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Alpo

Jewish question

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sepharim

 

From context in the story, it is some type of religious book.

 

Doing a search, and all that turns up is seraphim, which is a type of angel, and is a completely different word.

 

Stupid search engines.

 

Anyone know?

 

This is a frustrating book. It's a good story, but one of the characters is an extremely religious Jewish woman, and she keeps throwing out Hebrew and Yiddish words and phrases. Seems like I can't go a page without having to go look up something she said.

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>“What’ve you got in the box?” asked Sammy.
“These are some Jewish books and articles that my ex-wife’s grandfather brought over from Europe. When he died, no one in the family wanted them, so I took ’em. I’ve been meaning to take them to the yeshiva.”
Decker ripped open the sealed top and held up a leather-bound book with pages edged in gilt.
“Does this mean anything to you?” he asked.
“Wait a minute,” Rina said. “My hands are dirty.”
She and the boys washed their hands, and Decker took the carton of books into the living room.
Jake picked up the book that Decker had been holding. “That’s a machzor,” he said.
“A what?”
Sammy took it and opened it carefully. “It’s a prayer book for the New Year. This side is Hebrew, but I don’t know what language this is.”
He handed the book to Rina.
“It’s German,” she said. “Was her grandfather from Germany?”
“I don’t know,” said Decker.
Look at all these beautiful sepharim,” Rina said, pulling out another volume. It was bound in dark green leather, the cover lettering stenciled in gold. She looked at the date of publication — 1798.
“A lot of sepharim were destroyed during World War Two. These may be very valuable, Peter.”

“Look at this, Eema,” said Sammy, holding up an elaborately filigreed, foot-long scroll case.
“Yeah, what is that?” Decker asked. “See, you pull this tab over here, and the text comes out of this slit. It’s illustrated with all this beautiful artwork—”
“This is unbelievable!” Rina said, pulling on the tab gingerly.
“Megillas Esther,” Sammy said.<

 

 

That doesn't sound like people - it sounds like books.

 

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2 hours ago, Pat Riot, SASS #13748 said:

Maybe this will help. 
The word appears to be the plural of “Seraph”.

 

https://www.biblestudytools.com/dictionary/seraphim/

 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seraph

That's my problem, Pat.

 

I'm looking for seP Har, and the search engines give me seR Aph. Same letters, but put together differently.

 

Search engines don't believe I can spell.  Auto correct.

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Quote
Sephar [N] [E] [H]

(a numbering ). It is written after the enumeration of the sons of Joktan, "And their dwelling was from Mesha as thou goest unto Sephar a mount of the east." ( Genesis 10:30 ) The Joktanites occupied the southwestern portion of the peninsula of Arabia. The undoubted identifications of Arabian places and tribes with their Joktanite originals are included within these limits, and point to Sephar, on the shore of the Indian Ocean, as the eastern boundary. The ancient seaport town called Zafar represents the biblical site or district.

 

https://www.biblegateway.com/resources/encyclopedia-of-the-bible/Sephar

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2 hours ago, Alpo said:

That's my problem, Pat.

 

I'm looking for seP Har, and the search engines give me seR Aph. Same letters, but put together differently.

 

Search engines don't believe I can spell.  Auto correct.

Oh crap! I misread it it. I thought you said Seraphim. :blink:

 

 

I can't even spell "crap' right...

 

Edited by Pat Riot, SASS #13748
DUH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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So I am relying on very old memories to answer this question.

 

Sepharia translates as people of the book.  Sephariam therefore would be books or more accurately texts of the Old Testament or of Talmudic teachings.

 

 

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Thank you. I was hoping you or Nubbins would jump in.

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I'm sorry I didn't have a clever insult for you.  I know I haven't done so in some time and that you must miss that.  Put some Tupelo honey on a biscuit and wash it down with some Jack Daniels on my behalf sometime.

 

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12 minutes ago, J. Mark Flint #31954 LIFE said:

Jack Daniels

The Tyrconnell. You introduced me to that, saying goodbye to Gunny.

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1 hour ago, J. Mark Flint #31954 LIFE said:

Tupelo honey

 

I had to look that up.   I was expecting to see it as an euphemism for molasses.  Boy, was I wrong!

 

Sounds like nectar of the gods.

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Yes Scotch for goodbyes, Jack for memories of friends that are still above ground but not present.

 

Alpo introduced me to Tupelo Honey at Mississippi Fandango back in the stone age.  Good stuff.

 

 

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20 minutes ago, Subdeacon Joe said:

Sounds like nectar of the gods.

It is. And it doesn't sugar.

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This is not a Jewish question. It is a question about Judaism.

A Jewish question would be. “You should meet my son the doctor. Why don’t you come over for supper?” ;)

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I hear Tupelo Honey makes damn good moonshine, too.

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4 hours ago, Utah Bob #35998 said:

This is not a Jewish question. It is a question about Judaism.

A Jewish question would be. “You should meet my son the doctor. Why don’t you come over for supper?” ;)

 

I have to say that my first thought on seeing the subject line was, "Why is he asking something about "Zur Judenfrange?"

 

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17 hours ago, Subdeacon Joe said:

 

I have to say that my first thought on seeing the subject line was, "Why is he asking something about "Zur Judenfrange?"

 

;)

86F5BE04-ED71-4E31-B611-6731845765C8.jpeg

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21 hours ago, J. Mark Flint #31954 LIFE said:

Frailing or drop thumb?

 

Mostly frailing, just now getting used to a little drop thumb and two finger lead.

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Is playing banjo a requirement for making moonshine?

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45 minutes ago, Alpo said:

Is playing banjo a requirement for making moonshine?

 

No

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On 10/18/2019 at 3:39 PM, Alpo said:

Is playing banjo a requirement for making moonshine?

Just the opposite.  Moonshine is a requirement for playing banjo.

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36 minutes ago, Marshal Hangtree said:

Just the opposite.  Moonshine is a requirement for playing banjo.

Beat me to it. :lol:

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