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Marshal Max Henry

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I know its been done but im new so.....My Fav of all times is Outlaw Josey Wales but what i wonder is From the 1950's until now What was the most realistic? The Unforgivin and Open Range seems to be but i have no where nere seen every Cowboy movie. Does anyone have an opinion on the most accurate depiction of the Old West circa 1865-1885

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<snip>Does anyone have an opinion on the most accurate depiction of the Old West circa 1865-1885

 

Blazing Saddles!

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What Okie said. The Spaghetti Westerns brought the road to realistic movies. I wouldn't say they were realistic but they were more than the pre 50's movies. Remember it was the 1920's Hollywood that brought the drop holster. I think it was "Outlaw Josey Wales" that was the first "more realistic" western.

 

I love'm all. Take'em for what they are and enjoy the guns, clothes, horses, wagons, women and buildings!

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Tombstone, Unforgiven, Open Range, Riders of the Purple Sage and Apaloosa in my opinion are the most accurate historically but then again I wasn't there back then so I don't REALLY know! :FlagAm:

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I know its been done but im new so.....My Fav of all times is Outlaw Josey Wales but what i wonder is From the 1950's until now What was the most realistic? The Unforgivin and Open Range seems to be but i have no where nere seen every Cowboy movie. Does anyone have an opinion on the most accurate depiction of the Old West circa 1865-1885

 

 

I like everythin' western!! :D

 

 

It's hollywood, so it's all as da director wants! :FlagAm:

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Not really a "movie", but the TV series "Deadwood" seemed realistic in terms of sets, costumes, and human frailty.

 

Can't say about the dialogue though... :D

 

"Rough Riders", with Tom Berenger as Theodore Roosevelt had some historical basis, too.

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After further review I'd have to add Crossfire Trail, The Sacketts, and the Gunsmoke movies that were made after the show ended on TV. :D

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I loved the series "Deadwood" It seemed very realistic. and I know they cussed back then but i dont know if M@#$er FU#$@r and C$#CK SU@#%R where used so much. But the plot seemed very REAL. The Characters were real I looked into it. I have heard a lot about Apaloosa but dont know anything about it. Who was in it and What year was it made?

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OK, my favorite western movie is..........a 25-way tie. The ones I watch over and over, whenever they're on tv are The Searchers, Hondo, The Long Riders, and Tombstone. They are all "Classic westerns." Near as I can tell, there are no western movies that are completely authentic. John Wayne used an 1873 Colt's SAA and an 1892 Winchester rifle in movies set in 1841 (The Commancheros,) 1868 (The Searchers) and many more. Appaloosa was very authentic, but all of Parkers books in that weatern series featured the main characters fast draw skills, which are not mentioned in any historical writings of the real "Old West" Then there's Doc Holidays double barreled shotgun that somehow could be fired three times without reloading, (1) Charlie Waites amazing 10 shot 6-shooter, and so on. Tom Sellecks westerns are very authentic as far as firearms and equipment goes, but the hats are 1920s Hollywood. Then there's the part in some movies where the hero is out of ammo or luck or both and about to be killed by the villian when the wife or girlfriend shoots the bad guy. (High Noon, The Mountain Men, one of Sellecks movies, probably several more before that and more to come I'm sure)

 

(1) that has since been edited out of "Tombstone.)

 

HOWEVER these are all excellent western movies that I enjoy watching.

 

 

Himself, The O'Meara

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Anyone Have Info on the movie Apaloosa?

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Here ya go

 

Info on Apaloosa

 

pretty good one overall. The book was better. I just couldn't stand Rene Zellweger. But thats just me.

 

 

Thanks Pard

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  • 1 year later...
Does anyone have an opinion on the most accurate depiction of the Old West
Stan Kittrell[/url]' timestamp='0' post='0']It was filmed in Cache Oklahoma in 1907, and it's called

 

1. It was filmed in a real Old West town, not a movie set;

 

2. There are no professional actors. The head bank robber is a real (reformed) old west outlaw bank robber. The towns people are real old West people, and the lawmen are real U.S. Marshals. They include Bill Tighlman and Heck Thomas. Also appearing in the movie is Quannah Parker, who was a real, honest to goodness, Comanche War Chief.

