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Noz

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Are you aware that congress passed and BO signed a bill that makes it again legal to slaughter horses?

 

Next a Big Pony Burger?

Maybe a Palomino Whopper?

 

Me? I have no great love for horses so it doesn't bother me a bit.

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There is a serious problem with abandoned horses these days as the economy prevents people from caring and feeding their animals. Most horse rescue shelters in Colorado have been full up for a long time. Sad situation.

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Are you aware that congress passed and BO signed a bill that makes it again legal to slaughter horses?

 

Next a Big Pony Burger?

Maybe a Palomino Whopper?

 

Me? I have no great love for horses so it doesn't bother me a bit.

 

 

Made 100% of my living with horses one way of the other for most my life.

Still do for the most part. (just started a new biz)

 

See this as a good thing.

 

Most the meat goes overseas. Sells for big money. High dollar meat over there.

 

They ARE a livestock animal.

 

Now I love horses. But there is a place for this.

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I am a horse owner and currently two of my horses are wild mustangs rescued by the BLM. You may not be aware that horse meat is rarely consumed in the United States. Most of it is shipped to Europe to countries like France. I see this law as a step to reducing the overpopulaton of unwanted horses.

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Are you aware that congress passed and BO signed a bill that makes it again legal to slaughter horses?

 

Next a Big Pony Burger?

Maybe a Palomino Whopper?

 

Me? I have no great love for horses so it doesn't bother me a bit.

 

I've got 12 hay burners as we speak. I'm also a believer that equine slaughter is part and parcel of the horse business. There has to be an economically rational way to remove surplus population.

 

There's no problem that I see with folks who want to try cheval or pferde. The Fluffbunnies of the world tend not to see it that way.

 

SQQ

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The ban on horse slaughter created many problems. Most of the people in favor of it never sat a horse, mucked out a stable, or cleaned a hoof. They did watch a lot of Disney movies though. <_<

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When the ban was running, I've helped a local rancher cull a couple. All we could do was dig a hole in the ground and push the dead animal in it. This is actually one bill that I support. The question now is, what did they add on to it?

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The horse slaughter ban was as ill advised as prohibition, creating major problems for everyone involved with the possible exception of the "disney movie" types referenced by Utah Bob. What most of those types don't realize is that horses were still going to slaughter, but not in the US, so they were being shipped to Mexico and Canada creating even more "trauma" than what they were trying to prevent! Not to mention the lack of regulation and oversight that would exsist at a Mexican slaughter house.

 

There was a guy on ABC Radio news yesterday saying that "9 out of 10 horses that go to slaughter are young healthy horses." Obviously ABC wants to push the ban back and doesn't give a shot whether they report facts. SHAME.

 

Let your Congressman know that we as horsemen support the lifting of this foolish legislation, and the appropriation of funds for oversight of same.

(I also applaud the "quiet" approach they took and the President for signing it!)

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Are you aware that congress passed and BO signed a bill that makes it again legal to slaughter horses?

Next a Big Pony Burger?

Maybe a Palomino Whopper?

Me? I have no great love for horses so it doesn't bother me a bit.

 

YES . . and a good thing it is too.

 

The animal lovers ban on slaughtering horses led to the abandonment and starvation of many horses.

 

If the animal lovers want to stop the slaughter of animals let them lobby for the end to the slaugher of cows and pigs and chickens and turkeys . . . :blink:

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There was a guy on ABC Radio news yesterday saying that "9 out of 10 horses that go to slaughter are young healthy horses." Obviously ABC wants to push the ban back and doesn't give a shot whether they report facts. SHAME.

Just assuming, for the sake of argument that were true...

 

A. Doesn't it make more sense to use meat from healthy stock? Can't

butcher a sick cow, for example.

 

2. Would he prefer them to die of disease and starvation?

 

If the animal lovers want to stop the slaughter of animals let them lobby for the end to the slaugher of cows and pigs and chickens and turkeys . . . :blink:

Dude, where ya been? Many want to do exactly that.

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Just assuming, for the sake of argument that were true...

 

A. Doesn't it make more sense to use meat from healthy stock? Can't

butcher a sick cow, for example.

 

True, I guess since the majority I've seen go to the canner were either old and infirmed or three legged lame I just lumped that into Unhealthy.

