Jump to content

Quigley vs Hartford


Bisley Joe

Recommended Posts

45 minutes ago, Bisley Joe said:

Regarding recoil pads adding length of pull..,

What about have the stock shortened let’s say an inch. Then have a removable section of 1 inch. This section can be used if needed when no recoil pad is available. But when it is, remove it and thus the LOP  remains the same.

 

Serves no purpose.

Wearing a hvy jacket changes LOP.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

41 minutes ago, The Original Lumpy Gritz said:

Serves no purpose.

Wearing a hvy jacket changes LOP.

So what are best ways to reduce felt recoil?

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Bisley Joe said:

So what are best ways to reduce felt recoil?

 

1. Heavier barrel on the gun

2. Lower the powder charge

3. lower the weight of the bullet

4. Softer recoil pad

5. Adding a weight in the butt.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, The Original Lumpy Gritz said:

Less cartridge.....

 

23309324-6FF8-4607-90AC-CBF1DD6E2A69.jpeg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

“Shooters friend recoil pad”, best thump reducer I have ever used.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have two Shilohs. A Hartford in 45-110 and a Montana Roughrider in 38-55.  I’ll try to hit the high points of your questions…

 

Shiloh’s Quigley is a gussied up Hartford. If you don’t want the extras, don’t pay for them.

 

My 45-110 is a 34” heavy barrel.  It absorbs recoil to the point of it being a solid push and quite manageable.  I still wish it were 30” to make it easier for offhand shooting.

 

The buckhorn rear and blade front sights are near useless for my 56 year old eyes and anything beyond 100 yards.  Regardless of what you choose, I recommend a vernier rear sight and a peep front. The MVA 113 or Lyman 17a are good choices for the front. I mounted an MVA #130 rear sight and it gets me to 300 yards with room to spare.  I don’t have further distances than that.  
 

The biggest thing I’d do differently would be to have both calibers in a Montana Roughrider as it has a pistol grip in its stock.  My right hand and wrist are getting stiff and don’t like the Hartford’s straight stock.  The pistol grip makes everything more manageable. 
 

Buy the prettiest wood you can afford.  It adds nothing to performance but sure looks nice.

 

And get ready for folks asking questions when you’re at the range. It’s hard to not attract attention when touching off the 45-110.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I really prefer the look of the military stock, but y’all have said it can be brutal-and I don’t doubt it.

Does the Shooters Friend Recoil Pad make the military stock manageable?

Maybe the military stock with no patch box and with a recoil reducer inside as well?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

All that said. I have this unfired 45-110 Shiloh Quigley style with accessories and MVA sights that I'm going to have to turn loose of.

461A65A9-8D0C-4DF9-A254-0FF700027ADD.jpeg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 minutes ago, stepnmud#33546 said:

All that said. I have this unfired 45-110 Shiloh Quigley style with accessories and MVA sights that I'm going to have to turn loose of.

461A65A9-8D0C-4DF9-A254-0FF700027ADD.jpeg

PMd you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, The Original Lumpy Gritz said:

It doesn't stay on the military stock be cause the stock is so narrow. 

You need to wrap the pad with HD rubber bands.

 

Yep!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 hours ago, The Original Lumpy Gritz said:

It doesn't stay on the military stock be cause the stock is so narrow. 

You need to wrap the pad with HD rubber bands.

 

Thanks again.

I plan on making my own custom pad from leather and some hi tech material. Will experiment for placing on stock but more interested in one that straps onto the body.

 

I have heard different accounts: some saying the recoil is stout but manageable, some saying it is utterly brutal ( with a picture of bruises).

I think everyone is different but certainly am going to lean more towards your warnings.

 

Seems like two things are important aside from gun weight and cartridge: a cushion to dampen the recoil, and a way to distribute the force over a larger area.

I imagine getting the stock to take and maintain a good position is crucial-and challenging-the thicker the pad.

 

I’m hoping black powder will lessen the punishment a bit, as that’s all I am interested shooting it with.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another couple of considerations not mentioned: 1 -  if you ever consider NRA BPCRS matches your rifle weight is limited to 12lbs 3 ozs.  My Long Range Express in 40-90BN with a 30" bbl comes in one oz under max.   When I ordered my rifle the plan was for SASS long range and hunting.  But after seeing BPCRS I changed the wood to XXfancy and cut the bbl to 30" to make weight.   Basically, I can't add anything to the rifle help manage recoil, so I simply have a shotgun buttplate.  2 -,you mentioned paper-patch bullets.  They work best in a slightly longer chamber throat to accept the paper patch.  Trying to paper patch bullets in a short grease groove chamber will be frustrating.  3 - know what weight bullet & velocity you want so you can optimize the rifling twist rate.  More to discuss with Kirk or Lucinda.

