Jump to content
SASS Wire Forum

Hurricane Irene


Aunt Jen

Recommended Posts

On this one http://www.weather.com/weather/hurricanecentral/article/tropical-depression-nine-storm-hurricane-irene_2011-08-20 the forecast winds are available, and while it looks like it will be quite a storm, the winds look forecast to decrease from 115 down to 45 over the course of it's possible trip up the coast, with the windiest side being out to sea during that time. Moving north, spinning counter-clockwise, the winds will be slower on that left side.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here are a couple of places to track Hurricane Irene:

 

The Weather Channel: http://www.weather.com/weather/hurricanecentral/article/tropical-depression-nine-storm-hurricane-irene_2011-08-20

 

The National Hurricane Center: http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/

 

I hope everyone in its path has taken appropriate precautions for safety.

 

Also:

Weather Underground

Intellicast

We used these along with the others when I worked the LE Command Center in Miami during Katrina and several other nasty ones.

If you're in the path, leave. Hurricanes are serious things. No time to party like some idiots do. Lock up and hit the road. If you are in a coastal area without strong hurricane building codes (like most of the NE) you will serve no purpose by staying in your house. You won't be able to save it. You'll just die. Board up. Get out and go inland. Do it soon.

I'm hoping this thing loses it's punch as it hits cooler water and land mass.

 

Hurricanes are like earthquakes. If you've never been through one it's hard to understand and appreciate their power and your helplessness.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Also:

 

Hurricanes are like earthquakes. If you've never been through one it's hard to understand and appreciate their power and your helplessness.

 

 

Hey Bob.... did a tornado earlier this spring, :o earthquake earlier this week :( and Irene due Sat morn..... oh yeah... we had the ' snow storm of the century' back in January :huh: ..... is your man cave open? B)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Also:

Weather Underground

Intellicast

We used these along with the others when I worked the LE Command Center in Miami during Katrina and several other nasty ones.

If you're in the path, leave. Hurricanes are serious things. No time to party like some idiots do. Lock up and hit the road. If you are in a coastal area without strong hurricane building codes (like most of the NE) you will serve no purpose by staying in your house. You won't be able to save it. You'll just die. Board up. Get out and go inland. Do it soon.

I'm hoping this thing loses it's punch as it hits cooler water and land mass.

 

Hurricanes are like earthquakes. If you've never been through one it's hard to understand and appreciate their power and your helplessness.

+1 Right. Thankfully, though, the winds are forecast to significantly decrease as it goes north. Hopefully it'll just be a wakeup call for safety.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I looked at the National Weather Service about 20 minutes ago and the prediction for Central CT has been downgraded to tropical storm. Nothing to take lightly, but not the End of Everything they were predicting a couple of days ago.

 

Probably be on the couch with the dog reading or napping.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I got the call from the town's emergency services tellling me where I could get shelter, water, food in case of an emergency.

 

I remember bailing water from a pond in the past.

 

 

Among my fondest memories of The Germinator are those times we had to endure a power outage, the longest were 7 and 9 days. During the last one we went in search of an internet cafe so we could check our email.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Also:

Weather Underground

Intellicast

We used these along with the others when I worked the LE Command Center in Miami during Katrina and several other nasty ones.

If you're in the path, leave. Hurricanes are serious things. No time to party like some idiots do. Lock up and hit the road. If you are in a coastal area without strong hurricane building codes (like most of the NE) you will serve no purpose by staying in your house. You won't be able to save it. You'll just die. Board up. Get out and go inland. Do it soon.

I'm hoping this thing loses it's punch as it hits cooler water and land mass.

 

Hurricanes are like earthquakes. If you've never been through one it's hard to understand and appreciate their power and your helplessness.

 

Damn good, straight talk from someone who knows. Thanks Bob

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I got the call from the town's emergency services tellling me where I could get shelter, water, food in case of an emergency.

 

I remember bailing water from a pond in the past.

 

 

Among my fondest memories of The Germinator are those times we had to endure a power outage, the longest were 7 and 9 days. During the last one we went in search of an internet cafe so we could check our email.

I wish you the best of luck, there, Marshall, and it may also be good that the wind is supposed to be nearer to 60 or 50-ish or so by the time it gets up to New Hampshire, if that's where you are. so hopefully it won't do too much damage at that speed.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Also:

Weather Underground

Intellicast

We used these along with the others when I worked the LE Command Center in Miami during Katrina and several other nasty ones.

If you're in the path, leave. Hurricanes are serious things. No time to party like some idiots do. Lock up and hit the road. If you are in a coastal area without strong hurricane building codes (like most of the NE) you will serve no purpose by staying in your house. You won't be able to save it. You'll just die. Board up. Get out and go inland. Do it soon.

I'm hoping this thing loses it's punch as it hits cooler water and land mass.

 

Hurricanes are like earthquakes. If you've never been through one it's hard to understand and appreciate their power and your helplessness.

