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I won/stole an 50 caliber Invest Arms Flinter oft Gunsmakemebroker.

 

What are my must haves?

 

I have seen keychain of tools set ups, who makes the best?

 

Small knapping hammer?

 

I wAs thinking of using a 31 caliber flask for a pan charger?

 

Flints your favorite?

 

Crayfish

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Those aren't the best starter flinters on the market. They're cheep, but not very well made. The touch hole is way too small and frizzens aren't well hardened. Find a way to overcome these problems and you will have fun, otherwise, lots of "flashes in the pan". Speaking from experience.!!

Al

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A ramrod with a screw attachment that goes on the end so when you ram a ball down the barrel after forgetting to put powder in first you can run the ramrod down and push hard and turn until the screw attachment until it screws into the lead ball far enough to pull it out. If you shoot it much I promise it will happen.

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Those aren't the best starter flinters on the market. They're cheep, but not very well made. The touch hole is way too small and frizzens aren't well hardened. Find a way to overcome these problems and you will have fun, otherwise, lots of "flashes in the pan". Speaking from experience.!

Al

 

Thats it in a nutshell! I wouldnt spend much on it until you see the lock will spark properly and I mean a shower of sparks that hit directly in the pan. Black english flints are best and french amber a close second. You can use a flat brass rod as a hammer....just dont use anything that could spark like steel! If the touch hole is too small enlarge to no more than ..075 using a wire gauge drill. You can get a lot of info from this site http://www.muzzleloadingforum.com/fusionbb/fusionbb.php

 

I'd recommend you buy a copy of Lymans Blackpowder Guide.

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Pipe cleaners are dandy for cleaning the touch hole, I keep two of 'em twisted around the string on my powder horn.

Patchin' will vary as to the size of your ball and the bore diameter, you want a good tight gas seal (I prefer round balls and a spit patch) -- a patched ball rifle is forgiving and will give really good accuracy from even a rough bore, as the ball is protected by the patch on its way out I've seen rifles that were smooth as the inside of a brick chimney give wonderful accuracy for that reason.

Pillow tickin' is a good choice, take your micrometer to the fabric store and get a variety of thicknesses to find which works best with your rifle. Take a look at the patches layin' out in front of your shooting position, the black streaks should be clean on them, crisp, distinct. This tells you you're getting a good gas seal.

For a 50 cal I like 2F for the main charge and 4F to prime. Make sure the touch hole is EMPTY -- I generally stick the pipe cleaner in the touch hole, dump in the main charge, seat the patched ball, bring the rifle to level, THEN remove the pipe cleaner -- I prime the pan (it don't take much) and bump the charge up against the touch hole. The idea is to flash fire THROUGH the touch hole, let the speed of the first minor explosion work for you. If there's powder in your touch hole it has to burn from grain to grain to grain and thus the nickname Flinch Lock.

My Pa started me shootin' with a hand made .36 flint which he rebuilt for me in better wood, it's a work of art and is truly his Master's Piece. As a boy I learned to make that one shot count 'cause it was the only one I had. That rifle has taken small game of all kind, I used the Hawkens he built for deer, but that .36 remains my delight. A pocket full of rifle balls, a horn of powder and I was all set for an entire day of shooting.

(pleased sigh of a reminiscing old man)

(pulls on T-shirt)

(reads legend in reverse in the bathroom mirror)

(it says "The Older I Get, The Better I Was!")

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Just keep in mind, there is a reason why percussion caps were invented.

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Babe in da woods, not.

 

I won 3rd place at my first monthly at the Dallas muzzle loader. I was shooting a CVA Hawken I snagged at a pawn shop for a song.

 

When I was in scouts I started a flint and steel fire in 30 seconds at a jamboree. My buddy in the Patriots started a fiya in 5 seconds. I was a Falcon.

 

There are ways around poor sparking. This is what the Spanish did so they could use inferior flint.

 

http://i302.photobucket.com/albums/nn107/shameless54/808D3F49-96E9-4C83-A462-351712CE7620_zpskwo8szr9.jpg

 

Cool huh. DREMEL PROJECT!

