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UF-DAH!


Subdeacon Joe

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You'll never see a pirate do that.

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I have a friend who'd own one in a minute even if it never left his garage. He's a "professional 100% Swede".

 

100% Swede huh? My Norwegian Dad always told me that a "Swede" was a Norwegian with his brains knocked out. :lol:

 

I always thought Viking Boats were Norwegian built and all the movies have Vikings and Norwegian together as the guys who kicked A$$ and took names. Here is one they dug up in a burial mound in Norway. http://home.online.no/~joeolavl/viking/osebergskipet.htm

 

Jake

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Dem Norskies!

 

I recently read somewhere that the vikings did not wear horny hats.

That hollyweird came up with that. I still think they were a horny bunch.

 

 

Gotta throw out that tofu when it start to ferment, Charlie.

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Oh reminds of my childhood and the Nordic Fest in Decorah, Iowa and makes me hunger for .............lefse

 

 

 

 

What is dat ? !

 

 

Is dat like da fish soaked in lye an buried over dat winter an spring ?

 

 

 

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quote name='Apache Hawk 60642' timestamp='1348434649' post='2508643']

What is dat ? !

 

 

Is dat like da fish soaked in lye an buried over dat winter an spring ?

 

oh my no just very yummy stuff

 

Lefse is a traditional soft, Norwegian flatbread. Lefse is made out of potato, milk or cream (or sometimes lard) and flour, and cooked on a griddle. Special tools are available for lefse baking, including long wooden turning sticks and special rolling pins with deep grooves.

 

I am having a hard time getting a picture to load but wow good stuff! Was alwasy a part of the Thanksgiving dinner growing up.

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Now dat bread sounds down rat tasty !

 

Bet it goes good wif Basswood honey !

 

 

I just know it wood go good wif some ole Bulliet !

 

 

 

 

Bottles......a bottle of Bulliet an two glasses here..........

 

And fer Gawd's sake, wharsh dim glasses.......

 

Last cowpoke used dim as a spittoon !

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Now dat bread sounds down rat tasty !

 

Bet it goes good wif Basswood honey !

 

 

I just know it wood go good wif some ole Bulliet !

 

 

 

 

Bottles......a bottle of Bulliet an two glasses here..........

 

And fer Gawd's sake, wharsh dim glasses.......

 

Last cowpoke used dim as a spittoon !

 

Mom always served up with butter and sugar... it does not get much better than that! I will have to see if I can find someplace that will send it off to California!

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Check this out, Hawk.

 

 

Lutefisk History:

 

Lutefisk (pronounced LEWD-uh-fisk) is dried cod that has been soaked in a lye solution for several days to rehydrate it. It is then boiled or baked and served with butter, salt, and pepper. The finished lutefisk usually is the consistency of Jello. It is also called lyefish, and in the United States, Norwegian-Americans traditionally serve it for Thanksgiving and Christmas. In many Norwegian homes, lutefisk takes the place of the Christmas turkey. In Minnesota and Wisconsin, you can find lutefisk in local food stores and even at some restaurants. It is a food that you either love or hate, and, as some people say, "Once a year is probably enough!"

 

During the fall in Wisconsin, people watch their local newspapers for announcements of lutefisk suppers, which are usually held in Norwegian churches. usually every Norwegian church will host at least one lutefisk supper between October and the end of the year. The dinners have become so popular that lovers of the special dish drive great distances, and these are not just people of Scandinavian descent.

 

The history of lutefisk dates back to the Vikings. On one occasion, according to one legend, plundering Vikings burned down a fishing village, including the wooden racks with drying cod. the returning villagers poured water on the racks to put out the fire. Ashes covered the dried fish, and then it rained. the fish buried in the ashes in the ashes thus became soaked in a lye slush. Later the villagers were surprised to see that the dried fish had changed to what looked like fresh fish. they rinsed the fish in water and boiled it. the story is that one particularly brave villager tasted the fish and declared it "not bad."

 

Norwegian-Americans believe that lufefisk was brought by their ancestors on the ships when they came to America, and that it was all they had to eat. Today the fish is celebrated in ethnic and religious celebrations and is linked with hardship and courage.

 

 

 

 

Lutefisk Recipe

 

Family friend Neil Sticha of Bloomington, Minnesota, persuaded one of his favorite Norwegian cooks, Shirley LaBissonniers, to share her recipe for lutefisk.

 

First of all, invite brave people over for dinner who do not have misconceptions about this wonderful fish! Next, go to a store that carried the freshest of fish and seafood. Ideally, you would get the lutefisk that they pull out of a barrel (most stores hate those barrels a lot and don't do that anymore). Second best, it comes skinless and "trimmed" and packaged in a plastic.

