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Refinish vs Original Finish


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When we moved from Central Florida to SE Florida I had to put almost all our stuff into storage.

It was not an ideal situation.

Roof leaked, flooding occured. Tears were shed. That was all before I even told Mrs Waimea.

Several long guns were damaged as their stocks sat in water for a day or more.

El Q Jones worked some miracles on an heirloom drilling that had been damaged. I MEAN MIRACLES.

 

So the question is not a matter of finding some who can but should I?

 

The gun in question is a .30-40 Krag.

It has an issue stamp that would probably be lost. The gun is in fair condition at best but all original.

Early serial number 17xxx.

 

Opinions ?

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This may or may Not help, Pard but it's worth a try.

Get a 20 lb sack of rice and a box your stock will fit in. Pour a layer or rice in the box place the stock in and cover the stock with the rice let set for a few weeks or more. The rice will draw the moisture out of the wood. I know it sounds crazy but it's worth a try and relatively inexpensive. 

Good Luck Pard!

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An early US Military Krag in fair condition (if using NRA grading) would probably be valued about $1400-$1600.   Restoring the stock would remove some of that value.   I would restore only if I intended to use the gun as a shooter with some regularity.    Really depends upon what damage has occurred.  

 

Collector's value has probably already been lost.   You gun is probably not in fair condition at this point, with water damage.  It's not all that good a candidate for sporterizing - as it's so old most folks don't consider it's action or chambering to be "modern" enough.

 

Getting another military stock in good condition is VERY hard for Krags.

 

This is one of those situations where it is hard to make an easy call.   It's at best a shooter for sure now, but you probably would not want to shoot it in it's present condition, out of "shooter's pride".    And you haven't said if it has family sentimental value - which would be the only reason I would see for a "restoration".

 

At the end of the discussion, it's your money.  You probably would not be pouring lots of money into it.  You won't be making a better shooter of it by doing the stock refinish/repair.   So many details are missing that might sway you one way or another, it really is Your Choice at this level of knowledge of gun, history and situation.

 

Good luck, GJ

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The issue stamp is quite likely worth more than the rifle.  There are restorers that specialize in stamps it might be worthwhile to inquire.  I think Joe might be a little high on value but crazy things are happening in values today.  I personally like to put things right if I can.  So sending the stock out to a professional then stabilizing the metal myself with the eye toward later restoration certainly would be a thought in my mind.   

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56 minutes ago, twelve mile REB said:

The issue stamp is quite likely worth more than the rifle.  There are restorers that specialize in stamps it might be worthwhile to inquire.  I think Joe might be a little high on value but crazy things are happening in values today.  I personally like to put things right if I can.  So sending the stock out to a professional then stabilizing the metal myself with the eye toward later restoration certainly would be a thought in my mind.   

Issue stamp is there but very faint.

My Uncle just up and gave it to me in 1998.

He's asked me several times of I shot it. He thought it was a .30-06.

 

The flood was almost 5 years ago. The stock puffed up some but after some time in the house with the ac on it eventually went back to pretty normal. It did leave a water stain.

 

 

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How much of the stock, 1" or half way up?

While moisture can be removed from the wood there is no doubt the wood is stained. If the rifle was in fair condition it is now worth less.

I'd approach it as if your rifle was laying next to a refinished stock rifle and they were the same price which would you buy? Everything else being the same!

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3 hours ago, irish ike, SASS #43615 said:

How much of the stock, 1" or half way up?

While moisture can be removed from the wood there is no doubt the wood is stained. If the rifle was in fair condition it is now worth less.

I'd approach it as if your rifle was laying next to a refinished stock rifle and they were the same price which would you buy? Everything else being the same!

 

I used to really care about patina on an antique object but I have now gone the other way. 

I just didn't want to take a really collectable gun and completely ruin it's value.

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That stock was originally finished with hot linseed oil, I think it was boiling when they put the wood in.  I would not use hot oil, but linseed oil rubbed into the wood might refurbish the stock and eliminate the water mark. I would not use sand paper or any other abrasive on it at this point.  A professional might be able to restore it without altering the value.

 

Duffield

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15 hours ago, Duffield, SASS #23454 said:

That stock was originally finished with hot linseed oil, I think it was boiling when they put the wood in.  I would not use hot oil, but linseed oil rubbed into the wood might refurbish the stock and eliminate the water mark. I would not use sand paper or any other abrasive on it at this point.  A professional might be able to restore it without altering the value.

 

Duffield

Thanks, Duffield.

I will not touch it myself if I decide to do this thing.

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