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Trigger Mike

speaking of karate-training question

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I've been watching my daughter at some of her karate classes. I'm concerned they are not really teaching them anything but could be wrong. they have student trainers mostly adult women who help out but they too seem unable to perform some of the task. supposedly they are training her to get the yellow belt after white. so they have them stretch, then kick with the right foot 10 times, then the left foot 10 times then switch off then go to something else and do that 10 times. the student trainers will give my daughter points but they all kick weakly or barely hit the foam mats they hold on their arms. i don't see a lot of force from anyone. if they are trying to put their leg behind the opponent an trip them they usually fall fairly easily but when she fights her brother he gets away. when i grab her to test her i can tell what she is trying to do but she does not take me down. then after 45 minutes they go home and 2 nights later learn soothing else or possibly repeat something from an earlier class. i still see the student trainers being corrected by the main instructor. is that how karate classes go?

 

sometimes i will ask my daughter if they told her when to use the various kicks etc she learned, she gets defensive and says yes so i asked when then, and get no answer. other than the purse snatcher defense i have not heard them say when to use what.

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You need to check on the reputation of the dojo. Look for reviews on line.

Now one thing is that martial arts for children is as much about building self confidence and discipline as it is the actual fighting. It takes many years to build a warrior.

Could be they take things very slow with kids.

Or could be they just take money. Do some investigating.

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My kids(14 and 15) have been going to an MMA class for 4 years and both just earned their 1st degree Black Belts. That being said, neither one of them could take me in a fight. Most karate classes don't train hardened street fighters. It is very much about discipline, teamwork and exercise. They have been taught some take-down techniques and some weapon retention/take-away moves, which might come in handy. It sounds like your daughter has just started, give it a more time as the instructing tends to go a bit slow. You are probably like me when my kids first started, thinking Black Belt means Chuck Norris. it doesn't. It doesn't make it worthless training though.

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White belt is the very basic starting place. You have to learn to stand before you can walk and walk before you can run. Every block, kick and punch must be learned and perfected before a student can move on. These are the building blocks that insure a strong foundation and must become instinctive.

Some children learn faster than others, some are more athletic and some are more focused and mature. There is little more frustrating than trying to teach a child who doesn't want to be there. Don't get in a hurry every child progresses at their own rate. If the school promises a black belt in an unreasonable amount of time please find another school. There is no such thing as a nine year old black belt. If it's not earned it's less than worthless it's downright dangerous.

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Between this and your other post it's clear you have lost confidence in this outfit. Time to move on.

 

Do you really expect a 13yo female 2 months into training to be able to take down grown man?

Edited by Shootin' Shu

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Sounds like Tae-Kwon-Do.

If my child wanted to take Karate I would look into a Japanese or Okinowan discipline like Shorin Ryu. Or MMA that doesn't put all of it's emphasis on kicks and leg work. Especially for girls and women. Why? Because a woman should learn to defend herself up close as well as fend off and attacker at "leg length". I have tangled with many a man that used Tae-Kwon-Do (spelling?). Once you get in close to them and they can't kick you can dominate the fight easily.

 

That being said you should know that the first year or so of training is all basic stuff especially at only 2 times a week in classes. Emphasis is on stances, basic moves and discipline. If she were in any Japanese style class she would spend a lot of time in stances throwing punches. They have to learn muscle control, balance, self-discipline first then they can move up in training. What looks silly and useless to the observer is important for the basics. Also, often people discount the basics as a waste of time as it looks useless but any student that has the self discipline and desire to succeed in the sport will do it over and over and it will show the instructor that they have the desire and the fortitude to be worthy of instruction.It's not a one way street. A good instructor isn't going to waste time on a "belt collector" but many somewhat unscrupulous ones will, chasing that all mighty dollar.

 

I would look into the awards and wins of the people running this "dojo" and especially those they have trained. Do a search of competitions and look at their standings and accreditation. Do the same with any self defense discipline. Just because some joker has won some fights / matches doesn't mean they are a good instructor. Also, regarding things like MMA, just because the instructor served in the military or was in an elite force also does not mean they are a good instructor. Look into the accomplishments of those that they trained. That goes for all fighting disciplines.

 

My 2 cents...and no, I never earned a black belt. I did earn confidence, discipline and self awareness. I had an awesome instructor that wasn't about belt standings. I have beaten a few black belts in my time at matches though but that was many years ago and those stories are for another time.

 

This is about your daughter and what you want that is best for her.

 

One final thought (my opinion). It sounds to me like this is more of a karate hobby shop. I would look for a smaller dojo with a dedicated instruction staff. One that is about the discipline not the belts and larger classes. Regardless of the style, Japanese, Chinese, or Korean, your daughtrr will do better. Get her started on the right path. She can decide what style or discipline fits her later on once she has a very good understanding of herself and her capabilities.

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Avoid a dojo that is part of a chain

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this dojo is the only game in town. every 3 months they test for the next belt and each test cost an additional $50. the nearest town that might have a better program is at least 45 minutes away.

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They test for the next belt every 3 months? Run like hell!

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They test for the next belt every 3 months? Run like hell!

Make sure you roll your window up when you drive by. They'll throw a black belt in your dar.

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i guess the 3 months for a higher belt means that i was right in thinking they train for a test and not for actual karate? how long should it be between test?

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The higher the belt level the longer between tests. White to yellow should be as least five months minimum. As the material becomes more involved and more is required at each level the tests are further apart. From brown to black will take two years probably close to three because all our material unlike some disciplines is cumulative. My black belt test took seven hours. Every student progresses at different rates so remember that your child may progress faster or slower

Edited by Henry T Harrison

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this dojo is the only game in town. every 3 months they test for the next belt and each test cost an additional $50. the nearest town that might have a better program is at least 45 minutes away.

 

The "every three months" doesn't bother me quite as much as the $50, depending on the circumstances.

 

First, I have seen a number of reputable instructors do testing at set intervals. Not everyone tests, only those who have planned to test ahead of time. The instructor lets someone know if they are ready to test or not.

 

Second, those testing (and their parent/guardian) have a clear understanding of what the material to be covered in the test is, the purpose and how it fits into the curriculum.

 

Third, much testing at that level is done to give positive reinforcement, and to instill confidence and a sense of progress, that basics are being accomplished. Techniques are generally correct and knowledge grasped. As Henry T. Harrison mentioned, testing for more advanced levels takes more and more time.

 

Finally, the cost definitely seems high to me, and I would want to understand what it goes toward. Association fees? Something else? I am assuming the fee is only paid if the student passes and progresses.

Edited by DocWard

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We do stripe testing every month but only when the child is ready. Belt tests are individually scheduled and we will only let a child test when we are sure they will pass, and that we is collective meaning more than one instructor must think the child is ready. Stripe testing is free belt testing does have a fee

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We do stripe testing every month but only when the child is ready. Belt tests are individually scheduled and we will only let a child test when we are sure they will pass, and that we is collective meaning more than one instructor must think the child is ready. Stripe testing is free belt testing does have a fee

 

I know not all systems or dojos use stripes, but it is a good way to give positive reinforcement.

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Think of martial arts as learning a new language and evaluate accordingly.

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