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A commercial just diagnosed me with ptsd


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I'm watching Perry Mason and a Wounded Warior Project commercial came on and the little girl described how they were late for school and her dad started yelling at her and the dad said he went full on drill sergeant.   

 

Suddenly my wife chuckles and comments  "They act like it is unusual " .  

 

I'm thinking I was raised that way as before my dad went to Vietnam he was a drill sergeant.   I thought full on drill sergeant was how it was done.  Now I find out full on drill sergeant is ptsd.  That also means my dad must have had ptsd.  

 

Recently my mom let me read a copy of the letter my dad wrote the VA to get disability for ptsd.  In it he mentioned he was angry and went off a lot scaring the family.  I thought it was normal.  

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oddly enough i think a lot of us did - my father was WWII tho , in the end when he was dying i mentioned to him he was hard but i appreciated what he taught me , i never heard of PTSD till guys my age were being diagnosed with it in the 90s , most of my VN friends were and are haunted by memories but most just acted like parents when they were raising their kids , we didnt have near the trouble in schools back then , just sayin , 

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I do know when I got to basic training,  it was a piece of cake.  My dad bounced quarters off my bed growing up and looked for hospital corners and if my pants seams were not lined up on the hanger, everything was jerked off the hanger.  

 

I kept waiting for the drill sergeant to do the same and they never did.  They'd yell but my dad was better at it.   

 

I noticed two football coaches yell at my son for two 10 yard penalties in a row and my son didn't realize they were yelling at home, so I might be doing something right. 

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I worked with a Vietnam veteran who seen a lot of combat.  Still 30 years later, you get into a conversation with him of any length and he will start to relate his combat experience. He obviously could never get it out of his mind. 

 

Dad was a WWII veteran, European Theater.  He never brought up any real ugly details.  But you couldn't whistle around him. An otherwise gentile, soft spoken man would get angry and yell at me to stop.  I asked mom about and she said it reminded him of the whistle of incoming German bombs.  

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1 hour ago, Pat Riot, SASS #13748 said:

PTSD comes from other things besides war. You definitely do not want a diagnosis as having PTSD by any doctor of psychiatry. It would change your life as you know it.

I can only imagine.   I get worried about vets who file for disability due to ptsd.  I fear they do not understand the consequences besides maybe a monthly check.   Personally I doubt I have ptsd.  

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10 hours ago, Trigger Mike said:

I'm watching Perry Mason and a Wounded Warior Project commercial came on and the little girl described how they were late for school and her dad started yelling at her and the dad said he went full on drill sergeant.   

 

Suddenly my wife chuckles and comments  "They act like it is unusual " .  

 

I'm thinking I was raised that way as before my dad went to Vietnam he was a drill sergeant.   I thought full on drill sergeant was how it was done.  Now I find out full on drill sergeant is ptsd.  That also means my dad must have had ptsd.  

 

Recently my mom let me read a copy of the letter my dad wrote the VA to get disability for ptsd.  In it he mentioned he was angry and went off a lot scaring the family.  I thought it was normal.  

 

My VA counselor gave me the government definition of PTSD and it included any traumatic experience. I related that birth is a traumatic experience therefor everyone has PTSD according to the government. She had no response.

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My dad said to the VA that he kept seeing some people from Vietnam but he stopped seeing them after he shot them.  She told my mom to get rid of the guns as he was homicidal and suicidal.   She said she did but kept them anyway. I don't think they have a clue

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In my opinion,  it's too easy to be disabled.  When we ran a sawmill we had a customer bring us logs that he cut and manhandled onto a trailer.  He'd often load the lumber and would have to unload it when he got home.  His license plate had a disabled veteran emblem on it. I asked him if his disability was a result of his military service.  No. He was some technician for a communication company and working at a desk at a keyboard ruined his shoulders and back. 100% disability.  But I'd guess being at least 100 lb overweight may have been a factor. 

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6 hours ago, Warden Callaway said:

In my opinion,  it's too easy to be disabled.  When we ran a sawmill we had a customer bring us logs that he cut and manhandled onto a trailer.  He'd often load the lumber and would have to unload it when he got home.  His license plate had a disabled veteran emblem on it. I asked him if his disability was a result of his military service.  No. He was some technician for a communication company and working at a desk at a keyboard ruined his shoulders and back. 100% disability.  But I'd guess being at least 100 lb overweight may have been a factor. 

 

In Missouri you have to mail in a copy of your disability papers from VA in order to obtain a disabled veteran plate. Which shows that the disabling factor was service connected.

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46 minutes ago, Smoken D said:

 

In Missouri you have to mail in a copy of your disability papers from VA in order to obtain a disabled veteran plate. Which shows that the disabling factor was service connected.

 

I would have thought there would be some service disability involved but that's the story the man told me.  Maybe he doesn't want to explain? 

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I used to have a neighbor who was a 'Nam vet, and he spooked very easily. I had to make noise whenever I approached him while he was busy doing something. Once I failed to do so and he nearly jumped out of his skin. He also couldn't stand 4th of July fireworks.

 

On a lighter note, I wonder how Barbarians or Roman Legion vets dealt with PTSD? Did they have a panic attack whenever they heard kitchen knives being banged together?

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Didn't think it was a disorder at the time but for maybe 10 yrs after my VN experience I would assume body bag defilade when a car would backfire.  The only nightmares I had were ones involving being recalled to active duty. 

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