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I want to load .45 Schofield


German Jim

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I'm interested in loading some .45 Schofields with Black Powder to shoot in my Ruger and my Uberti .45s. I'd like to use the 250gr bullets that I use for my .45 Colt black powder loads. Is 250gr to heavy a bullet? I'd like to use just one bullet for everything.

 

One other question. What was the orignial .45 Schofield load that the Army used back then?

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Not that they're any kind of expert, but Wilkapedia's reference to the 45 Schofield lists three different bullet weights of 200, 230, and 250 grains at their site http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.45_Schofield I couldn't find a cartridge specific reference to the Schofield, but maybe you will be able to? Smithy.

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Original Schofield cartridge was loaded with 28 grains black powder and a 230 grain bullet.

A 250 grain bullet is not too much bullet.

--Dawg

 

From: http://www.sam-hane.com/sass/schofield/history.htm

 

The .45 S&W round was shorter than the .45 Colt, and had a slightly larger rim to aid in the ejection process. It had a 230 grn. lead bullet, powered by 28-29 grns. of black powder, while the original .45 Colt round had a 250 grn lead bullet powered by 40 grns. of black powder. (As a note, the Army later down-loaded their .45 Colt rounds to 30 grns of black powder with card fillers to make them more controllable)

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Howdy

 

For what it's worth, I always load 45 Schofield with 200 grain J/P 45-200. Combined with the lesser powder charge than the 45 Colt, it makes a very mild shooting load.

 

Be forwarned though. Sometimes there is a problem chambering 45 Schofields in Rugers. The larger rim of the Schofiled round can sometimes interfere with the boss of metal under the ratchet teeth. Not a problem with Colts or clones because their design of the rear of the cylinder leaves more clearance. But my Rugers each have one chamber that will not allow a Schofield round to chamber all the way without a fight. I used to think it would only take about five minutes with a file to correct this, turned out it took the entire lunch break at a match last year when one of my Colts broke a spring.

 

Some folks have no problem chambering Schofileds in Rugers, but the clearance is so close that sometimes there is a problem.

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My 'original' Vaqueros load the .45 Schofield cartridges perfectly in the cylinders with both the SS and blued versions - no issues at all. They also feed great in my Marlin Cowboy Limited and 1860 Henry (Uberti)

 

It really is a great round to shoot...

 

Since I am starting to shoot gunfighter (with BP) I might start to consider using this round in my revolvers - still have some that were loaded 15 years ago :lol:

 

GG ~ :FlagAm:

 

 

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Two Bits, your load is here ... http://www.goexpowder.com/images/LoadCharts/Cartridge-Pistol-Revolvers.pdf

 

For all original gunpowder shooters, please bookmark this site for future references or to aid those that are new to shooting BP and don't have a clue what the reloading data should be, including nearly every caliber that was ever made. It is the most comprehensive loading data for black powder in existence -

http://www.goexpowder.com/load-chart.html

 

Background: In the early 1970's Hodgdon for a few short years imported black powder from Nobel Industries that was made in Great Britain and Hodgdon got the loading data from Nobel at that time. Nobel (ICI) bought out Curtis's and Harvey (C&H)in the late 1960's and continued to produce gunpowder at the C&H facility in Ardeer, Scotland. I am of the opinion that these comprehensive loading data tables are a product of Curtis's and Harvey when they were still in business and made the best black powder in the world!

 

Here's a picture of a can of powder that Hodgdon used to sell ... http://i222.photobucket.com/albums/dd220/Meadowmucker/Misc/HodgdonBP.jpg

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+1 on the post by John Boy. The 200 gr bullet is a better choice for the Schofield round if you are shooting SASS matches. The 200 gr gives less recoil and better recovery time. The 28 gr load will give you plenty of BOOM and Smoke along with Fire.

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For all original gunpowder shooters, please bookmark this site for future references or to aid those that are new to shooting BP and don't have a clue what the reloading data should be, including nearly every caliber that was ever made. It is the most comprehensive loading data for black powder in existence -

http://www.goexpowde...load-chart.html

 

Howdy John Boy

 

So just how do you stuff 42 grains of Goex FFg into the 45 Colt with modern solid head brass under a 247 grain bullet? Or 34 grains of FFFg under a 250 grain bullet in a Schofield? Must be some mighty bodacious compression. And why does the data list two completely different charges for 45 Schofield and 45 S&W with the same weight bullet.