Un-usable would be a better description I suppose. No one made that point on the radio.

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Just assuming, for the sake of argument that were true...

 

A. Doesn't it make more sense to use meat from healthy stock? Can't

butcher a sick cow, for example.

True, I guess since the majority I've seen go to the canner were either old and infirmed or three legged lame I just lumped that into Unhealthy.

Un-usable would be a better description I suppose. No one made that point on the radio.

My point was that I question the accuracy of his assertion, but even if true there are valid reasons. Apparently he thinks it better for them to freeze to death, starve, die from injuries...

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Animals slaughtered for human consumption and export or interstate sale will be Federally inspected. Federal inspectors and their Veterinarian supervisors are trained to identify those conditions in an animal that would pose a food safety risk to consumers. For example, an animal may have a chronic condition that is localized to an internal organ but which will not affect the meat at all. A touch of pneumonia for example. On the other hand, one of those beautiful fat feedlot steers that looks great on the outside might have a problem that cause it to be condemned, like a bit of cancer on its eye that has already spread to a neighboring lymph node.

 

My point is, you can't really tell if it's good enough to eat or not just by looking at the outside, most of the time.

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The ban on horse slaughter created many problems. Most of the people in favor of it never sat a horse, mucked out a stable, or cleaned a hoof. They did watch a lot of Disney movies though. <_<

 

You are so right UB.

 

I've seen way too many starved & neglected horses the last several years and it's a sad, sad sight. At least with a market for their meat death comes quickly for them.

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Guest Tennessee Stud, SASS# 43634 Life

From the movie... Culpepper Cattle Company.... (Paraphrased... of course)...

 

 

Young boy (Gary Grimes) talkin' to cowboy: "What's your horse's name?"

 

Cowboy back to young boy: "Why would I want to name something that I may have to eat?"

 

 

 

ts

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Frankly, I am surprised at the mature realistic posts above. I really thought there would be some knee-jerk responses of the Walt Disney types.

 

Good for you!

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Have known and been friends with many buyers in the past. (we just called them killer buyers around here)

 

Back then. They would go to all the horse sales and buy up horses to take to the plants.

 

Can tell you. They would NOT, buy one that was sick or to broke down. The plant would not take them, and then

they would be stuck with them. Could not stay in biz long if they did that much.

And you would never see them buy a white horse. Would also see them check under tails for signs of cancer on some.

 

Most that was at it long. Could tell you the weight of a horse VERY VERY close, just by looking at it.

 

 

Remember when I was buying and tradeing alot. I would call one buyer and ask what the price per pound was at that time. As some I would buy, knowing I could make money even if I just had to wiegh it up.

Could buy it. Take it home and try them out to see if I could sell at a rider. If did not work out. He would swing by and

buy them on weight.

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Frankly, I am surprised at the mature realistic posts above. I really thought there would be some knee-jerk responses of the Walt Disney types.

 

Good for you!

 

Post it over on the mounted board.

I double dog dare ya. ;)

 

 

Actually I suspect the responses would be much the same. Responsible horse owners know the score.

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And you would never see them buy a white horse.

Whyzat?

 

Frankly, I am surprised at the mature realistic posts above. I really thought there would be some knee-jerk responses of the Walt Disney types.

 

Good for you!

I am a hardcore animal lover (as I bet many here are) and hate to see any animal mistreated or put down for any reason. However, anyone who doesn't realize this is necessary, and better for the animals in the long run, has likely been educated beyond the limits of his capacity.

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I wonder, will this be the end of horses or will the trend be to raise them for meat production, like beef and pork. I have 3 mules and 1 horse and cost about 4 times the amount to feed and take of them than it did 5 or 6 years ago. Economy has driven the ownership of fine animals to be a thing of the past. What happens when all the backyard horses are sent to slaughter? Will the demand for horse meat cause the price to go up and will the equine be raised for profit on large ranches?

Just thinking.

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I wonder, will this be the end of horses or will the trend be to raise them for meat production, like beef and pork. I have 3 mules and 1 horse and cost about 4 times the amount to feed and take of them than it did 5 or 6 years ago. Economy has driven the ownership of fine animals to be a thing of the past. What happens when all the backyard horses are sent to slaughter? Will the demand for horse meat cause the price to go up and will the equine be raised for profit on large ranches?

