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millcreekmolly

Question regarding 100gr vs 105gr bullets

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Hi,

I currently load a 38 special 105 gr bullet and have no trouble with knock down  targets at my local matches. I was in the process of ordering more and I saw that the company offered a 100gr bullet and that a customer review said they used them in CAS and had no problems. Has anyone had experience or problems with a 100 gr bullet and knock downs?  I am a new loader and looking for advice. Thanks

 

Molly McFearsome

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Order a sample pack and give'em a try.

ME-Don't try to 'fix', what ain't broke.

5gns of bullet weight ain't much in .38cal.

OLG

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No significant difference between 100 and 105 grain.  Both are pretty light for some knockdowns.  Whether they will take down KDs depends upon how fast the muzzle velocity is.   Here's why:

 

Knockdowns are usually calibrated to go down with a .22 pistol hit in center (which is about a 38 power factor).  

 

Knockdowns are required by rules to be calibrated with no more than a .38 special 158 grain center hit.   At 800 FPS, that is a 126 power factor.  

 

If you have a 700 FPS load with 105 grains, you are shooting 74 power factor.

From this, you can see there is a LOT of range of PROPERLY calibrated targets which your loads could have difficulty taking down.

 

The practical way many shooters handle this is to make a box or two of heavy bullet, moderate velocity loads for your pistols.  When you come upon a match and stage where you see other shooters getting good hits but the KDs stay up, you go get your heavy loads and shoot them on this one stage.  You can probably run them in your rifle, too, but you will only need to in extreme situations.  Test them before trusting them to feed.

 

Good luck, GJ

Edited by Garrison Joe, SASS #60708
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I wouldn't change simply for a 5 grain difference, The recoil difference will be so small as to not be felt, IMO. You can get that  much difference in felt recoil just by the small amount if standard deviation from loads. If the 100gr would solve a feeding problem in you rifle it would be worth pursuing.

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Bullet shape is the most important issue for me.   The 5 grain bullet weight is nothing, but  the nose shape and length to assure proper feeding.     GW

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I load and shoot 100gr .38 in my pistols and love them... I generally shoot a .32 H & R Marlin rifle and mostly shoot a 78 grain bullet - I don't have problems with knockdowns provided that I hit them...Now, on occasion, there are snippy Texas Star plates that need s 50 Cal to knock the plate off...but those, for me, are too few and far between, to make up a batch of "heavy loads". 

 

Hugs,

Scarlett

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Buy a box of factory, 38 Special lead bullets (125 grain or 158 grain) and toss it in you gun cart for knockdowns.  Sometimes match directors set knockdown targets so that heavier bullets are required (like in windy conditions).  Then don't worry about whether your light bullets will do the job.  I have seen .36 caliber cap and ball revolvers fail to take down knockdowns. 
 

Edited by Edward R S Canby, SASS#59971
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