 

Purchase the lutefisk a day before you want to serve it. Take it out of the plastic bag, put it in a large bowl, and cover with ice water. Change this water two to three times and keep in the refrigerator (if your family will let you). This firms up the fish.

 

Put the lutefisk in a glass baking dish and season with salt and pepper. Put in a preheated oven at 375 degrees F. for 25 to 30 minutes. The fish is done when it flakes easily with a fork. Do not overcook it or it will look like white Jello! It will be not brown.

 

In Minnesota, we allow at least a pound of lutefisk per person, served with hot melted butter. The two side dishes are riced potatoes and very small cooked frozen peas - no exceptions.

 

And, of course, you must have lefse. This is a ritual which we try to repeat as often as possible and as long as we can get the fresh lutefisk.

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Check this out, Hawk.

 

 

Lutefisk History:

 

Lutefisk (pronounced LEWD-uh-fisk) is dried cod that has been soaked in a lye solution for several days to rehydrate it. It is then boiled or baked and served with butter, salt, and pepper. The finished lutefisk usually is the consistency of Jello. It is also called lyefish, and in the United States, Norwegian-Americans traditionally serve it for Thanksgiving and Christmas. In many Norwegian homes, lutefisk takes the place of the Christmas turkey. In Minnesota and Wisconsin, you can find lutefisk in local food stores and even at some restaurants. It is a food that you either love or hate, and, as some people say, "Once a year is probably enough!"

 

During the fall in Wisconsin, people watch their local newspapers for announcements of lutefisk suppers, which are usually held in Norwegian churches. usually every Norwegian church will host at least one lutefisk supper between October and the end of the year. The dinners have become so popular that lovers of the special dish drive great distances, and these are not just people of Scandinavian descent.

 

The history of lutefisk dates back to the Vikings. On one occasion, according to one legend, plundering Vikings burned down a fishing village, including the wooden racks with drying cod. the returning villagers poured water on the racks to put out the fire. Ashes covered the dried fish, and then it rained. the fish buried in the ashes in the ashes thus became soaked in a lye slush. Later the villagers were surprised to see that the dried fish had changed to what looked like fresh fish. they rinsed the fish in water and boiled it. the story is that one particularly brave villager tasted the fish and declared it "not bad."

 

Norwegian-Americans believe that lufefisk was brought by their ancestors on the ships when they came to America, and that it was all they had to eat. Today the fish is celebrated in ethnic and religious celebrations and is linked with hardship and courage.

 

 

 

 

Lutefisk Recipe

 

Family friend Neil Sticha of Bloomington, Minnesota, persuaded one of his favorite Norwegian cooks, Shirley LaBissonniers, to share her recipe for lutefisk.

 

First of all, invite brave people over for dinner who do not have misconceptions about this wonderful fish! Next, go to a store that carried the freshest of fish and seafood. Ideally, you would get the lutefisk that they pull out of a barrel (most stores hate those barrels a lot and don't do that anymore). Second best, it comes skinless and "trimmed" and packaged in a plastic.

 

Purchase the lutefisk a day before you want to serve it. Take it out of the plastic bag, put it in a large bowl, and cover with ice water. Change this water two to three times and keep in the refrigerator (if your family will let you). This firms up the fish.

 

Put the lutefisk in a glass baking dish and season with salt and pepper. Put in a preheated oven at 375 degrees F. for 25 to 30 minutes. The fish is done when it flakes easily with a fork. Do not overcook it or it will look like white Jello! It will be not brown.

 

In Minnesota, we allow at least a pound of lutefisk per person, served with hot melted butter. The two side dishes are riced potatoes and very small cooked frozen peas - no exceptions.

 

And, of course, you must have lefse. This is a ritual which we try to repeat as often as possible and as long as we can get the fresh lutefisk.

 

 

I am not putting lutefisk in my lefse! :ph34r:

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Easy......

 

Der is a place in Winston - Salem NC dat sells a bread sim-a-lar to tater bread.............I tank it has some taters in it !

 

An it has buttry an brown sugar all over it too.

 

Lots of nooks an crannies fer dat butter an brown sugar to git inta !

 

Wif a good cup of coffee.......it can not be beat !

 

Dis place also makes Moravian Cookies.......paper thin an tastes too good !

 

PM me fer da name ifin' ya like.

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Check this out, Hawk.

 

 

Lutefisk History:

 

Lutefisk (pronounced LEWD-uh-fisk) is dried cod that has been soaked in a lye solution for several days to rehydrate it. It is then boiled or baked and served with butter, salt, and pepper. The finished lutefisk usually is the consistency of Jello. It is also called lyefish, and in the United States, Norwegian-Americans traditionally serve it for Thanksgiving and Christmas. In many Norwegian homes, lutefisk takes the place of the Christmas turkey. In Minnesota and Wisconsin, you can find lutefisk in local food stores and even at some restaurants. It is a food that you either love or hate, and, as some people say, "Once a year is probably enough!"

