!  Anyhow, if I were gonna get a .38-55 again, I'd buy a used one from someone I knew/trusted.  For the record, the guy who bought mine was told the story... he said he could get it to shoot and we told him we'd honor the 3 day buy back deal...  anyway, get something to shoot long range!  It's too much fun!!

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Up here in Western Canada you can find Cowboy shoots with target on the far side of 1,000 yards.

 

Just saying .

 

Jabez Cowboy

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We shoot at three gun clubs  locally at 100-200-300 yards. Three places to shoot long range each month. Yazzir. Small stuff too. Recently, they agreed to allow most any cartridge from the late 1800s. We can shoot duplex loads (smokeless class) and there is a scope class. They want to entertain and bring more shooters in. Those 300 yard turkeys are really small!

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