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Armed School Resource Officers


T. H. O' Sullivan

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My youngest son is in the 8th grade here in New Mexico. His school has a police officer there every day. This is the case in New Mexico with such School Resource Officers placed in schools beginning with the 6th grade. When the word of this Friday shooting reached New Mexico, the schools were placed on lock-down and additional officers sent to schools. In the case of my son's middle school, a second armed officer was added.

 

At this point, instead of arming teachers or principals, why not place an armed officer in every school, beginning with elemetary school. This person could even be a retired officer, but armed. For this I would consider higher Municipal, State or even Federal Taxes. On a nationwide level the tax would be very small when spread amongst all taxpayers.

 

Just a thought...

 

T.H. O'Sullivan

Black Mesa Ranch

New Mexico

:FlagAm:/>

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...even a better idea, just have each school district levy there own local tax hike to cover the additional armed staff... ...no problem here...

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It works in many areas. The cost is not exhorbitant and could be covred wit Federal grants. A much more sensible use of money than a lot of programs. I see no downside although I know some here disagree. It makes more sense than arming the teachers. We have to remember that even if we revamp the mental health care system and even if we ban guns completely, there will always be the chance that a lunatic or enraged idiot will attempt something horrific. Children need to be protected to the best of our ability as a society.

I'm even willing to pay more taxes to ensure that.

 

Did I say that out loud?

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I don't know how it's done in other States, but here in New Mexico we have no SROs at the Elementary School level. Perhaps that needs to change now.

Yes. It's been the norm in many areas to put them in high schools. But I think all public schools shouldbe covered.

And right now.

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That would be a first step, but ideally I can see every teacher and administrator, including playground supervisors (We used to call them "teachers" and it was part of each teacher's duty to manage the playground in rotation) being TRAINED, ARMED, and AUTHORIZED to use deadly force to protect the kids. If any of those people protest or refuse this responsibility, reassign them to the board offices or suggest they find employment elsewhere.

 

We have armed people everywhere from government buildings to banks to factories and power plants to used car lots and shopping centers. Why not to protect "our nation's most valuable resource"?

 

Now, before everyone starts jumping on me saying I don't know what I'm talking about let me tell you, I have almost 12 years as a teacher in public and private schools, three plus years as an unarmed (Yeah, right!) Campus Proctor, and come from a family of teachers including both parents, my only sibling, about a dozen cousins, two aunts, and one uncle. I grew up in a family where about half of the guests in our home were teachers or school administrators.

 

Over the years I have hunted deer, elk, ducks and geese, upland game, cougar and bobcat, and the wily trout with my dad and a Superintendent of the local school district, a few Principals, any number of teachers and college professors, two high school ROTC instructors, coaches and athletic directors, and more than a few support staff people such as a librarian, a cafeteria manager, two janitors, and at least one district carpenter. More than one carried a gun on their person or had on nearby at all times. These ranged from a Baby Browning (plated and engraved...a guns to die for) to a Luger, a couple of .38 revolvers, one Beretta M0del 35 or 35, and a single action army.

 

I can't even begin to imagine anyone shooting up our local campuses without being confronted by an armed person.

 

As late as 1989 when I was Director of Academics for a private business college in a totally crappy part of Pomona, I was armed every minute I was on the campus. So were at least six or seven other staff members that I was aware of.

 

So, yeah, I DO know what I'm talking about and it will require a change of mindset in the communities and among"educationists", time, money, and conviction, but I see it as the only viable option.

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Yes. It's been the norm in many areas to put them in high schools. But I think all public schools shouldbe covered.

And right now.

Another benefit of placing SROs in schools, beginning at the Elementary level, is the exposure the local PD would get with the youngsters. Gone are the days of the "beat cop", that friendly officer you knew personally by name, and he knew you. The officer with their specific training could influence the little minds with a positive view of law enforcement. I don't see the SRO as strictly a security guard, but an important addition to the elementary school experience.

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That would be a first step, but ideally I can see every teacher and administrator, including playground supervisors (We used to call them "teachers" and it was part of each teacher's duty to manage the playground in rotation) being TRAINED, ARMED, and AUTHORIZED to use deadly force to protect the kids. If any of those people protest or refuse this responsibility, reassign them to the board offices or suggest they find employment elsewhere.

 

We have armed people everywhere from government buildings to banks to factories and power plants to used car lots and shopping centers. Why not to protect "our nation's most valuable resource"?

 

Now, before everyone starts jumping on me saying I don't know what I'm talking about let me tell you, I have almost 12 years as a teacher in public and private schools, three plus years as an unarmed (Yeah, right!) Campus Proctor, and come from a family of teachers including both parents, my only sibling, about a dozen cousins, two aunts, and one uncle. I grew up in a family where about half of the guests in our home were teachers or school administrators.

 

Over the years I have hunted deer, elk, ducks and geese, upland game, cougar and bobcat, and the wily trout with my dad and a Superintendent of the local school district, a few Principals, any number of teachers and college professors, two high school ROTC instructors, coaches and athletic directors, and more than a few support staff people such as a librarian, a cafeteria manager, two janitors, and at least one district carpenter. More than one carried a gun on their person or had on nearby at all times. These ranged from a Baby Browning (plated and engraved...a guns to die for) to a Luger, a couple of .38 revolvers, one Beretta M0del 35 or 35, and a single action army.

 

I can't even begin to imagine anyone shooting up our local campuses without being confronted by an armed person.