 

3. The plot is sketchy and the photography is horrible (it's best viewed full screen and in a dark room), but when you watch this movie you are watching the real old West, not a re-enactment or portrayal.

 

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Considered by many Historians, writers of Hollywood westerns, and the King of Hollywood westerns, William K Everson, the most realistic westerns ever made by Hollywood would be the William S Hart silent westerns. Be it costuming, settings, (most were filmed in still western towns), props, and firearms. MT

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Tombstone!

There were a lot of things wrong with this movie, historical, and in filming. Even though its one of my top 10. MT

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..the most realistic westerns ever made by Hollywood would be the William S Hart silent westerns. Be it costuming, settings, (most were filmed in still western towns), props, and firearms. MT

I thought he filmed up in Santa Clarita.

 

 

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Tombstone!

 

 

There were a lot of things wrong with this movie, historical, and in filming. Even though its one of my top 10. MT

 

 

I agree, but as far as clothing, I think it's one of the best as far as being period.

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I agree, but as far as clothing, I think it's one of the best as far as being period.

I agree, costuming was outstanding. MT

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I thought he filmed up in Santa Clarita.

 

Ince filmed them in several locations, plus built several sets, western town sites, and an abandoned town northern Ca. Here's a link to W. S. Hart museum. Great place. MT

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=william%20s%20hart%20were%20they%20were%20filmed&source=web&cd=5&cad=rja&ved=0CEAQFjAE&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.hartmuseum.org%2Ffaq.htm&ei=3p5HUL7XHo_C9gTy6oHoDA&usg=AFQjCNGaKvsCU5Fd8SVCiRtZegynJzFvmA

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Be it costuming, settings, (most were filmed in still western towns), props, and firearms. MT
I was up at Harts place with my little brother Spring of 94' I did not leave with the impression that they were using real settings. I could be wrong but It seemed like Hollywood to me. Not much different than the nearby Melody Ranch, or Disney's "Spin & Marty," Golden Oak Ranch across the highway.

 

 

 

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I was up at Harts place with my little brother Spring of 94' I did not leave with the impression that they were using real settings. I could be wrong but It seemed like Hollywood to me. Not much different than the nearby Melody Ranch, or Disney's "Spin & Marty," Golden Oak Ranch across the highway.

 

You decide, check his costume out, about 8: 30 into it, Check out the costuming of the Saloon patrons, and other scenes. Remember the wild west was still alive when these were filmed. There are many different dates given for the end of the "Wild West", the census of 1890, which said there were no more undiscovered frontiers or land to be given, the barb wire fences and no more free roaming, the settling of the indians into reservations. Yet, real cowboys still worked ranches, sixguns carried, real indians used as extras. Remember that how Tim McCoy got his notice, he was an Indian Agent who helped with Indians as extras. No matter, Hollywood used as many standing real sets as possible. There were many abandoned sites around, in fact in Hells Hinges, a section of a real town was burned down. It was an old mining site. MT

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I'm very prejudice to the Tom Selleck movies. I read an in depth article (American Cowboy?) that not only is he the real deal, he insisted that his movies be authentic in not only firearms and dress but in equipment also- saddles, etc.

 

Crossfire Trail, Monte Walsh, Last Stand at Sabre River.... wow.

 

So many good movies, so little time. ^_^

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Quigley Down Under
Crossfire Trail, Monte Walsh, Last Stand at Sabre River.... wow.

You left out The Sacketts (1979). Sam Elliott, Tom Selleck, and Jeff Osterhage had such a good time doing The Sacketts together, they reunited on another 'Louis L'Amour' story, The Shadow Riders, years later. For non-Westerns see Tom Selleck as Jesse Stone (in the correct order). The Jesse Stone series was written by the author of the Monte Walsh (TV movie 2003), and Appaloosa (2008).

 

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