 

During the fall in Wisconsin, people watch their local newspapers for announcements of lutefisk suppers, which are usually held in Norwegian churches. usually every Norwegian church will host at least one lutefisk supper between October and the end of the year. The dinners have become so popular that lovers of the special dish drive great distances, and these are not just people of Scandinavian descent.

 

The history of lutefisk dates back to the Vikings. On one occasion, according to one legend, plundering Vikings burned down a fishing village, including the wooden racks with drying cod. the returning villagers poured water on the racks to put out the fire. Ashes covered the dried fish, and then it rained. the fish buried in the ashes in the ashes thus became soaked in a lye slush. Later the villagers were surprised to see that the dried fish had changed to what looked like fresh fish. they rinsed the fish in water and boiled it. the story is that one particularly brave villager tasted the fish and declared it "not bad."

 

Norwegian-Americans believe that lufefisk was brought by their ancestors on the ships when they came to America, and that it was all they had to eat. Today the fish is celebrated in ethnic and religious celebrations and is linked with hardship and courage.

 

 

 

 

Lutefisk Recipe

 

Family friend Neil Sticha of Bloomington, Minnesota, persuaded one of his favorite Norwegian cooks, Shirley LaBissonniers, to share her recipe for lutefisk.

 

First of all, invite brave people over for dinner who do not have misconceptions about this wonderful fish! Next, go to a store that carried the freshest of fish and seafood. Ideally, you would get the lutefisk that they pull out of a barrel (most stores hate those barrels a lot and don't do that anymore). Second best, it comes skinless and "trimmed" and packaged in a plastic.

 

Purchase the lutefisk a day before you want to serve it. Take it out of the plastic bag, put it in a large bowl, and cover with ice water. Change this water two to three times and keep in the refrigerator (if your family will let you). This firms up the fish.

 

Put the lutefisk in a glass baking dish and season with salt and pepper. Put in a preheated oven at 375 degrees F. for 25 to 30 minutes. The fish is done when it flakes easily with a fork. Do not overcook it or it will look like white Jello! It will be not brown.

 

In Minnesota, we allow at least a pound of lutefisk per person, served with hot melted butter. The two side dishes are riced potatoes and very small cooked frozen peas - no exceptions.

 

And, of course, you must have lefse. This is a ritual which we try to repeat as often as possible and as long as we can get the fresh lutefisk.

 

Badger, I heard from da MEN dat eat it, dat dey love da butter da besets ! LOL

 

 

Now, I aint puttin no white jello like lye cooked flish inta dis gut.....ya hear me !

 

What wood all dos other cowboys say bout me ? ?

 

I do got my reputation ta up hold, ya know ! ! LOL

 

 

 

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Badger, I heard from da MEN dat eat it, dat dey love da butter da besets ! LOL

 

 

Now, I aint puttin no white jello like lye cooked flish inta dis gut.....ya hear me !

 

What wood all dos other cowboys say bout me ? ?

 

I do got my reputation ta up hold, ya know ! ! LOL

 

I think you are gonna need some help on that issue, Hawk.

I would help out, but mine is shot also. :lol: :lol:

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Badger, I heard from da MEN dat eat it, dat dey love da butter da besets ! LOL

 

 

Now, I aint puttin no white jello like lye cooked flish inta dis gut.....ya hear me !

 

What wood all dos other cowboys say bout me ? ?

 

I do got my reputation ta up hold, ya know ! ! LOL

 

 

If you are going to put that stuff on it you might as well put tofu on it

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I think you are gonna need some help on that issue, Hawk.

I would help out, but mine is shot also. :lol: :lol:

 

 

He He He..............

 

 

Badger....betwix da both of our reputations, yur story holds bout a much water as a wooden bucket wif no bottom !

 

 

 

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100% Swede huh? My Norwegian Dad always told me that a "Swede" was a Norwegian with his brains knocked out. :lol:

 

I always thought Viking Boats were Norwegian built and all the movies have Vikings and Norwegian together as the guys who kicked A$$ and took names. Here is one they dug up in a burial mound in Norway. http://home.online.no/~joeolavl/viking/osebergskipet.htm

 

Jake

And Grandma Corneliussen use to say "A Thousand Swedes Ran Through the Weeds, Chased By a Single Norwegian~" ^_^

 

Let's see.... she checked out at 102 years of age, as I recall. :rolleyes:

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