 

That's a bit pessimistic, I have been through more one, Carol, Diane, Gloria, and Helene. I suppose the biggent problem I have is that we elected to have a small yard and a lot of trees. However, New England construction is strong enough that sleeping on the first floor will protect me, and if it doesn't well, it was nice knowing ya. And they don't punch as hard up here anyway.

Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a bit pessimistic, I have been through more one, Carol, Diane, Gloria, and Helene. I suppose the biggent problem I have is that we elected to have a small yard and a lot of trees. However, New England construction is strong enough that sleeping on the first floor will protect me, and if it doesn't well, it was nice knowing ya. And they don't punch as hard up here anyway.

 

Not pessimistic. Realistic.

A category 1 is strong but rideable.

A category 2 is not good but survivable in a good structure.

A category 3 is an ass kicker and can kill you in a heartbeat if you're not prepared. Cat 4 and 5... fuggedabout it.

 

The biggest killer in hurricanes(except maybe in cat 4 and 5s) is water, not houses blowing over. If you are inland and high you're probably okay. New England construction is pretty strong but really bot up to withstanding 120mpg winds. I've seen brick and CBS structures fail after 4 or 5 hours if that kind of pressure.

Hopefully the cooler waters will take some of the punch out of this bitch. The one that hit the NE in '38in '54 killed about 800 people along the coast.

With any luck we'll be laughing about the traffic jams in NYC by next week and everyone will say. What a wimpy storm.

But you never know..

Link to post
Share on other sites

Not pessimistic. Realistic.

A category 1 is strong but rideable.

A category 2 is not good but survivable in a good structure.

A category 3 is an ass kicker and can kill you in a heartbeat if you're not prepared. Cat 4 and 5... fuggedabout it.

 

The biggest killer in hurricanes(except maybe in cat 4 and 5s) is water, not houses blowing over. If you are inland and high you're probably okay. New England construction is pretty strong but really bot up to withstanding 120mpg winds. I've seen brick and CBS structures fail after 4 or 5 hours if that kind of pressure.

Hopefully the cooler waters will take some of the punch out of this bitch. The one that hit the NE in '38in '54 killed about 800 people along the coast.

With any luck we'll be laughing about the traffic jams in NYC by next week and everyone will say. What a wimpy storm.

But you never know..

 

Some folks, ya just can't tell........

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are in a low-lying community on the east coast, and think a Cat 2 storm is not worth worrying about, check out these pictures of what Hurricane Ike, another Cat 2 storm, did to the coast of Texas in 2008. http://www.boston.co...ostPop_Emailed1

 

Remember that Houston is around 50 miles inland. We had relatively little damage at our house from Ike (blown down fence and some trim ripped off the house), but we were lucky. A lot of folks even further from the coast lost their entire roof!

 

The water damage from the storm surge was unreal on the coastline..Look real close at pictures 11-13 in the link above. Those were from locations right on the coast...Gilchrist, Galveston, Surfside, Crystal Beach.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Of course one of the worst things about a storm is having to watch the idiot reporters who have to stand:

 

1. On The Beach - so we can know what Big Waves look like

2. In the street in hunnert mile per hour winds - so we know what Strong Wind looks like

3. In front of a blowed off roof

4. In front of some blowed over trees

5. Up to their butts on a flooded road or parking lot so we know what a flooded road/parking lot looks like...

 

Actually the only purpose these shots serve is to show us what an idiot looks like. :blink:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Got off the phone with brother and sister in law down in Davie FL to check my prep work. They advised to take a/c unit out of window unless it was bolted down to a real strong mount. So that one is now on the floor in the living room and the storm window is down there as well.

 

All of this reminds me of a line from one of Ron White's routines... "Its not that the wind is blowing, its WHAT the wind is blowing."

 

Sure hope this holds off long enough to watch the first episode of the new Dr Who season tomorrow night. :angry:

Link to post
Share on other sites

if it plays nice and heads where the track say it will (BTW I have seldom seen so many different computer models in such close agreement ) it will pass well inland of the Mid coast of Main which means lots and lots of rain... I lived for 40 years on and off on Nantucket Island and we had little option other than shelter in place and I weathered quite a few big storms there including on in the mid 50s that put the mast of a 60' sloop through the living room wall of the rental we were in and of course Esther that cut off smiths point from the island and created esters island

 

I flew Lifeguard air ambulance flights durring some of the storms between 1967 and 85 and while the summer storms... some of them were bad; worst of all were the winter Nor Easters in terms of actual damage to buildings 80mph and 80f does less damage than 80mph at 20f

 

But yes if they tell you to go then go staying to watch is nuts you can see the folks from the weather channel that get payed to take the risks on tv and be comfortable and dry while you do it

Link to post
Share on other sites

My daughter lives near the moutains of NC.

 

Called her today and she said it was raining a little, but had lighting last night.

 

All my children are out of the danger zone, thank da Lord !

