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Need Help Identifying Marlin Action Job


Rootin Tootin

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I have a Marlin 38 spec, Cowboy Comp, CC receiver, 20 inch octagon with an action job. The bottom of the bolt has a number scratched in it. Either 419 or 719. Hard to tell and under the hammer there is a "Y". Can someone tell me who did it............The carrier looks beefier than stock carrier.

 

Any idea who did it???? RT .............Thanks

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I have a new 94 Marlin with 3 numbers Scratched ( last 3 numbers of serial #) on the bottom of the bolt...

 

I thought the term SCRACHED on the bottom of the bolt to be a great description of just how it was done...

It looked very crudely done ...

 

 

 

Jabez Cowboy

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Checked the serial number at it is the last three.......You were all correct..Thanks.....What about the "Y" on the cross bolt housing under the hammer??? I'm a 73 guy....RT

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If you don't value my opinion (HA HA) then how about these facts....All internals have all been polished, lighter hammer spring, and the carrier looks heavier than some marlins I've seen in the past. Also told that it had an action job but didn't know by who???

 

I realize this can also be done by any savy individual but just wanted to check if it was a well known smith that left his mark Like Spur, or just a darn good cowboy, cause it's really fast and easy to run like the Spur Marlin I had years ago..I'm a 73 guy now....

 

Regards..............RT

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If you don't value my opinion (HA HA) then how about these facts....All internals have all been polished, lighter hammer spring, and the carrier looks heavier than some marlins I've seen in the past. Also told that it had an action job but didn't know by who???

 

I realize this can also be done by any savy individual but just wanted to check if it was a well known smith that left his mark Like Spur, or just a darn good cowboy, cause it's really fast and easy to run like the Spur Marlin I had years ago..I'm a 73 guy now....

 

Regards..............RT

I wasn't challenging your opinion. You list a lot of work done on it after leaving the factory. Maybe how something was done would point to a specific person.

 

Many years ago I worked on S&W wheel guns. There were two schools of though on making the hammer spring lighter; one would nerrow the spring's width, the other would thin down the thickness. Someone with experience could tell who did it or had copied one or the others method.

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Warden, no offense taken.......That's why the HA HA..........I listed all the key elements I could find thinking someone might recognize the stuff but i guess what I listed is common to all Marlins and designates serial numbers and Builders.

 

I did remember that Spur always initialed his work along with a number on the bolt. Guess the action job work on this Marlin can't be attributed to any specific cowboy gun smith....

 

Guess I'll just have to be satisfied with the fact that it was done and runs really fast.......Thanks to all for your inputs

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Process of elimination might help..... it ain't mine.

 

As for the 'Y', maybe it stands for:

 

"Y did this one get out of the factory so smooth and mine didn't"..... :lol::lol::lol:

 

EDIT: years back when I first started in SASS, there seemed to be an endless number of really good Marlin smiths all over the country. Of course, 10 years ago, it was also easy to get Marlin parts to help make them smoother. We can still get springs and 1-piece firing pins, but factory Ejectors and Extractors are not so easy to get nowdays.

 

I have seen a couple Marlins pass thru my hands with a letter scratched on the bolt after the last 3 or 4 digits of the serial number. But I don't recall what it means or who put it there.

 

I will go on the Marlin owners forum and ask. And post the reply here ASAP.

 

 

..........Widder

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is the carrier an old style or new style,,,,, spur wud take an old one and work his magic on it,, at least thas my understanding and what my two spurs look like....

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I know it's NOT a signed Spur gun.....I checked the bolt and I'm also certain it's not a Carty/Spur cause I shoot with Carty from time to time....It has a cross bolt safety so it's not real old. Guess I'll just call it the ghost gunsmith action job that's quicker than a scalded dog on a hot plate......HA HA

 

Thanks to all! RT

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While I don't mark any guns I work on, I do keep records of serial numbers listed and filed by action type...

 

So I can check if I did the work in question on any given gun ...

 

 

Jabez Cowboy

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The answers I received on the Marlin owners forum indicated that letters were used as suffixes to serial numbers indicating year of manufacture.

 

There was no mention of any lettering 'under the hammer' or indication of WHO might have used the 'Y' as their mark.

 

Glad you got a real good Marlin.

 

 

..........Widder

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