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Need ID please


Will Burn Powder
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I am not familiar enough was hoping someone could ID this revolver for me TYIA 

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00B4143F-0DA7-4309-8B55-E0FD2ADB4CA0.jpeg

0AA762F9-84F5-44E5-B06D-D7EA2968117D.jpeg

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Makers Marks are frequently under the loading lever.

This will help:

https://www.prairiedawg.net/nick/MBPProofmarks1.pdf

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Made in Italy .44 calibur I thought it looked like an 1851 but can not find any marking   

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Armi San Marco -- ASM -- is no longer in business.

Their quality control was iffy

Some of their guns were very good, but some were not good.

You never knew what you would get.

--Dawg

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It's a 1994 Armi San Marco "1851" in .44 caliber.  A gun that never really existed.  Shoot it and have fun!  If you look close at that stylized "A" it's really an A over an M..   ASM early on had excellent quality, later years... Not so much.  Don't let that concern you.  If you can find some percussion caps, go to it!

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Great info thanks everyone. This belongs to my son in laws brother and he knows I am interested in these, guess I will Try to figure out a deal so I can play with it. 
I can see myself in Josey Wales category soon. 

Edited by Will Burn Powder
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The rebated cylinder shows me it has to be a .44 gun.

 

(It's Wales, BTW.)

 

good luck, GJ

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Those are often called Frankenguns. :)  Pietta makes a model just like that.  Being a .44 with a brass frame you might want to keep keep the loads on the lighter side.

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The firearm sports an octagonal barrel. That eliminates it from being a model 1861. 

There were, and are, lots of "1851 Navy's", with an octagonal barrel, in .44 caliber, out there. There were no 1851's made in .44 caliber, in the 19th century...only .36 caliber, but today's clones have "poetic license" to change the caliber, in this day, and time. Nothing wrong with that. I like the non-historical 1851 Navy in .44 caliber.  

I have had, and I have had others state, that the brass frame revolvers will "loosen up", or stretch, given some time, and given a lot of shooting. Had that happen to me. Not everyone has had that happen to them, so I am sure they will disagree...but I have. My first black powder revolver was an 1851 Navy, in .36 caliber, with a brass frame. I shot the curds, and whey out of it, and over some time, it "stretched", and I retired it to the wall. 

 

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On 10/17/2021 at 11:09 PM, Abilene, SASS # 27489 said:

Those are often called Frankenguns. :)  Pietta makes a model just like that.  Being a .44 with a brass frame you might want to keep keep the loads on the lighter side.

If I end up owning it I plan on using light APP loads to plink with it. It is not in real bad shape however the prior user was not vigilant about cleaning and the barrel rifling does show some pitting. It is extremely tight so I assume it was not shot much, cool looking gun but certainly won't be taking the place of my ROA's :)

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