 

Thanks for the link, but I think I will stick to my old 1/16" - 1/8" of compression. Has worked pretty well for me so far.

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Howdy

 

For what it's worth, I always load 45 Schofield with 200 grain J/P 45-200. Combined with the lesser powder charge than the 45 Colt, it makes a very mild shooting load.

 

Be forwarned though. Sometimes there is a problem chambering 45 Schofields in Rugers. The larger rim of the Schofiled round can sometimes interfere with the boss of metal under the ratchet teeth. Not a problem with Colts or clones because their design of the rear of the cylinder leaves more clearance. But my Rugers each have one chamber that will not allow a Schofield round to chamber all the way without a fight. I used to think it would only take about five minutes with a file to correct this, turned out it took the entire lunch break at a match last year when one of my Colts broke a spring.

 

Some folks have no problem chambering Schofileds in Rugers, but the clearance is so close that sometimes there is a problem.

 

Thanks Driftwood. I borrowed some .45 Schofields from a pard and loaded them in each chamber of each cylinder of my Ruger and Uberti. They dropped in just fine. I read one of your posts stating that you had a chamber in one of the cylinders that would not load a .45 Schofield. That's why I wanted to try it first before doing this post. I always get good info from you and the others here on the wire.

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Thanks Driftwood. I borrowed some .45 Schofields from a pard and loaded them in each cylinder of my Ruger and Uberti. They dropped in just fine. I read one of your posts stating that you had a cylinder that would not load a .45 Schofield. That's why I wanted to try it first before doing this post. I always get good info from you and the others here on the wire.

 

;)

 

GG ~ :FlagAm:

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Howdy John Boy

 

So just how do you stuff 42 grains of Goex FFg into the 45 Colt with modern solid head brass under a 247 grain bullet? Or 34 grains of FFFg under a 250 grain bullet in a Schofield? Must be some mighty bodacious compression. And why does the data list two completely different charges for 45 Schofield and 45 S&W with the same weight bullet.

 

Thanks for the link, but I think I will stick to my old 1/16" - 1/8" of compression. Has worked pretty well for me so far.

 

Plenty fine for me too pard..

 

must be some old school 'back in the old day balloon head brass' loads..

 

GG ~ :FlagAm:

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I think you would be pleased loading the new 45 Cowboy case full any kind of powder with the bullet of your choice. These small cases have the same case volume as the 44Russian and the 45 acp. I normally shoot the 44Russian with a case full of 777 when shooting black powder. Great round. No fillers required. Reasonable recoil.

 

Just an alternate if the schofield cases don't work out. Another advantage is that it is easy to tell the difference in this small case and a full length 45 colt, if that is what you are using in your rifle. The longer schofield is a little more difficult to discern.

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Driftwood, I didn't write the music. I just read it!

And I agree whole hardily that folks today don't shoot balloon head cases unless their great Aunt died and left them more coins than they know what to do with.

 

And yes, black powder charges can be reduced for any caliber to allow one to use a nominal compression of their choosing in brass made today. Original gunpowder is a weak powder, not like nitro based powders - Right?

 

And I still am 100% firmly convinced that the loading data tables on the Goex website are the Best There Are. If anyone, all takers, can show me better ones ... Bring It On!

Okie Dokie?

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Driftwood, I didn't write the music. I just read it!

And I agree whole hardily that folks today don't shoot balloon head cases unless their great Aunt died and left them more coins than they know what to do with.

 

And yes, black powder charges can be reduced for any caliber to allow one to use a nominal compression of their choosing in brass made today. Original gunpowder is a weak powder, not like nitro based powders - Right?

 

And I still am 100% firmly convinced that the loading data tables on the Goex website are the Best There Are. If anyone, all takers, can show me better ones ... Bring It On!

Okie Dokie?

 

 

Alot of folks on this issue like the Starline brass ( I do :D ) so the loads may/or...may not be in reference to that standard mentioned in the Goex link, probably not...maybe??...

 

(boy, do I feel like a politician.. :0)

 

:D

 

GG ~ :FlagAm:

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