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Belling the case for seating lead bullets


Sixgun Symphony #62632

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I have always used the minimum amount needed to just start the bullet.

 

True dat! Just a flair is all that is needed, if you can feel it it's probably enough.

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I speak with great experience for the other way...not belling enough. Had all kinds of lead shavings on my bullets and had to wipe them down before running them through the case gauge. There is a fine line between too much and not enough. Like was posted above..just enough to get the bullet in the brass without having lead shavings when you run the bullet seating die in the brass.

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Flat based bullets require more than bevel based bullets. Lead Alloy is an other factor to consider, the harder the alloy the less belling/expansion required.

 

Use what ever minimum it takes to get the seating position started. ;)

 

Your next question will be how much crimp,right ?

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True dat! Just a flair is all that is needed, if you can feel it it's probably enough.

 

Agreed. It doesn't even have to be enough to be visible, just enough to get the bullet started. The constant reversal of belling and crimping is hard on cases if you overdo it.

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What is "normal"?
The normal that I use for both CAS & BPCR is 1/2 of the base is seated in the belled case. With this width, no part of the base is shaved when the bullet is fully seated.

 

For CAS, the Dillon 550B does the neck expansion and belling. I pay no attention to the amount of neck expansion, just the bell.

For BPCR reloads, I have multiple expander plugs that expand the case mouths 0.001 to 0.002 for neck tension on the whole bullet when it is fully seated and flare the mouth so 1/2 of the base is covered by the case mouth when the bullet is set on the case for seating

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I've got a really touchy Lee die. It's way too easy to go from just right to can't-fit-into-the-seating-die.

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Sorry, but I couldn't copy the picture but if you download the Dillon Manual and look on pg 12 fig 43, you'll see a picture of proper belling.

 

http://www.dillonhelp.com/manuals/english/Dillon-XL650-Manual-May-2007.pdf

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:FlagAm::FlagAm::FlagAm::FlagAm::FlagAm:

 

If you've belled them enough that it'd show in a photograph, then you've opened them up too much. :o

The bullets should just start in the case about to the top of the bottom band.

I use a Lyman T Mag and do my .44's .45's in blocks of 50 at a time. I put all the bullets on top of the primed, belled charged cases. The bullets fit fine and stay upright as I run them into the seater/crimer die.

 

I should mention that .44-40 brass is thin and extra care needs to be taken.

 

Mustang Gregg

Castin' & Blastin'

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The 44-40 is extra touchy because the brass neck is so thin. I shoot a flat based bullet and my brass is belled to the point that I cannot set a bullet straight down into it. I have to start the bullet on one side and tilt it in.

Too much and you tend to wear the brass out. Too little and you crumple necks.

Ya just have to try it till it works for you and go with that.

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Mileage may vary but...

 

You may want to sort your brass by brand. Some brass is thicker than others at the mouth.

 

Also sort by age, (# of times fired) Bottle-necked cases start to lengthen after repeated reloading which can vary both the amount of belling & the point of crimping.

 

I had a habit of using a small batch of cases & then adding some to replace losses through "lost brass matches" or reloading wear. Large lots are better for consistency.

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