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You are looking at a real American hero right there. Faris Tuohy is holding a photo from 1944. That’s him on the left, holding a cup of coffee, after two days of battle in WWII. He’s 94 now, he’ll be 95 in April. “Thank you” just doesn’t seem enough. I appreciate the men and women who put their lives on the line for our freedoms so much.
 
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SALUTE!:FlagAm:

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Joe, if you get the chance, can you please give us another link or post the text.  I don't get Faced so I can't read it.

 

Thank you!!

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1 hour ago, Calamity Kris said:

Joe, if you get the chance, can you please give us another link or post the text.  I don't get Faced so I can't read it.

 

Thank you!!

'So let it be written, so let it be done!

 

Quote

You are looking at a real American hero right there. Faris Tuohy is holding a photo from 1944. That’s him on the left, holding a cup of coffee, after two days of battle in WWII. He’s 94 now, he’ll be 95 in April. “Thank you” just doesn’t seem enough. I appreciate the men and women who put their lives on the line for our freedoms so much.



From this guy: https://www.fox13news.com/person/b/charley-belcher

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yes indeed and there are so few of them left now , as many thankyous as possible please 

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He looks like he was a real warrior back in the day.

 

Thank you Faris.

 

America :FlagAm:

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7 hours ago, Sixgun Sheridan said:

I remember that photo from an old WW2 book of mine. If I recall correctly he and his buddies had just been rescued from a sinking ship.

 

Caption: 
Left, USMC Private First Class Faris "Bob" M. Tuohy (1924- ) of the 3rd Battalion, independent 22nd Marine Regiment, drinks coffee in the mess aboard USS Arthur Middleton (APA-25) after surviving the two-day fight for Engebi in Eniwetok Atoll. The 1st and 2nd Battalions of the 22nd Marines secured the island, killing 736 Japanese soldiers and Korean laborers. Only nineteen surrendered. This photo was passed by American censors and widely distributed, one of the few wartime releases to show the psychological effects of war. At right, Private First Class Stephen Garboski (1921-1944) of Ringoes, New Jersey, also recuperates with coffee. On Guam in July 1944, Garboski was one of 1,147 men of the 1st Provisional Marine Brigade (which by then included the 22nd Marines) killed in action. Tuohy states he was a victim of friendly fire when USAAF aircraft attacked Marine positions. Tuohy also believes the man in the center was killed by the Japanese on Okinawa.
Caption Written By: 
Jason McDonald
Photographed By: 
Platnick
Photographer's Rank or Affiliation: 
Photographer's Mate, United Stat
Archive: 
National Archives
Date Photographed: 
Saturday, February 19, 1944
City: 
Off Engebi
State/Province/Oblast: 
Eniwetok
Country: 
Marshalls
Copyright Notice: 
Caption ©2007 MFA Productions LLC Image in the Public Domain
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Posted (edited)

Another from the USS Arthur Middleton:

Rifleman of 22nd Marine RCT Boards USS Middleton (APA-25) After Battle of Engebi

 
 
wwii1674.jpg
wwii1674.jpg?itok=0yQIwl0E
Caption: 
United States Marine Corps Private Theodore James Miller (February 12, 1925 - March 24, 1944) of Hennepin County, Minnesota assigned to Company K, 3rd Battalion, 22nd Marine Independent Regiment returns to Coast Guard-manned attack transport USS Arthur Middleton (APA-25) at 1400 Hours after two days of combat on Engebi. Engebi was the first of the Eniwetok Atoll to be invaded by American forces. In Operation "Fragile" the 1st and 2nd Battalions landed on February 18, 1944, with 3rd Battalion in reserve. Opposing the landing force was Colonel Toshio Yano and the 3rd Battalion of the 1st Mobile Shipborne Brigade, which numbered 736 officers and men, including 44 personnel from the 61st Keibitai (garrison) detachment. In addition to his men's rifles and sidearms, Yano had available two flame throwers, two 75mm mountain guns, three 20mm guns, two 120mm naval guns, two twin-mount 13mm AA machine guns, three light tanks and a variety of machine guns, mortars, and grenade dischargers. Because they themselves landed only six weeks before the American onslaught, the Japanese did not have time to prepare the kind of defenses encountered at Tarawa and Iwo Jima. Instead they prepared trenches covered with palm fronds and camouflage called "spider holes." Marines threw in smoke grenades, pinpointed the exits, and attacked with mortars, flamethrowers and explosives. In the attack on Engebi American losses were 78 killed, 166 wounded, and 7 missing, totaling 251 casualties. All of Engebi's defenders were killed, except for nineteen prisoners taken. Miller himself was killed during the invasion of Ebon Atoll a month later. 25 Japanese, including six civilians (two women and two children among them), put up a 20-minute fire-fight that left Miller and another Marine dead and eight others wounded. Seventeen Japanese, including one woman, were killed. Marshallese natives brought the children to safety behind American lines. Ebon was declared secure after the Japanese radio station was destroyed and all Japanese civilians killed or captured. Ebon was abandoned by American forces on March 25, 1944. This photo, widely distributed in the United States after Miller's death, was one of the few to openly portray the stress of combat to the American public.
Caption Written By: 
Jason McDonald
Photographed By: 
Platnick
Photographer's Rank or Affiliation: 
Photographer's Mate, United Stat
Archive: 
National Archives
Date Photographed: 
Saturday, February 19, 1944
City: 
Off Engebi
State/Province/Oblast: 
Eniwetok
Country: 
Marshalls
Copyright Notice: 
Caption ©2007 MFA Productions LLC Image in the Public Domain

 

Edited by Subdeacon Joe
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