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Aunt Jen

Is it Just Style?

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I like the idea of diesel, but I need to learn mire a out it.

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:) (I think dog name 'Worthless' is so funny. And name 'Alpo' tells the love story.)

 

Brings a smile to my face.

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I'm still laughing at name "Worthless."

 

I see in my mind dog who "won't do anything," such as hunt, point, keep intruders away, chase cats or anything. My mind sees Worthless walking around with a smile in her face, tail wagging large, wanting to Play and eat...maybe digging up part of the garden...with her frustrated daddy watching her, shaking his head.

 

And if course Worthless has no idea of Daddy's expectations. She just knows he's great and she's lived.

 

So cute.

 

That is what the names Worthless and Alpo bring tonmind for me. :)

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:) :) :) how plentiful is diesel when out driving around??

Everywhere I get gas has it- ;)

This country has less diesel cars than anywhere else in the world, thanks to EPA and their BS.

Ford sells in Europe, a diesel engine Focus that gets a confirmed 60mpg. Cant sell the car here- :angry:

Subaru sells more diesel cars than they do gas powered around the world-They can't sell the diesels in USA.

OLG

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:) :) :) how plentiful is diesel when out driving around??

Around here you can get in almost everywhere. Every Circle K and Quik Trip has it, as well as every place you can get gas on any interstate or other major highway.

You can even run a diesel on used cooking oil, with a bit of refining.

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The problem with getting Diesel engines in the U.S. Has been due to the EPA having an inverted mindset. Here we measure pollution as emissions per gallon, whereas many European nations use emissions per mile. Thus an engine that gets 60 mpg from a gallon of fuel is good, but in the U.S. a gallon of fuel is a gallon of fuel.

 

I love my country, but we sure have a few idiots in charge!

 

SC

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I like the idea of diesel, but I need to learn mire a out it.

Ask away, I'd be glad to answer.

 

I'm sure others can pitch in if you stump me.

 

Additionally, do a little reading on the manufacturing process for batteries. From the ground/recycling plant through to the store shelf. Battery powered hybrids are harder on the environment than any other vehicle built (including dump trucks and OTR trucks) when you add the manufacturing process to its carbon footprint.

 

And as far as diesel cars go, I have at least a half dozen buddies getting 45-50 MPG's in them.

 

One buddy literally posted a pic of 49.5 earlier today.

 

The VW diesel cars are maintenance free to something like 150k miles too.

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Ask away, I'd be glad to answer.

 

I'm sure others can pitch in if you stump me...

 

The VW diesel cars are maintenance free to something like 150k miles too.

Thanks:

 

To start with, I think diesel cars cost more? Get better fuel economy, but are u paying for that up front?

 

Diesel for cars--small nozzle--availability??

 

I'm wondering about weird quirks? Someone telling me a year later, "Oh, you need this (special thing) that you have to do with diesels that you don't have to do with gas cars?

 

If the car is Diesel's, does he come in it?

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Thanks:

To start with:

If the car is Diesel's, does he come in it?

Some things are just better left untouched!

 

SC

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I'm thinking you need to check your enunciation before you hit send, Aunt Jenn.

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Back in the mid 80s, I owned a 1977 CJ-5 Levi's edition jeep with a 304 V8 and Wild Country 33s. The wheel base was so short and the motor-to-weight ratio so unbalanced that it did not take a second vehicle to have a wreck. Scary ride indeed.

But I would buy a CJ8 in a heartbeat if I found one for a good price.

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Thanks:

 

To start with, I think diesel cars cost more? Get better fuel economy, but are u paying for that up front?

 

Diesel for cars--small nozzle--availability??

 

I'm wondering about weird quirks? Someone telling me a year later, "Oh, you need this (special thing) that you have to do with diesels that you don't have to do with gas cars?

 

If the car is Diesel's, does he come in it?

There are so many diesel vehicles on the road today, nearly every single gas station in my area has at least one pump with diesel. All of these pumps have small nozzles.