Link to post
Share on other sites

My sister lives along the coast in TX, around Corpus... I could never understand why with the storms and bugs.. The people are sweet, spend some vacation time there.

 

My prayers are with the eastern seaboard this evening, I can almost feel the fears that must be in their hearts tonight. I hope that the sun brings up a perfect day tomorrow for them with no damages to speak of and no loss of life. Storms rattle me.. I don't know how people do it..

Link to post
Share on other sites

Not pessimistic. Realistic.

A category 1 is strong but rideable.

A category 2 is not good but survivable in a good structure.

A category 3 is an ass kicker and can kill you in a heartbeat if you're not prepared. Cat 4 and 5... fuggedabout it.

 

The biggest killer in hurricanes(except maybe in cat 4 and 5s) is water, not houses blowing over. If you are inland and high you're probably okay. New England construction is pretty strong but really bot up to withstanding 120mpg winds. I've seen brick and CBS structures fail after 4 or 5 hours if that kind of pressure.

Hopefully the cooler waters will take some of the punch out of this bitch. The one that hit the NE in '38in '54 killed about 800 people along the coast.

With any luck we'll be laughing about the traffic jams in NYC by next week and everyone will say. What a wimpy storm.

But you never know..

 

Yeah, I over simplified it, earlier. The hurricanes are down to about 60-70 mph by the time they get here, Cat 2 or more would be scary indeed. The weaker trees go down but they get culled every winter so most of the standing ones are pretty strong. I do have some monster hemlocks but I'll cross my fingers.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It looks like winds are going to be a little stronger than earlier predicted http://www.weather.com/maps/news/atlstorm9/projectedpath_large.html

 

It looks like it'll be mostly a category 1 up the eastern seaboard, decreasing to a tropical storm by the time it reaches Maine. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/sshws_table.shtml?large

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm in Sneads Ferry NC,I'm staying in a condo on the land side of the intercoastal waterway. So far one of the fishing piers out on the "island" has washed away From my window I can see water over the fixed walkways and the boat slips in the marina Heavy winds, but the eye came ashore about 35 miles north of us, and the wind/rain hasn't been as bad here as some of the other places.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Also:

Weather Underground

Intellicast

We used these along with the others when I worked the LE Command Center in Miami during Katrina and several other nasty ones.

If you're in the path, leave. Hurricanes are serious things. No time to party like some idiots do. Lock up and hit the road. If you are in a coastal area without strong hurricane building codes (like most of the NE) you will serve no purpose by staying in your house. You won't be able to save it. You'll just die. Board up. Get out and go inland. Do it soon.

I'm hoping this thing loses it's punch as it hits cooler water and land mass.

 

Hurricanes are like earthquakes. If you've never been through one it's hard to understand and appreciate their power and your helplessness.

 

Case in point

Idiot on the beach

Link to post
Share on other sites

I sure as hell hope the Coast Guard or whoever is watching the beaches tells these nimrods "you get pulled in, fall in, washed out to sea we AINT coming to get your dumb ass, copy that?"

 

Saw one this AM on the weather channel where two of em were out on the beach and one looks like he's being stripped by the wind he tells the other guy he should have spent more on his poncho.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am so underwhelmed by the "bravery" (as one anchor put it) of these reporters I have writ them a pome.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am so underwhelmed by the "bravery" (as one anchor put it) of these reporters I have writ them a pome.

 

 

 

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I stopped on the way home from the camp to get a coffee and a customer in line at 7-11 was telling the clerk how they were preparing for the storm...Said they had ice and food and water, which sounded good. Then he said how they had turned off most of their lights to conserve power. Huh? Yeah they were doing it for when the power went out!!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I stopped on the way home from the camp to get a coffee and a customer in line at 7-11 was telling the clerk how they were preparing for the storm...Said they had ice and food and water, which sounded good. Then he said how they had turned off most of their lights to conserve power. Huh? Yeah they were doing it for when the power went out!!

 

And yet they are still allowed to reproduce.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Of course one of the worst things about a storm is having to watch the idiot reporters who have to stand:

 

1. On The Beach - so we can know what Big Waves look like

2. In the street in hunnert mile per hour winds - so we know what Strong Wind looks like

3. In front of a blowed off roof

4. In front of some blowed over trees

5. Up to their butts on a flooded road or parking lot so we know what a flooded road/parking lot looks like...

 

Actually the only purpose these shots serve is to show us what an idiot looks like. :blink:

That always kills me. You always know who the newest guy or gal on the Weather Channel is! :lol: They're the ones hanging sideways on a palm tree saying "Yeah, it's raining awful hard and the wind's blowin' like HELL!"

 

DUH!! You're in a HURRICANE!!!. That's what hurricanes do. That's their job. That's what the last one did. And the one before that. And the one......And I'm not even a meteoriteologist. :huh:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Watched a few minutes this morning of the reports from New York. Nothing happened and they are trying as hard as they can to stretch that into a story.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.