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Raised some Cain w/Cabela's


RHL

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My RCBS kit came today along with a box of equal size containing all of the dies, shell holders and misc things that I purchased besides the Rock Chucker Supreme Master Reloading Kit.

That would be fine except there was no packaging inside this oversized box containing these items. Threaded items. all of the dies had come out of their cases and were scattered about the box with the other items.

I ran the threads with the collars on the dies and all seems to be OK but I gave Cabela's a friendly call to let them know that their packaging was inadequate, especially for reloading equipment.

 

This is my first try at reloading so I'm not 100% sure what to look for in terms of more likely to be damaged parts.

 

Any pointers on areas to note is appreciated

Thanks,

John aka Rosado Hombre Lobo

 

P.S. the Chucker's packaging was terrific.

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You should be good to go... but be sure the decapping pin is straight (it likely is, but that's about the weakest part).

 

Be careful, watch your powder charges, and have fun! ^_^

 

(BTW - you can find any number of clips on YouTube if you need some visual pointers...)

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Thanks hardpan. I'll give the decapping pin a closer look-see.

I appreciate the pointer!

P.S. I love the YouTube clips! They take away some of the apprehension.

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Howdy, Rosado!

 

Well, although you will undoubtedly someday desire a progressive loader (think Dillon! :rolleyes: ), you picked prolly the best single stage press possible. Wish I had one!

 

Back in the early 70's, I bought an RCBS Jr... the Rock Chucker was prolly a whopping seven or ten bucks or so more then... prohibitively expensive for a starving college student! :rolleyes:

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Well, unless you plan to do serious precision work, dies are pretty darn tough to damage. The only significant damage likely (other than easily fixed pins) is scratches to the carbide sizing ring, and by its very nature that's unlikely to happen just by bouncing around with other dies. Now, cosmetic damage is a whole different story, and hopefully they take your message seriously, there's no excuse for that kind of thing. If you'd had a scale in there, or a set of calipers or any number of more fragile items it could have been an expensive error on their part. Heck, if the dies were high end fancy ones at $100 a pop... I'd have made them cover freight to return the ones that got banged around and have them ship replacements immediately.

 

Enjoy the great press. You'll be using it for the rest of your life, even if you eventually buy a progressive for volume reloading. There are things that are just easier and more appropriately done on a single stage than a progressive.

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Hardpan, I remember the 70's and 80's 7-10 dollars made a guy scratch his head pretty hard back then. I remember an ATM shorting me $20 when I first started using them and I was financially traumatized until the bank opened the following Monday. :o

 

Wolf, Hardpan, I was thinking the same thing... a progressive in the future but I figured that I'd better jump in slowly. SWMBO isn't exactly thrilled that I've found another hobby to go with woodworking and motorcycling. LOL Plus, I think I need to slow down a bit. I've bought all of my guns and a couple backups since last September. That extra $$$ for the Dillon 550 or 650 progressive machines would have eaten into the gun safe I want to purchase.

 

Y'all know what I'm talking about.

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RHL, Videos on You Tube are great, but if you are new to reloading, see if you can get a pard to come by and help you get started. There's nothing scary about it, but it is always helpful to get the benefit of someone who has been there...

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I ordered a set of dies from them one time, and there were 2 seating dies inside and no sizing die. Was a hassle to get it corrected. MT

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Building loads and being able to shoot more for less are only part of the deal. The self reliance that you can build your own is reassuring. Biggest error is powder charge. Always double check. Experience will allow you to examine a tray of charged cases and pick out a low or high powder level. Either can be bad news. It sounds as though you are taking a good approach and have the right attitude.

 

Good shootin'!

 

CR

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Howdy

 

I had an issue with Cabela's a number of years ago. I had ordered a nice stainless rifle case. They shipped it in the same box it came in from the manufacturer. When it got to my house the box had been punctured and the case was dented. I called them up to complain and they said to send it back. I then mentioned that I thought the shipping container was inadequate and they should have packed it in something that protected it better.

 

A week or so later I got a new package from Cabela's, much larger than the first. Their shipping department had custom made a shipping container for the case. They had covered the factory box with 1/2" thick styrofoam sheets for protection, then made a custom cardboard box to go around that. The rifle case had come through without a scratch. I was very impressed, somebody had spent a lot of time making a custom shipping container, obviously cutting deep into their profit for the case. I sent them a letter and told them how impressed I was. I got a letter back thanking me for my letter and stating that they had posted it on their employee bulletin board and they loved getting positive feedback like that for their employees.

 

This was several years ago, but I was very impressed with Cabela's response to my complaint. If you get a positive outcome like that, be sure to let the vendor know that you appreciate their extra effort.

 

Regarding loading on a single stage, I too started loading on a single stage. I too wanted to go slowly and dip my toe in the water with single stage before going progressive. You will not regret your decision, it will make you a good reloader.

 

Let me tell you about the 'two loading blocks' method of reloading. Basically, you have a loading block full of cases on one side of the press and an empty loading block on the other side. Every time you perform a particular operation, you pass the case from one block to the other. This method almost guaranties that no case will be overlooked, and no case will be processed twice. It is most valuable in preventing under charges or over charges of powder. When using just one block, and returning each processed shell to the same block, it is easy to loose your place and perhaps miss a case, or double charge one. With the two block method, if you move the cases from the 'to be processed' block to the 'just got processed' block, it is almost fool proof. Then before you seat any bullets, give the block full of charged cases the old eyeball test. Peer into each case under strong light to make sure that they all have the same level of powder in them. If you use a good case filling powder like Unique, a double charge will stand out like a sore thumb. So will an under charge. Only after giving each row of the loading block the 'eyeball test' do you seat any bullets. The two block method takes no more time on a single stage press than the single block method does. When I first started reloading I made my own loading blocks from hardwood, with holes that accept 45 Colt and 44-40 cases. I have about seven of them and still use them even when I use my progressive presses. It helps me keep track of exactly how many cases I am loading. Keeping track of exactly how many cases and exactly how many bullets is a good way to prevent stuffing two bullets into one case.