 

In fact, the only time I see the large hi flow nozzles anymore is when I go to the big rig pumps at a truck stop, and that's only when I'm towing one of our larger trailers and I'm forced to stop somewhere that has a cramped auto diesel area. Not an issue whatsoever.

 

I also don't know of a thing that's needed to operate a diesel car that isn't needed for a gas car.

 

Manufacturer recommended oil change intervals are even the same on newer models.

 

They're built for the average American, meaning they're built for the guy that puts his key in it and drives it until he gets a light on the dash. Performing absolutely no maintenance himself. VW warranty was pretty outstanding when we looked at them too. Better than most any other car I can think of.

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BMW and Mercedes are both offering diesel options the states now too I believe.

 

If not now, those models are on the immediate horizon.

 

Think Audi is too.

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And rumor has it that 2016 may be last year if this generation for the Jetta? New for 2017?

 

With that, is it better to have the last model year if a successful generation, or the first model year if the new generation???

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Buy used, warranties transfer.

 

Price up front if you're buying new will go back in your pocket when you're not replacing batteries too.

 

Also, if you're enviro minded... Diesel particulate matter (pollutants) is heavier than O2.

 

So it falls to the ground, rather than contributing to the greenhouse effect.

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And rumor has it that 2016 may be last year if this generation for the Jetta? New for 2017?

 

With that, is it better to have the last model year if a successful generation, or the first model year if the new generation???

All else equal, it's always better to buy the proven model over the latest and greatest.

 

I'm always a model or two behind the newest thing. Weather it's horse trailers or the pickups pulling them.

 

It's not just for track record either, for me. I like it when the knowledge to fix any issues I might run into is already out there.

 

Sucks to be the first guy to have problem X.

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I can't think of any unhappy Jetta TDI owners, and it's the go to daily driver for a lot of the guys I ran around with in my other hobby.

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I can't think of any unhappy Jetta TDI owners, and it's the go to daily driver for a lot of the guys I ran around with in my other hobby.

What other hobby?

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Hot rod diesels.

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Oh. Great! I'll go look at some and learn more.

 

Thank you all.

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Thanks:

 

To start with, I think diesel cars cost more? Get better fuel economy, but are u paying for that up front?

 

Diesel for cars--small nozzle--availability??

 

I'm wondering about weird quirks? Someone telling me a year later, "Oh, you need this (special thing) that you have to do with diesels that you don't have to do with gas cars?

 

If the car is Diesel's, does he come in it?

Diesel cars don't cost much more than their gas counterparts, unlike hybrids. As I posted before, diesel is very available, and costs less than gas. Most gas stations have diesel have it in small nozzles specifically for diesel cars. Big Trucks aren't allowed to fuel up there.

As for quirks, I don't think so. Now in a Big Truck, you have to add something called "Diesel Exhaust Fluid", or DEF in a separate tank. I don't know if a diesel car uses it, but I don't think so. And diesel engines were invented before gas engines, so they're not coming up with new stuff, (like emission control systems), as much as gas engines.

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I think all the smaller diesels are under the PPM that requires DEF.

 

The pickups might still be running without it, if the big three weren't making more and more power every year.

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Do u have to buy DEF separately,

Yup-

http://www.autozone.com/miscellaneous-cleaners-and-degreasers/diesel-exhaust-fluid

 

More info-

http://us.air1.info/en/all-about-def/what-is-def/

 

BTW: GOGGLE is your friend ^_^

 

OLG

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More info-

http://us.air1.info/en/all-about-def/what-is-def/

 

BTW: GOGGLE is your friend ^_^

 

OLG

Maybe I'm looking at that info wrong? I looked at that page and it said:

Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) - How much do I need?

Average consumption of Diesel Exhaust Fluid is generally 3% per gallon of diesel fuel, so you will need to tank much less for DEF then you do for diesel fuel. 2.5 gallons of Air1 Diesel Exhaust Fluid will yield over 350 miles of travel.

 

Does that mean that I'd need to put in 2.5 gallons of DEF for every car fuel tank of diesel?

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Maybe I'm looking at that info wrong? I looked at that page and it said:

Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) - How much do I need?

