Jump to content
SASS Wire Forum

Removing roll pins


German Jim
 Share

Recommended Posts

Having the proper sized punch, when removing roll pins from a firearm, do you:

1.  remove from the right?

2. remove from the left?

3. does it matter at all?

4. does it matter the type (rifle, pistol, or shotgun)?

5. does it matter if the pin is solid or hollow?

6. just do it the same on all your firearms?

7. does it matter on the firearm manufacturer?

 

Oops.  I forgot Top to Bottom such as on a bolt

 

 

Thanks

 

 

Edited by German Jim
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If it is a true roll pin (hollow spring steel) the direction does not matter. If it is a solid steel pin then it matters. On firearms roll pins need to be removed with the correct punches if you don't want to mar the surface.

 

When it comes to solid pins the make and model matters. For removal, I have seen some that have to be driven left to Right. I have also see some that have to be driver right to left.

 

The only consistent direction across all makes and models are dovetail sights. They are always removed driving left to right.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A roll pin is never solid.  It's always a rolled piece of springy sheet stock.   You can see the hole in each end of the pin (unless it has been severely mangled).  It's the springy nature of the pin trying to expand in diameter which helps retain it in it's hole without some other locking mechanism - like peening base metal over the end of the pin, staking, interference fit, riveting the end, adding a second cross pin to hold the pin, etc).  Best to use roll pin punch that best fits the roll pin you are working on.   Using a solid punch can (under severe circumstances) smash the wall of the roll pin and perhaps lock it in place.

 

If you have a solid pin and can't see which end was driven in with a punch, then usually it's been placed in a regular drilled (straight wall) hole, and thus can be tapped out in either direction.  If you do see some punch marks, first attempt ought to be to drive it out from the unmarked end.  In one way, out by backing the pin out (the other way)

 

A "directional" solid pin is very unusual, in my experience.  Just because it's expensive to make either a tapered hole or a tapered pin.

 

good luck, GJ

Edited by Garrison Joe, SASS #60708
Link to comment
Share on other sites

53 minutes ago, Garrison Joe, SASS #60708 said:

A "directional" solid pin is very unusual, in my experience.  Just because it's expensive to make either a tapered hole or a tapered pin.

 

Seen directional pins in a couple of shotgun receivers. Pin was not tapered but had a slightly enlarged head Only a  couple thousandths but enough to make it directional. Also have seen pins knurled on one end. Again only a couple thousandths larger than the other end.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

As noted by definition a "roll" is not solid.  In the U.S. they are rolled out of a single layer of steel and have a gap running down the length of the pin.  In Europe they are often rolled and have multiple layers with no gap.  A roll pin punch has a dimple on the tip to center the punch on the pin.

 

DSC_0006.thumb.jpeg.49825c01aadd370d00e3f3ce073534d2.jpeg

 

DSC_0004.thumb.jpeg.53be9e742b3050fe1507028d9ae10c25.jpeg

 

DSC_0002.thumb.jpeg.06b45262c65394c2c438491f8d68c060.jpeg

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would call that convex area on the drive end on a roll pin punch a button.   Dimple would imply it's concave... But that is really pickin' nits!  ;)

  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
On 4/30/2022 at 3:24 PM, Larsen E. Pettifogger, SASS #32933 said:

As noted by definition a "roll" is not solid.  In the U.S. they are rolled out of a single layer of steel and have a gap running down the length of the pin.  In Europe they are often rolled and have multiple layers with no gap.  A roll pin punch has a dimple on the tip to center the punch on the pin.

 

DSC_0006.thumb.jpeg.49825c01aadd370d00e3f3ce073534d2.jpeg

 

DSC_0004.thumb.jpeg.53be9e742b3050fe1507028d9ae10c25.jpeg

 

DSC_0002.thumb.jpeg.06b45262c65394c2c438491f8d68c060.jpeg

There are roll pin starter punches that take a lot of frustration out of installing roll pins.  They are almost a necessity when building AR's.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.