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Question for the guitar pickers.


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Bend those strings til the Hank comes out.

 

Fsharp is the only sharp in the Gmaj scale. So by putting the sharp nomenclature there they don't have to hit the sharp mark after every Fnote on that staff. They are ALL fsharp.

 

I think, long time since I learned scales

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F# is the major seventh of the G maj 7 chord. I don’t get why they wrote it there. 

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It all depends. In this instance appears to be a hymnal or “songbook” opposed to a chart, so everything to the right of the / represents the bassline walking to the F# whilst the rhythm maintains the gmaj7 until they both land on the E together.

 

Rhythm guitar could also walk the bass on the 6th string along with the bassist while maintaining the basic chord structure on the other strings.

 

Think Foggy Mountain Breakdown or Rocky Top, where the G walks down to the E. That’s my guess as to what you’re looking at there. Try it and see.

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2 hours ago, Matt Blasterson, 112488 said:

It all depends. In this instance appears to be a hymnal or “songbook” opposed to a chart, so everything to the right of the / represents the bassline walking to the F# whilst the rhythm maintains the gmaj7 until they both land on the E together.

 

Rhythm guitar could also walk the bass on the 6th string along with the bassist while maintaining the basic chord structure on the other strings.

 

Think Foggy Mountain Breakdown or Rocky Top, where the G walks down to the E. That’s my guess as to what you’re looking at there. Try it and see.

So are you saying the notation denotes a progression or slide/hammer-off, and not a single held chord?  That makes much better sense than trying to simultaneously finger two notes on the same string. 

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3 hours ago, Matt Blasterson, 112488 said:

It all depends. In this instance appears to be a hymnal or “songbook” opposed to a chart, so everything to the right of the / represents the bassline walking to the F# whilst the rhythm maintains the gmaj7 until they both land on the E together.

 

Rhythm guitar could also walk the bass on the 6th string along with the bassist while maintaining the basic chord structure on the other strings.

 

Think Foggy Mountain Breakdown or Rocky Top, where the G walks down to the E. That’s my guess as to what you’re looking at there. Try it and see.

Ok I still don’t understand why the F# is notated there since it’s part of the GMaj 7 chord. I think maybe whoever wrote this had his own idea of writing music.

I’ll admit  I’m not the greatest sight reader so this could just be beyond me :o:blink:

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Okay, that second dotted quarter note is a Gmaj7 with the Root (the G on the 6th string) already moving towards resolving on the Em7 on the 1 of the next measure.

 

Can you read music? If so, look at your bass clef. See how the very first note of the first triad is, then look at the second triad/arpeggio, the second and third notes of both arpeggios are the same, but the first triad starts with a G, the second triad starts with an F#. The root is moving ahead to resolve the upcoming chord change (to Em7) on the 1 of the following measure.

I went to Berklee 40 years ago, but I’ll admit, after 35 years working out of Music City, their chart and number system made reading standard notation obsolete for me, because the Nashville system allows pickers to transpose on the fly if the artist can’t nail it in the key it was written in.
 

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It means to play a Gmaj7 chord with an F# bass note.   

 

In the context of the sheet music, it's walking down to the E note in the Em7 - bass note is G (Gmaj7), F# (Gmaj7/F#), E (Em7)

 

 

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Remember in Deliverance, when Roy Clark, playing dueling banjos, told the weird kid, "I'm Lost!"

----Thats how I feel now.  

I think it's what I call a chord transition, but still not sure.

Edited by Dusty Devil Dale
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37 minutes ago, Dusty Devil Dale said:

Remember in Deliverance, when Roy Clark, playing dueling banjos, told the weird kid, "I'm Lost!"

----Thats how I feel now.  

I think it's what I call a chord transition, but still not sure.

 

It looks more complicated in notation than it is in function.

 

Ignoring all the other strings, the Gmaj7 is fingered on the low E string at the 3rd fret.  For the Gmaj7/F#, the low E string is fingered at the 2nd fret (the other 5 strings are fingered exactly the same as the Gmaj7).   Then for the Em7, the low E string is played open (not fingered).

 

3-2-0 on the low string, it's as easy as that.

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18 minutes ago, Bart Slade said:

 

It looks more complicated in notation than it is in function.

 

Ignoring all the other strings, the Gmaj7 is fingered on the low E string at the 3rd fret.  For the Gmaj7/F#, the low E string is fingered at the 2nd fret (the other 5 strings are fingered exactly the same as the Gmaj7).   Then for the Em7, the low E string is played open (not fingered).

 

3-2-0 on the low string, it's as easy as that.

What he said.

Go watch Lester Flatt, for real. Or any BG band playing Blackberry Blossom.


Or even better, Fire on the Mountain by Marshall Tucker Band. The lick Bart and I are talking about is practically the hook of that song.

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1 hour ago, Bart Slade said:

 

It looks more complicated in notation than it is in function.

 

Ignoring all the other strings, the Gmaj7 is fingered on the low E string at the 3rd fret.  For the Gmaj7/F#, the low E string is fingered at the 2nd fret (the other 5 strings are fingered exactly the same as the Gmaj7).   Then for the Em7, the low E string is played open (not fingered).

 

3-2-0 on the low string, it's as easy as that.

Got it--Thank You !!!

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