 

Investarms makes Lyman's cap guns.

 

I love the idea about using pipe cleaners on the range to clean out the touch hole, duh i use them at home to clean out the nipple causeway to the barrel.

 

I have been experimenting with patch thinness. This gun guru advocates using cigarette papers toad just thickness and always trimming your patch

 

http://blackpowderrifleaccuracy.com/patches.html

 

I'm wanting to know about tools like the touch hole pick, pan whisk broom, small knapping hammer etc. what did you buy OR what you wish you hadda bought.

 

Crayfish

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Just keep in mind, there is a reason why percussion caps were invented.

 

Just because we can doesn't mean we should. I have sold off all my percussion firearms and have nothing but flintlock Muzzleloaders. As the 1st Infantry division says, "If you're going to be one, be a Big RED One".

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Babe in da woods, not.

 

I won 3rd place at my first monthly at the Dallas muzzle loader monthly. I was shooting a CVA Hawken I snagged at a pawn shop for a song.

 

When I was in scouts I started a flint and steel fire in 30 seconds at a jamboree. My buddy in the Patriots started a fiya in 5 seconds. I was a Falcon.

 

There are ways around poor sparking. This is what the Spanish did so they could use inferior flint.

 

http://i302.photobucket.com/albums/nn107/shameless54/808D3F49-96E9-4C83-A462-351712CE7620_zpskwo8szr9.jpg

 

Cool huh.

 

Investarms makes Lyman's cap guns.

 

I love the idea about using them on the range to clean out the touch hole, duh i use them at home to clean out the nipple causeway to the barrel.

 

I have been experimenting with patch thinness. This gun guru advocates using cigarette papers toad just thickness and always trimming your patch

 

http://blackpowderrifleaccuracy.com/patches.html

 

I'm wanting to know about tools like the touch hole pick, pan whisk broom, small knapping hammer etc. what did you buy OR what you wish you hadda bought.

 

Crayfish

 

Well, you're good to go then. I guess Track of Wolf, etc sells the little whisk broom, pick and all that. I always made my own.

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Well, you're good to go then. I guess Track of Wolf, etc sells the little whisk broom, pick and all that. I always made my own.

There is a club Fun De Voo this weekend. Think I am gonna look over some shoulders at Flintlock tools etc. Have mercy on a poor boy. I hope I can make some of my own possibles.

 

Speaking of - I am thinking of making a pup tent outta white canvas and using scraps to make a possible shoulder bag and quiver for my arrows.

 

I can hardly wait to see how to throw a Tomahawk. I have always wanted to know how to throw a knife. Practicing in my backyard SHOULD help to deter nosey neighbors :~>=

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Never had a little pan broom, if I needed to clean out the pan I just wiped it with a spit-wet cleanin' patch (a yard of flannel cut into strips will make many, many, many cleaning patches!) -- then wipe with a dry patch -- back in business.

Knapped the flints when necessary by tapping the working edge with the shaft of a small screwdriver. Previous advice about not doing this over a charge in the pan is sensible.

Never saw the Spanish method for frizzens, but I do understand there at least used to be a half sole you could install on your battery piece, the alloy would throw a shower of sparks that would scare a man -- so much so they were outlawed for NMLRA competition.

No idea what the alloy was, or if it's even available anymore.

A fella gave me a touch hole pick once but I found pipe cleaners did a better job and I could steal them by the half dozen from dear old Dad (and did!)

Won a priming horn at Quaker City one summer, it was a deer antler tine, bored out with a whittled plug.

You can polish cow horn or antler either one, we used jeweler's rouge and a cloth wheel on the bench grinder, and this priming horn was polished up slick as a gut and then scrimshawed. Still have it. My best friend's grandfather (rest his soul) gave me a brown glass medicine bottle with about two shot glasses of genuine Curtis & Harvey Black Diamond 4F powder, that's what I use for priming, in that fine old man's memory. (I transferred the powder to another container. Something about keeping the Holy Black in a glass bottle makes me less than comfortable!)