Just thinking.

 

Nope.

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I wonder, will this be the end of horses or will the trend be to raise them for meat production, like beef and pork. I have 3 mules and 1 horse and cost about 4 times the amount to feed and take of them than it did 5 or 6 years ago. Economy has driven the ownership of fine animals to be a thing of the past. What happens when all the backyard horses are sent to slaughter? Will the demand for horse meat cause the price to go up and will the equine be raised for profit on large ranches?

Just thinking.

 

There really is little or no market for horse meat in the U.S. I understand that there are some high end places in Canada where horsemeat is served but I doubt its a very big business. Most human consumption is overseas in Europe and Asia.

 

Horses, relative to other domestic meat animals (cows, pigs, chickens, goats, etc.) are poor converters of feed and don't return a good investment on dollars in. There are some breeds in Europe that are raised for meat and may have had enough selection in their breeding that they are more efficient than the typical U.S. saddle or draft horse.

 

Before the demise of the U.S. processors what demand for horse meat there was (for human or other consumption) was served by the normal surplus in the industry. Horses that were aging, lame (due to injury), defective (genetic problems such as blindness or conformational defects), etc. were sufficient to satisfy the market. Now it's considered declasse' to sell off such stock. The "new standard" is to spend lots of money to keep these animals "happy" and alive. If somebody wants to spend their money for that then God Bless 'Em. But a dollar spent on a horse with no future as a useful animal is a dollar not available to bring along a good colt or filly.

 

The equine industry is on its butt for a lot of reasons but the Big One is that the engine that has driven it for decades, the Baby Boomers, are getting old and are dropping out big time. The recent recession has aggravated this long term trend. The Boomers' kids, by and large, are more interested in other things than horses. Thier kids even less than their parents. At the elite levels of any equine sport you'll still find some Real Money, but at the amatuer and "pleasure rider" level the trends are all pretty bad.

 

SQQ

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I wonder, will this be the end of horses or will the trend be to raise them for meat production, like beef and pork.

 

 

Never did before. Why would it be any different now.

 

Right now you got horses at sales that will not even get a $50 bid.

That would have brought $750 just by weight before.

Gives a place for those to go.

 

Back just a few years ago when the processors was in production, and had been for years.

There was still more than enough horses around. So no need to worry about all the back yard horses

going away.

And horses are still harder, and cost more to raise that cattle or sheep. So don't think anybody is going

to be breeding them just for meat production. If they do. They are not very smart. When you can raise cattle

faster and cheaper.

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I wonder, will this be the end of horses or will the trend be to raise them for meat production, like beef and pork. I have 3 mules and 1 horse and cost about 4 times the amount to feed and take of them than it did 5 or 6 years ago. Economy has driven the ownership of fine animals to be a thing of the past. What happens when all the backyard horses are sent to slaughter? Will the demand for horse meat cause the price to go up and will the equine be raised for profit on large ranches?

Just thinking.

 

Not a chance. First of all there will always be a need for good quality horses, whether for ranch work, rodeo, pleasure.

 

Second I would guess there are more horses owned today than at any time before the automobile was invented. Many of my neighbors own a couple of hay eaters and it is not uncommon to drive for miles and see horses at every rural residence.

 

I hope that the slaughter helps to drive prices and demand back up.

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Not a chance. First of all there will always be a need for good quality horses, whether for ranch work, rodeo, pleasure.

 

Second I would guess there are more horses owned today than at any time before the automobile was invented. Many of my neighbors own a couple of hay eaters and it is not uncommon to drive for miles and see horses at every rural residence.

 

I hope that the slaughter helps to drive prices and demand back up.

Maybe. Right now I'm thinking the price of feed, $25 a bale here, will prevent any demand for the pleasure horse. I know that I had to give a way my best horse to control the feed bill and I'm trying to find homes for a couple of mules. Also, selling the nice 3 horse g/n and going to an old 2 horse b/p.

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Not a chance. First of all there will always be a need for good quality horses, whether for ranch work, rodeo, pleasure.

 

Second I would guess there are more horses owned today than at any time before the automobile was invented. Many of my neighbors own a couple of hay eaters and it is not uncommon to drive for miles and see horses at every rural residence.

