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Pulp, SASS#28319

Thing NOT to do with an 1860 Army revolver.

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You know those leather rifle rest sandbags they sell at WalMart, I think they're Winchester brand.

 

Anyway, don't use them as a rest for a cap and ball revolver. :rolleyes:

 

Triple7 3f will burn a hole through the leather.

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Now... what kind of leather are them bags...? :rolleyes:

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Now... what kind of leather are them bags...? :rolleyes:

 

Pleather?

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COULDN'T be... Ain't them nauga's on the endangeres species list...? :huh:

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COULDN'T be... Ain't them nauga's on the endangeres species list...? :huh:

 

 

 

there is a story behind those little buggers...lol!

 

http://www.naugahyde.com/history.html

 

GG ~ :FlagAm:

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I have seen some pure JUNK shooting accessories bearing the WINCHESTER brand. It seems like for money they will license any type of Chinese crap.

 

Drifter

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I have seen some pure JUNK shooting accessories bearing the WINCHESTER brand. It seems like for money they will license any type of Chinese crap.

 

Drifter

 

They just don't seem to learn. Back in the 1920's & 30's they had lines of tools, kitchen appliances, and peripheral products that really had nothing to do with their core business of firearms. They were on the verge of bankruptcy when WWII broke out and saved them.

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They just don't seem to learn. Back in the 1920's & 30's they had lines of tools, kitchen appliances, and peripheral products that really had nothing to do with their core business of firearms. They were on the verge of bankruptcy when WWII broke out and saved them.

 

 

After gearing up production for World War I, Winchester found itself with a surplus of skilled employees when the war ended. Rather than lay off good workers, Winchester expanded its product line to include tools (I have a Winchester hand ax that is excellent quality) and even appliances.

 

If I remember correctly, they were one of the few corporations that did not lay off employees during the depression, but I could be wrong on that. When WW II started up, Winchester focused on arms production - and had the skilled labor force to do it.

 

So what, I wonder, has led to the decline of Winchester since, say, 1960?

 

Buena suerte, amigos

eGG

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After gearing up production for World War I, Winchester found itself with a surplus of skilled employees when the war ended. Rather than lay off good workers, Winchester expanded its product line to include tools (I have a Winchester hand ax that is excellent quality) and even appliances.

 

If I remember correctly, they were one of the few corporations that did not lay off employees during the depression, but I could be wrong on that. When WW II started up, Winchester focused on arms production - and had the skilled labor force to do it.

 

So what, I wonder, has led to the decline of Winchester since, say, 1960?

 

Buena suerte, amigos

eGG

 

I'd say since 1964 its been MONEY (or lack of or wantin more)

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So what, I wonder, has led to the decline of Winchester since, say, 1960?

 

 

 

Lawyers and bean counters

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there is a story behind those little buggers...lol!

 

http://www.naugahyde.com/history.html

 

GG ~ :FlagAm:

Good Grief! did you see the cute pictures of them on that link? the seem to be civilized! and we have been skinning them for lazy boy recliners and diner seating and cheap car interiors.... shocking simply shocking (if that are really thinking about protecting them I will need to do a better job hiding my trap lines :rolleyes: )

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I got my first 1860 replica when I was... oh, eighteen or nineteen. Not a whole lot of folks around with black powder experience back then, so I and a couple of buddies relied heavily on written material - which was plentiful and fascinating.

 

Well... since the written word proclaimed that proper clean-up was best effected with hot water and soap, we took it to the next logical step - the dishwasher~!! Disassembled our revolvers and placed the pieces in the machine at the hottest setting with plenty of "soap."

 

Uh... don't do this, folks. Resist any temptation... :(

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