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Colt Bowden ?


Kansas City Jack #9243

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Bowden Colt: A Colt revolver customized by early 20th Century gunsmith Hiram Bowden. Bowden's shop was in Reno Nevada from about 1887 until 1916. He specialized in modifying the Colt Single Action Army by cutting the front of the trigger guard away, cutting the barrel down, removing the ejector mechanism, and tuning the action. Several Old West gunman are thought to have used revolvers modified by Bowden, including Jose Chavez y Baca and Charles Baker. In 1916 Bowden was drafted into the Army and he was later killed in the Meuse Argonne offensive of 1918.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nahhhhhhhhhhhhh.

 

I made that all up.

 

I have never heard of it.

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I made that all up.

 

I have never heard of it.

 

That was obvious - He would have been way too old to have been drafted in 1916. It was his son, Beauregard (known as BeauBow), who was drafted in 1916.

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Bowden Colt: A Colt revolver customized by early 20th Century gunsmith Hiram Bowden. Bowden's shop was in Reno Nevada from about 1887 until 1916. He specialized in modifying the Colt Single Action Army by cutting the front of the trigger guard away, cutting the barrel down, removing the ejector mechanism, and tuning the action. Several Old West gunman are thought to have used revolvers modified by Bowden, including Jose Chavez y Baca and Charles Baker. In 1916 Bowden was drafted into the Army and he was later killed in the Meuse Argonne offensive of 1918.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nahhhhhhhhhhhhh.

 

I made that all up.

 

I have never heard of it.

 

 

Aw! an I like that!

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Guest Tennessee Stud, SASS# 43634 Life

Sounds made-up to me, like the ".32 Marley" that is in all the Nero Wolfe novels.

 

 

That's not made up... here's the lowdown...

 

.32 Marley: A Winchester rifle customized in the mid-70's by gunsmith Bob Marley. Marley's shop was located in Jamaica from about 1970 until 1981. He specialized in modifying the Winchester rifle by adding a bong to the stock and permeatin' the barrel with profuse amounts of Hemp Smoke... thereby makin' them feel more comfortable while restin' on a fella's cheekbone close to his nasal passages... and causin' the modified rifles to... in his own words... "they be jammin', man". Several L.A. spaceheads are thought to have used rifles modified by Marley, includin' Jerry Moonbeam Brown. In 1981, Marley accidentally was kilt whilst suckin' on and testin' the jammin' capabilities of his rifle... and pullin' on the trigger-lighter. After his death... Marley was drafted into the Jamaican Army... and has served ever since so's his fella Jamaicans can draw his ever-important DFAS check.

 

~~~~~~~

 

With all due respect to Driftwood Pecker.... hehehehe

 

(Thanks... Driftwood... you made me laugh...)

 

ts

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With all due respect there is a Bowen Colt. Hamilton Bowen converts mainly Ruger SA's but some Colts. They are recognized as some of the finest examples of gunsmithing single actions, primarily for hunting.

 

Here is a link to his website:

 

Bowen

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Well written piece of historical fiction Driftwood. Could open up a whole new career for ya.

 

A lot of the old fiction writers used to come up with imaginary products like these to avoid getting sued. There was a time when companies were very jealous and protective of their product lines, and took a dim view of any unauthorized use. Especially if it appeared to cast them in a bad light.

 

Then the rules changed, and the concept of "common nomenclature and usage" took over. Xerox and Kleenex are two examples - even though they're copyrighted, they're now the common terms for photocopying and tissue even if the machine and the nose-blow paper are made by different companies.

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With all due respect there is a Bowen Colt. Hamilton Bowen converts mainly Ruger SA's but some Colts. They are recognized as some of the finest examples of gunsmithing single actions, primarily for hunting.

 

Yeah, but the original poster asked about a Bowden Colt, not a Bowen Colt.

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All those in favor of me giving Johnson a dope slap on Sunday when I see him on Sunday say Aye.

 

Wait, wait....yer gonna slap someone's johnson? What? :wacko:

 

Geez, on another thread Okie is trying to get someone into his pants, and now yer talkin' about slappin' someones johnson. :unsure:

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A dope slap Joe, a dope slap. Does however remind me of the "johnson" shoot we had up here once in his honor. Everyone became a Johnson for a day and some of the resulting short term aliases were pretty good. IE Iron Johnson, Piney Johnson, Wild Johnson, Flyrod Johnson, Iron Horse Johnson, Toledo Johnson, Saguaro Johnson etc etc etc.

 

Maybe I wont give him a dope slap, maybe I'll just refuse to run lines from Butch and Sundance with him.

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Iron Pony - Yes please dope slap Driftwood for me. When I read his post I believed it, glad I read on. I am sorry about the misspell, but spell check didn't work for me.

 

The pistol was in a Clive Cussler novel "The Navigator" and he is usually good with details.

 

Have a great shoot, and keep them on the metal.

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I was reading a novel and the hero had a Colt SAA Bowden or Bowdon in .45 cal.

 

I have never heard of a Colt Bowden what is it and when was it made?

 

 

Driftwood, since the original poster was unsure of the spelling, i.e. Bowden or Bowdon, I thought that he may actually mean Bowen. If he did, he deserved an answer. If he was reading a 19th century novel, then your answer is as good as any.

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