 

Like was said earlier, you will be pestered as soon as you set up & touch off a few rounds, especially at a public range.  Even at our private gun club, if there's anyone on any of the rifle ranges, they'll usually stop by and ask questions, hoping to get an invite to shoot it!  Don't offer that on a public range, they'll soon be lined up to help dispose of your ammo!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you decide to pursue a new Sharps and don’t mind the wait, fine just get comfortable and wait. If your like me and want to start shooting your sharps yesterday contact Bill Goodman he is a dealer of this type of rifle and may have what you want (used)   In his shop. Just Google Bill Goodman Sharps Rifles, I have bought from him as has guys on this forum, very reputable and honest man.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, The Original Lumpy Gritz said:

OP, I urge you to call Shiloh Sharps and speak with either Kirk or Lucinda(2 of the owners). Listen hard to what they say.

Also ask how long the build will take. 2-3 years is common.

I’ll do that.

Thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

26 minutes ago, Griff said:

Another couple of considerations not mentioned: 1 -  if you ever consider NRA BPCRS matches your rifle weight is limited to 12lbs 3 ozs.  My Long Range Express in 40-90BN with a 30" bbl comes in one oz under max.   When I ordered my rifle the plan was for SASS long range and hunting.  But after seeing BPCRS I changed the wood to XXfancy and cut the bbl to 30" to make weight.   Basically, I can't add anything to the rifle help manage recoil, so I simply have a shotgun buttplate.  2 -,you mentioned paper-patch bullets.  They work best in a slightly longer chamber throat to accept the paper patch.  Trying to paper patch bullets in a short grease groove chamber will be frustrating.  3 - know what weight bullet & velocity you want so you can optimize the rifling twist rate.  More to discuss with Kirk or Lucinda.

 

Like was said earlier, you will be pestered as soon as you set up & touch off a few rounds, especially at a public range.  Even at our private gun club, if there's anyone on any of the rifle ranges, they'll usually stop by and ask questions, hoping to get an invite to shoot it!  Don't offer that on a public range, they'll soon be lined up to help dispose of your ammo!

Thanks.

Ill keep that in mind.

My main idea is a recoil pad on the body, not so much the rifle.

Thanks for the public range warning!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 minutes ago, Silver Creek Jack said:

If you decide to pursue a new Sharps and don’t mind the wait, fine just get comfortable and wait. If your like me and want to start shooting your sharps yesterday contact Bill Goodman he is a dealer of this type of rifle and may have what you want (used)   In his shop. Just Google Bill Goodman Sharps Rifles, I have bought from him as has guys on this forum, very reputable and honest man.

Thank you!

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, The Original Lumpy Gritz said:

OP, I urge you to call Shiloh Sharps and speak with either Kirk or Lucinda(2 of the owners). Listen hard to what they say.

Also ask how long the build will take. 2-3 years is common.

 

6 hours ago, Silver Creek Jack said:

If you decide to pursue a new Sharps and don’t mind the wait, fine just get comfortable and wait. If your like me and want to start shooting your sharps yesterday contact Bill Goodman he is a dealer of this type of rifle and may have what you want (used)   In his shop. Just Google Bill Goodman Sharps Rifles, I have bought from him as has guys on this forum, very reputable and honest man.

When you call Shiloh, ask what they have in inventory... they almost always have a few rifles that are unsold... they may not be exactly what you're looking for, but... you won't know if you don't ask.  A friend of mine wanted a plain "business rifle" and they had one when he called, so he drove out to Big Timber from Seattle the next day.  The last time I stopped in they had 7 or 8 hanging on the wall for immediate delivery.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 minutes ago, Griff said:

 

When you call Shiloh, ask what they have in inventory... they almost always have a few rifles that are unsold... they may not be exactly what you're looking for, but... you won't know if you don't ask.  A friend of mine wanted a plain "business rifle" and they had one when he called, so he drove out to Big Timber from Seattle the next day.  The last time I stopped in they had 7 or 8 hanging on the wall for immediate delivery.  

The in stock rifles are listed on their website ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.