 

I hope that the slaughter helps to drive prices and demand back up.

 

Lots of horses are owned; few are used. The path seems to be to keep them until they die but don't replace them. Unused horses don't need tack; tack shops are failing left, right, and center. Unused horses don't need training and don't have riders who don't need instructors. This scenario goes down the line even in TN (and TN has the third or fourth largest equine population in the Union).

 

Even if the plants re-opened tomorrow it would do little to raise the overall value because even at their peek they set a floor, the value of the carcass. I tried to find a historical record for the price of equine carcasses but came up "dry." IIRC prices ran from about 25 cents/lb. to 75 cent/lb., depending upon season, quality of the carcass, etc. That set a base value of $250 to $750 for an average horse. That's a whole lot better than $50 asking and no takers, but nobody is going to make money at that level (given that in a low cost area it will take about $3000 to bring a horse to market weight).

 

Again, the plants were the "safety valve" that removed surplus animals from the industry. We've "tied down" that valave and now are seeing some very unpleasant consequences in terms of equine neglect and cruelty; abandonment; failing rescues; etc.

 

SQQ

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Sure, I'm appalled!

 

But the price of a 50# bale around here is $10. We are still scrambling to keep our 5 PROPERLY fed through this winter. The pastures are overgrazed due to the drought, and as I drive around I see a lot of malnourished animals. The Equine Rescue places are allbulging at the seams with abandoned horses. I can't help them by fostering without shorting our own animals, and they are my first responsibility.

 

There is only so much graze out there. I would rather see some horses culled than a malnourished, runty herd. This is also one of the justifications for hunting Bambi.....

 

Buema suerte,

eGG

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Back in my SeaBee days I had a chance to travel most of the world....during that time I would try to spend my time out in town in any particular country seeing how other peoples lived....so I have ate many different things dog, monkey meat on a stick, whale and yes horse.

 

Some of the strange stuff went from down right tasty to I think I want to puke....

 

As for the horse meat....I have known a few horses that I would rather eat then try to ride.

 

Pastissada

 

traditional Italian recipe from the Verona area.

 

2 pounds horse meat

2 ounces lard or porkback fat

2-3 carrots, cut into slivers

2 sticks celery, diced

1 large onion, diced

4 cloves

a dozen coriander seeds

1 bay leaf

1 clove garlic

1 bottle Italian red wine

flour, enough to brown the meat with

1/4 cup olive oil

salt & pepper to taste

1 Tbsp. butter kneaded into enough flour to make a small ball

paprika to taste

 

Slather the meat with the lard and slivers of carrots. Dice the other vegetables and put them, with the meat and spices (except the paprika) in a bowl. Pour the wine over everything, then cover and marinate in the refrigerator for three days, turning the meat occasionally.

 

Pat the meat dry with paper towel (keep the vegetables and the marinade), flour it, and brown it in the oil over a brisk flame. Add the vegetables. When they've cooked for a few minutes, pour the marinade over the meat. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for about three hours. Once the meat is done, remove it to a platter saving the sauce that has been formed with the marinade.

 

Return the sauce to the fire, thicken it with the butter-flour ball, and season it to taste with paprika. Pour the sauce over the meat, and serve with a good traditional side dish.

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Sure, I'm appalled!

 

But the price of a 50# bale around here is $10. We are still scrambling to keep our 5 PROPERLY fed through this winter. The pastures are overgrazed due to the drought, and as I drive around I see a lot of malnourished animals. The Equine Rescue places are allbulging at the seams with abandoned horses. I can't help them by fostering without shorting our own animals, and they are my first responsibility.

 

There is only so much graze out there. I would rather see some horses culled than a malnourished, runty herd. This is also one of the justifications for hunting Bambi.....

 

Buema suerte,

eGG

 

When feeding out livestock for meat horse is at the bottom of the list for turning feed to meat....horses are relatively poor converters of grass and grain to meat compared to cattle or sheep

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Its not bad if cooked right

 

 

Wookie Tenderloin with Blackberry Sauce

 

• 1 lb. Wookie tenderloin

• 1/2 tsp. ground thyme

• 1/4 tsp. ground nutmeg

• 1 tsp. black pepper

• 1/2 tsp sugar

• 1 cup hickory chips

• 5 lb. of charcoal

• Blackberry Sauce

• parsley sprigs

• artichoke hearts

• yellow squash slices

 

Mix thyme, nutmeg, pepper and soy sauce, and marinate Wookie tenderloin overnight in the refrigerator. Soak 1 cup of hickory chips in a bucket of water overnight.