 

When and if you decide to go progressive, their are more brands out there than Dillon. I have two Hornady Lock & Load AP presses that I have been using for years now. I can give you the reasons why I like them some other time.

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Howdy

 

I had an issue with Cabela's a number of years ago. I had ordered a nice stainless rifle case. They shipped it in the same box it came in from the manufacturer. When it got to my house the box had been punctured and the case was dented. I called them up to complain and they said to send it back. I then mentioned that I thought the shipping container was inadequate and they should have packed it in something that protected it better.

 

A week or so later I got a new package from Cabela's, much larger than the first. Their shipping department had custom made a shipping container for the case. They had covered the factory box with 1/2" thick styrofoam sheets for protection, then made a custom cardboard box to go around that. The rifle case had come through without a scratch. I was very impressed, somebody had spent a lot of time making a custom shipping container, obviously cutting deep into their profit for the case. I sent them a letter and told them how impressed I was. I got a letter back thanking me for my letter and stating that they had posted it on their employee bulletin board and they loved getting positive feedback like that for their employees.

 

This was several years ago, but I was very impressed with Cabela's response to my complaint. If you get a positive outcome like that, be sure to let the vendor know that you appreciate their extra effort.

 

Regarding loading on a single stage, I too started loading on a single stage. I too wanted to go slowly and dip my toe in the water with single stage before going progressive. You will not regret your decision, it will make you a good reloader.

 

Let me tell you about the 'two loading blocks' method of reloading. Basically, you have a loading block full of cases on one side of the press and an empty loading block on the other side. Every time you perform a particular operation, you pass the case from one block to the other. This method almost guaranties that no case will be overlooked, and no case will be processed twice. It is most valuable in preventing under charges or over charges of powder. When using just one block, and returning each processed shell to the same block, it is easy to loose your place and perhaps miss a case, or double charge one. With the two block method, if you move the cases from the 'to be processed' block to the 'just got processed' block, it is almost fool proof. Then before you seat any bullets, give the block full of charged cases the old eyeball test. Peer into each case under strong light to make sure that they all have the same level of powder in them. If you use a good case filling powder like Unique, a double charge will stand out like a sore thumb. So will an under charge. Only after giving each row of the loading block the 'eyeball test' do you seat any bullets. The two block method takes no more time on a single stage press than the single block method does. When I first started reloading I made my own loading blocks from hardwood, with holes that accept 45 Colt and 44-40 cases. I have about seven of them and still use them even when I use my progressive presses. It helps me keep track of exactly how many cases I am loading. Keeping track of exactly how many cases and exactly how many bullets is a good way to prevent stuffing two bullets into one case.

 

When and if you decide to go progressive, their are more brands out there than Dillon. I have two Hornady Lock & Load AP presses that I have been using for years now. I can give you the reasons why I like them some other time.

 

I just wanted to say the "two loading block" method is excellent advice. Before I went progressive, I did all my rounds that way, and never had a squib or any other ammo related problem. It ensures that each process happens the same way to each cartridge.

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Usually I've had good service from Cabella's but a few months ago I ordered Scope, Weaver Scope mounts and rings. Scope and rings came, but got a back order on the mounts. Then new catalog came a few weeks later and they listed the Weaver mounts again. I called and made sure my order was still open and the mounts were available (it was and they were), but they said to complete my order I had to buy minimum of TWO of the mounts and that my order had to be minimum of $40. So, I added a twenty dollar item I didn't need to get it over $40 and ordered the second scope mount. They shipped the unneeded item and back ordered the scope mounts again. When I called them about it they said the weaver scope mounts had been discontinued even though Weaver still lists them as a current product. I called to complain, they persuaded me to switch to different brand of scope mount and said they'd ship it to me without a shipping charge. The whole sad story played out over several months. I should receive the substitute mounts this week. So, my most recent Cabella's experience hasn't been very satisfactory.

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Hardpan, I'm still waiting on some backordered bullets. Right now I have .357 cases and .45 bullets, I need their counterparts. LOL I guess I could start with some of my .45 empties but I'm not sitting on that many right now.

 

Driftwood, I always enjoy and learn from your post on the forum. Thanks for taking the time to give a great, detailed description of the two loading block method. I'll definitely be using that method.

 

I bought the RCBS DVD and it is pretty good about giving a general beginner's version of reloading but I really value the advice that I get from the guys that are loading away at home.

 

I used to work in shipping and receiving when I was a young guy just starting out and my boss would have eaten me alive for doing a poor packaging job. We would cut boxes down and mostly that was all many items needed, get rid of the airspace so things don't fly about while they are being thrown around in shipping. Believe me, things get thrown at the loading centers. The customer service lady at Cabela's was very nice, so I'm just thinking that someone in shipping got lazy and let one slip through.

 

I've been looking at steel gun cabinets online as I can't find a local dealer for these things, the cabinets, not the safes. Reading the reviews for some of these cabinets just scared me away from buying one online. They were arriving with bent and dented panels and like in Driftwood Johnson's case they have no additional packing material.

 

The internet is awesome and online purchasing is a great convenience for some of us that are considered remote but sometimes it is hit & miss.

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