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Asking For A Friend...


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So... My friend has two stripped lowers. He already has A Colt and a Windham Weaponry AR, both in 5.56. He likes them the way they are and has no plans to change them for reasons of his own. One has a carry handle and iron sights, the other a red dot.

 

My thought is set one up with a longer barrel, perhaps in .223 Wylde, for slightly longer range shooting, and the possibility of taking coyote if the urge hits. Living in Ohio, it seems .350 Legend might be a good choice for the second. Both offer good ammunition availability, require nothing exotic (he's not really a "tactical" kind of guy), but do offer practicality.

 

Thoughts?

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My thought is fight shy of odd ball calibers. I like time proven. 20 years from now the 5.56, 7.62 NATO, .30/06 and .30/30 will most likely still be around. .223 Wylde and .350 Legend? They may be great performers, but I'd pass.

JMHO, worth what you paid for it. ;)

JHC

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10 minutes ago, Capt. James H. Callahan said:

My thought is fight shy of odd ball calibers. I like time proven. 20 years from now the 5.56, 7.62 NATO, .30/06 and .30/30 will most likely still be around. .223 Wylde and .350 Legend? They may be great performers, but I'd pass.

JMHO, worth what you paid for it. ;)

JHC

 

.223 Wylde is a chambering that is supposed to theoretically get better accuracy out of both .223 Remington and 5.56mm NATO. The .350 Legend has become quite popular here in Ohio as a straight walled deer cartridge (bottleneck rounds aren't legal) giving good performance without the recoil of the .450 Bushmaster. Unless Ohio and other states decide to change laws in that regard, my guess is it is here to stay.

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6 minutes ago, Subdeacon Joe said:

Maybe something in a 7.62 X 39 upper.

 

I thought about that, but I've seen times where other ammo was plentiful, and it wasn't so much.

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For a hunting rifle an 18 or 20" in 350 legend makes sense, combined with a fixed stock and a good scope.

Next I would build a pistol with a 10.5 or 11.5 inch barrel in a 5.56 or Wylde chamber.

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5 minutes ago, DocWard said:

 

I thought about that, but I've seen times where other ammo was plentiful, and it wasn't so much.

7.62 x 39 is just about as expensive as 223/5.56 these days, mostly going for .40 to .45 per round for steel case.

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7 hours ago, Capt. James H. Callahan said:

My thought is fight shy of odd ball calibers. I like time proven. 20 years from now the 5.56, 7.62 NATO, .30/06 and .30/30 will most likely still be around. .223 Wylde and .350 Legend? They may be great performers, but I'd pass.

JMHO, worth what you paid for it. ;)

JHC

 

I forgot to mention, I agree with you completely about odd ball calibers, and steered my friend clear of them. I'm not a whiz when it comes to chamberings and ammo specs and all that, but I did learn a bit while working in a gun store. Here's a bit of info on the .223 Wylde:

https://www.shootingillustrated.com/content/223-wylde-the-ideal-ar-15-chamber/

As for the .350 Legend, if you have the time, here is some info on it. I disabled the link to save space:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FsXJj3YPcLs

 

7 hours ago, Capt. James H. Callahan said:

It would be nice if people that make gun laws knew SOMETHING about guns other than they hate them.

JHC:angry:

 

I can't speak for every state, but in the case for Ohio, my understanding is as follows: While it took time because of some pushback from non-hunting types, particularly in the general public, straightwalled cartridges were eventually approved across the state for good reasons. Ohio has a reasonable white tail population throughout the state, but a large part of the state is relatively flat. The hilly areas are primarily in the Southeastern portion of the state in the Appalachian foothills. While there was some support for high powered rifles, the non-hunting public and their legislators reluctantly supported rifles in the hilly areas, but not the flatter areas. Based on experiences seen in other states, Ohio Division of Natural Resources (ODNR) became concerned that there would be an influx of hunters into those areas, leaving the flatter areas less hunted and subject to over-population, etc... I can't say this is 100% accurate, but it is my understanding.

 

 

7 hours ago, Pat Riot, SASS #13748 said:

I think your friend’s ideas for the two are good ones. ;)


 

 

Thanks! I will... Uhmmm... Pass that along!

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I had an opportunity to pick up a .350 Legend upper a while back But decided to pass as Pennsylvania will not allow semiauto rifles to be used for big game hunting. West Virginia does if the cartridge is larger than .223”. 
I plan to one day have a .350 Legend rifle, mostly because I like the concept of the cartridge. Heck, it just might be a Henry Single Shot. 
 

I have also considered a longer barreled .223 / 5.56 AR for coyote hunting in PA and WV. Before 1976 there were no coyotes in PA. I would like to help make that a reality again. The same goes for WV. 

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1 hour ago, DocWard said:

 

I forgot to mention, I agree with you completely about odd ball calibers, and steered my friend clear of them. I'm not a whiz when it comes to chamberings and ammo specs and all that, but I did learn a bit while working in a gun store. Here's a bit of info on the .223 Wylde:

https://www.shootingillustrated.com/content/223-wylde-the-ideal-ar-15-chamber/

As for the .350 Legend, if you have the time, here is some info on it. I disabled the link to save space:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FsXJj3YPcLs

 

 

I can't speak for every state, but in the case for Ohio, my understanding is as follows: While it took time because of some pushback from non-hunting types, particularly in the general public, straightwalled cartridges were eventually approved across the state for good reasons. Ohio has a reasonable white tail population throughout the state, but a large part of the state is relatively flat. The hilly areas are primarily in the Southeastern portion of the state in the Appalachian foothills. While there was some support for high powered rifles, the non-hunting public and their legislators reluctantly supported rifles in the hilly areas, but not the flatter areas. Based on experiences seen in other states, Ohio Division of Natural Resources (ODNR) became concerned that there would be an influx of hunters into those areas, leaving the flatter areas less hunted and subject to over-population, etc... I can't say this is 100% accurate, but it is my understanding.

 

 

 

Thanks! I will... Uhmmm... Pass that along!

Seems I recall long ago Ohio only allowed shotguns? I guess that's an improvement if so.

JHC

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Indiana allows high power rifle on all private lands. Straight wall, shotgun and muzzleloader on public. After hunting public for so many years I agree. Some real winners out there.

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