 

As late as 1989 when I was Director of Academics for a private business college in a totally crappy part of Pomona, I was armed every minute I was on the campus. So were at least six or seven other staff members that I was aware of.

 

So, yeah, I DO know what I'm talking about and it will require a change of mindset in the communities and among"educationists", time, money, and conviction, but I see it as the only viable option.

But it has to be a universal program and I think if you told the vast majority of teachers that one of their responsibilities would be armed protection, especially in liberal urban areas, they would probably just leave the profession in droves. And it's hard enough to get good teachers now.

It would work here in rural Colorado but not in Boulder or Austin.

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Another benefit of placing SROs in schools, beginning at the Elementary level, is the exposure the local PD would get with the youngsters. Gone are the days of the "beat cop", that friendly officer you knew personally by name, and he knew you. The officer with their specific training could influence the little minds with a positive view of law enforcement. I don't see the SRO as strictly a security guard, but an important addition to the elementary school experience.

And maybe a positive roll model?

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But it has to be a universal program and I think if you told the vast majority of teachers that one of their responsibilities would be armed protection, especially in liberal urban areas, they would probably just leave the profession in droves. And it's hard enough to get good teachers now.

It would work here in rural Colorado but not in Boulder or Austin.

 

But do you want people who refuse to be responsible for the children to continue being responsible for teaching them anything of value?

 

I neve said it was going to be easy, but I think it is rapidly becoming necessary. Implement it in increments, the same way the liberals have taken everything away from us...one tiny step at a time.

 

"Do it for the children" is their mantra: let's make it ours.

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"Yes, I'd pay higher taxes for...."

Some liberal is having an orgasm.

Be careful what you wish for. We'll end up with an Office of Safe Schools whose agenda is not entirely about safe schools. Head of the office might even publicly state admiration for a well known pedophile and publicy stated said of the religious right "F--- 'em!". Wait......we already have that. Now watch it grow.

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TSA Airport Division

 

TSA High School Division

 

TSA Grade School Division

 

TSA Kindergarten Division

 

 

 

I don't think so. How about putting back in the curriculum morals and religion?

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Hardening SCHOOLS is a "must do", however it is not the ONLY place that needs to "Harden Up". Any place where people congregate should allow CHL holders to walk around carrying, or hire an armed (and trained) guard for every 3000 square feet of real estate. Malls, Stadiums, Race Tracks etc. Any soft target location that draws large crowds MUST harden up.

 

The liberals with whom I work, based in New York City, L.A, and D.C., all say the same thing. "More guns is not the answer". (They point to the recent shootings at the Empire State Building where the majority wounded were hit by NYPD rounds.) Those Liberals need to be SHOWN that more guns, in responsible hands, IS an answer. But, alas, there will always 47% who see things as RED and another 47% that see the same thing as BLUE. And it is very hard to change a mind on either side. We want more armed deterrants to mass murders. They want to put a flower in our barrels.

 

Until the populace of this country decide to open their minds to other points of view, have a rational conversation, and come up with some WORKABLE SOLUTIONS, we are just spinning our wheels.

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TSA Airport Division

 

TSA High School Division

 

TSA Grade School Division

 

TSA Kindergarten Division

 

I don't think so. How about putting back in the curriculum morals and religion?

No Federal involvement. Wouldn't trust them in the schools anyway. This has to be locally run.

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If any of those people protest or refuse this responsibility, reassign them to the board offices or suggest they find employment elsewhere. We have armed people everywhere from government buildings to banks to factories and power plants to used car lots and shopping centers. Why not to protect "our nation's most valuable resource"?

 

Enrollment

In 2010–11, there were about 13,600 public school districts (source) made up of over 98,800 public schools, including about 5,300 charter schools (source). In 2009–10, there were about 33,400 private schools offering kindergarten or higher grades (source).

In fall 2012, over 49.8 million students will attend public elementary and secondary schools. Of these, 35.1 million will be in prekindergarten through 8th grade and 14.8 million will be in grades 9 through 12 (source). An additional 5.3 million students are expected to attend private schools.

 

About 1.3 million children are expected to attend public prekindergarten this fall. Enrollment in kindergarten is projected to reach approximately 3.7 million students.

 

Teachers

 

Public school systems will employ about 3.3 million full-time-equivalent (FTE) teachers this fall, such that the number of pupils per FTE teacher—that is, the pupil/teacher ratio—will be 15.2. This ratio is lower than the 2000 ratio of 16.0. A projected 0.4 million FTE teachers will be working in private schools this fall, resulting in an estimated pupil/teacher ratio of 12.3, which is also lower than the 2000 ratio of 14.5

School Stats

 

I am for protecting our children (yes, I have 3 and am married to a teacher), but the numbers don't support enhanced gun control or arming teachers. Almost 50 million kids attend school each year, and 3.3 million teachers will teach them. Yes, this is an absolutely horrific situation and the loss of even one child to this type of violence is one too many, but more guns or less guns is NOT the answer. I submit that more kids are lost to suicide than mass shootings, why isn't there more focus on that? This is a very high profile and tragic situation and stats don't comfort these grieving families, but there have been approx. 44 school shootings since 1996. There are over 100,000 public schools that meet each day. The odds of losing your life in a school shooting are less than getting hit by lightning. I agree this is horrible, but forcing our educators to carry a gun or find another job isn't the best answer to school shootings. Hiring a guard with a metal detector, maybe.

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