Average consumption of Diesel Exhaust Fluid is generally 3% per gallon of diesel fuel, so you will need to tank much less for DEF then you do for diesel fuel. 2.5 gallons of Air1 Diesel Exhaust Fluid will yield over 350 miles of travel.

 

Does that mean that I'd need to put in 2.5 gallons of DEF for every car fuel tank of diesel?

I found this on Amazon. http://www.amazon.com/BlueDEF-DEF002-Diesel-Exhaust-Fluid/dp/B004O80QP8But even if you get it at the car parts store....

 

...This is one of those surprise extras I was wondering about before?

 

I'm wondering if I'm reading it right but it seems that if I go to the gas station, fill up with diesel, I need also to refill the DEF tank each gtime for an additional 8 or 10 dollars? ??

 

Someone will correct me, I hope. :)

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More info here-

Diesel exhaust fluid is one of the key elements of the Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) process used by most medium and heavy-duty engine builders to meet EPA 2010 regulations. BlueDEF is a non-toxic solution of 67.5 percent purified water and 32.5 percent ultra pure automotive grade urea. BlueDEF is not a fuel or fuel additive. Instead, when injected into the exhaust stream and passed over a catalyst, BlueDEF helps convert NOx into nitrogen gas and water vapor, two harmless and natural components of the air. BlueDEF is stable, colorless and odorless, and meets ISO Standards 22241 for purity and composition and is an American Petroleum Institute (API) certified diesel exhaust fluid. These are the highest quality and safety standards in place to ensure optimum SCR performance. Making sure you do not run out of BlueDEF in a SCR equipped truck is simple, watch the Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) gauge, which is part of the diesel fuel gauge, for when it is time to refill. DEF is stored in a dedicated tank next to the fuel tank on the driver's side. The tanks range in size from 6 to 23 gallons depending on the truck's application. The DEF tank fill opening is designed to accommodate a DEF fill nozzle to ensure only DEF is put into the tank. A diesel fuel nozzle will not fit into the DEF tank opening.

 

OLG

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I love my country, but we sure have a few idiots in charge!

 

SC

 

Fixed it for you.

 

Back in the mid 80s, I owned a 1977 CJ-5 Levi's edition jeep with a 304 V8 and Wild Country 33s. The wheel base was so short and the motor-to-weight ratio so unbalanced that it did not take a second vehicle to have a wreck. Scary ride indeed.

But I would buy a CJ8 in a heartbeat if I found one for a good price.

 

I had to pass on a Scrambler a few years back because the the money just wasn't there. The owner had painted it an awful bright green, and it needed a clutch, but was otherwise solid. 258 turned over and sounded good with over 100K on it, as I recall.

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Doc-When you own and drive a CJ, it's best to learn to do your own wrenching.

Top quality clutch(Luk)is about $250.00 in parts. That's the throw-out bearing, pilot bearing along with pressure plate and friction disc.

OLG

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More info here-

Diesel exhaust fluid is one of the key elements of the Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) process used by most medium and heavy-duty engine builders to meet EPA 2010 regulations. BlueDEF is a non-toxic solution of 67.5 percent purified water and 32.5 percent ultra pure automotive grade urea. BlueDEF is not a fuel or fuel additive. Instead, when injected into the exhaust stream and passed over a catalyst, BlueDEF helps convert NOx into nitrogen gas and water vapor, two harmless and natural components of the air. BlueDEF is stable, colorless and odorless, and meets ISO Standards 22241 for purity and composition and is an American Petroleum Institute (API) certified diesel exhaust fluid. These are the highest quality and safety standards in place to ensure optimum SCR performance. Making sure you do not run out of BlueDEF in a SCR equipped truck is simple, watch the Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) gauge, which is part of the diesel fuel gauge, for when it is time to refill. DEF is stored in a dedicated tank next to the fuel tank on the driver's side. The tanks range in size from 6 to 23 gallons depending on the truck's application. The DEF tank fill opening is designed to accommodate a DEF fill nozzle to ensure only DEF is put into the tank. A diesel fuel nozzle will not fit into the DEF tank opening.

 

OLG

Thank Lumpy. You just saved me all that. :lol:

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