You could also manufacture a calf's knee to cover your lock work if it starts to rain. The originals were leather, and made from -- you guessed it -- the hide off a calf's knee, it had two strings to tie the leather cap over the lock so she wouldn't drown out in the rain.

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BORE BUTTER.

 

"Nother thing I just happened to thunk of.

Oh yeah.

 

I buy the pine scented. I place a dollop behind each ear and the ladies give me "come hither" looks

 

Here is a cool Flinter site. Middlesex trading!

 

http://www.middlesexvillagetrading.com/

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There used to be a piece of gear that used a CO2 cartridge that blew both the powder and ball out of a muzzleloader. It had adaptors for flint lock, small rifle nipple, and musket nipple. I know TC made one, but I didn't see it in their catalog. Much easier than using a worm or screw to pull a "dry ball" or lost patch.

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Lifelong flintlock shooter and 30 year builder here.

Stuff you need:

Membership to NMLRA (www.nmlra.org)

black powder. 3F and 4F (3F will do but is a bit slower in the pan than the 4F dedicated priming powder).

Powder measure (prefer adjustable until you figure out what load your rifle wants)

Patching materials. Start with .015" patching. They sell pre-cut and pre-lubed (check Track of the Wolf)

Roundballs - for a 50cal, start with .495.

Flints (find out what size your rifle needs. if in doubt 3/4" black English fits a lot of locks).

I make my own cleaner .. 50% simple green, 50% water.

100% cotton flannel for cleaning patches

Balistol (I prefer it to petrol oils but any gun oil will work just don't overdo it).

A screwdriver with the proper fit to the lock bolts and one with proper fit for the cock jaws.

Cleaning rod / range rod(I like stainless steel with appropriate muzzle protector) but wood or brass work.

50 cal jag

Short starter (look on Track or Dixie it is clear what they are used for)

Patience as you learn.

Some kind of box (old tool box or fishing tackle box will work) to carry your junk in.

Powder horn(s) or flasks. Do NOT leave the lid off your can of powder. Serious attention getter there.

 

Nice to have.

custom made box for your stuff

hunting bag (as my wife says man purse)

Period correct clothing if you get into such things (ummmm cowboy shooting...)

knapping hammer (lots of ways to accomplish this)

lots of money to buy 5 or 6 more flintlocks

More money to buy the 5 or 6 more flintlocks after you buy the first 6.

Did I mention more money?

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Just because we can doesn't mean we should. I have sold off all my percussion firearms and have nothing but flintlock Muzzleloaders. As the 1st Infantry division says, "If you're going to be one, be a Big RED One".

Every picture you see of a mountain man heading up into the mountains shows him with two horses. The second horse carries all of the stuff required to keep s flint lock running.

 

If you haven't guessed yet, I had a real bad experience with a Pedersoli flint lock. Paid too much to start, paid a lot more trying to get it to run reliably. Never happened. Guy I sold it too spent more than I had on it and finally sent it back east to someone that replaced all of the lockwork, springs and trigger assembly and got it to run.

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Well, I think Guitar Slinger knows his stuff and should be followed for sure. :)

The only thing I'd add is this recipie for a cleaner and liquid patch lube. I used many store bought brands and made others but this recipie has been the best for me. I bring a small spray bottle filled with it. Easy to make and cheap. I didn't make this up.. Found it on the muzzleloaders forum.

I spray it on the patch lightly and ram it home. I use it as between shots to clean when I'm at the range.

 

Castor Oil 3 oz.

Murphy's Oil Soap 1 oz.

Witch Hazel 4 oz.

Isopropyl Alcohol (91%) 8 oz.

Water 16 oz.

 

The other thing Guitar Slinger is right on with is these things are more habit forming than tattoos! :) I have several but my favorite is a .36 caliber long rifle made my TVM (Matt Avance) over in Natchez Miss.

 

DSC_2611_zpsc0d3b7b0.jpg

 

DSC_2606_zpsd33ad689.jpg

 

DSC_2618_zps18dbcfa5.jpg

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