 

Build a fire in a covered barbecue grill using 5 lbs of charcoal. Allow the coals to burn for 30 minutes.

 

If using a gas grill, preheat for 30 minutes. Scatter the soaked chips over the coals and close the lid for 10 minutes.

 

Place the Wookie tenderloin on the grill and baste with the marinade, Close the lid and cook for 5 minutes.

 

Turn the Wookie tenderloin and baste again. Close the lid and cook for another 5 minutes.

 

Wookie meat should be rare because Wookie has no fat and toughens quickly.

 

Serve on a platter with Blackberry Sauce. Garnish with parsley sprigs, artichoke hearts and yellow squash slices. Serves 2 to 4.

 

Back in my SeaBee days I had a chance to travel most of the world....during that time I would try to spend my time out in town in any particular country seeing how other peoples lived....so I have ate many different things dog, monkey meat on a stick, whale and yes horse.

 

Some of the strange stuff went from down right tasty to I think I want to puke....

 

As for the horse meat....I have known a few horses that I would rather eat then try to ride.

 

Pastissada

 

traditional Italian recipe from the Verona area.

 

2 pounds horse meat

2 ounces lard or porkback fat

2-3 carrots, cut into slivers

2 sticks celery, diced

1 large onion, diced

4 cloves

a dozen coriander seeds

1 bay leaf

1 clove garlic

1 bottle Italian red wine

flour, enough to brown the meat with

1/4 cup olive oil

salt & pepper to taste

1 Tbsp. butter kneaded into enough flour to make a small ball

paprika to taste

 

Slather the meat with the lard and slivers of carrots. Dice the other vegetables and put them, with the meat and spices (except the paprika) in a bowl. Pour the wine over everything, then cover and marinate in the refrigerator for three days, turning the meat occasionally.

 

Pat the meat dry with paper towel (keep the vegetables and the marinade), flour it, and brown it in the oil over a brisk flame. Add the vegetables. When they've cooked for a few minutes, pour the marinade over the meat. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for about three hours. Once the meat is done, remove it to a platter saving the sauce that has been formed with the marinade.

 

Return the sauce to the fire, thicken it with the butter-flour ball, and season it to taste with paprika. Pour the sauce over the meat, and serve with a good traditional side dish.

You certainly have a peculiar diet.

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You certainly have a peculiar diet.

 

 

What can I say in this economy you have to think of the basics ...food , shelter , clothing , powder & lead....Tonight I am fixing the wife a nice shrimp & spaghetti squash enchilada using a Chipotle cream sauce ....not everything I cook is weird

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Guest Tennessee Stud, SASS# 43634 Life

I've been hungry before... and many miles from readily-available food. Until a fella kilt an elk... and we ate the backstrips... I was wastin' away... literally. At the time... and unbeknownst to me... gluten intolerance had set in on me. Ever Mountain House meal I ate... I got sicker than 40 dogs on it.

 

At the time... I coulda ate somebody else's horse... but not mine. The thought of wishin' somebody's horse pullin' up lame even crossed my mind... extreme hunger can lead to irresistible impulses.

 

If a zombie-apocalypse-like event was to ever occur in this great country of ourn... city-folk will pour out into the countryside... and not be easily-resistant to fences, signs or even the shouted-deterrent. In their minds... 'specially for them kids of theirs... they WILL have no choice: They will take or die.

 

Sounds strange don't it... but I been there... I have understood hunger.

 

ts

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Made 100% of my living with horses one way of the other for most my life.

Still do for the most part. (just started a new biz)

 

See this as a good thing.

 

Most the meat goes overseas. Sells for big money. High dollar meat over there.

 

They ARE a livestock animal.

 

Now I love horses. But there is a place for this.

 

+1 on the liveyhood.

 

 

 

I have eatten horse and I like it and don't see what all the fuss is about !

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