Jump to content
SASS Wire Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Subdeacon Joe

An F-86 Story

Recommended Posts

Mind if I Borrow This?

 

Even as the powerful F-100 and other Century Series jets were carrying the U.S. Air Force to supersonic speeds in the 1950s, the North American F-86 Sabre was still a trusted fighter. Its reputation as a MiG killer, earned during the Korean War, made flying the Sabrejet a young airman’s dream. It wasn’t easy, especially considering the competition. Many F-86 pilots were World War II veterans with combat experience.

 

New Sabre pilots faced at least a year of training, including several hundred hours of classroom work and several hundred more of dual and solo flight time. After that came 15 hours in a cockpit simulator. During the student’s first flight in the single-seat fighter, an instructor flew on his wing, teaching via radio.

 

And then there was Airman First Class George R. Johnson. A 20-year-old mechanic at Williams Air Force Base in Arizona, Johnson skipped the preliminaries; on the evening of September 20, 1956, he took a Sabrejet up for a ride. Up to then, Johnson’s piloting experience amounted to two hours with an instructor in a Piper Cub.

 

Quite a story. And shows how times have changed. Now there would likely be all sorts of investigations, hearing, and officiousness.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That was a pretty good read.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That was an excellent read. The F86D Saber Jet was my favorite. POPS stayed in the Air Force over twenty years, plus his Navt time during WWll and I was there to see all the changes. It truly was a living history. I saw the last Command of Derigibles in SCOTT AFB Illinois, the first of the jets at Kelly, and the engines being tested befor ebeing used.I sawe the X99, not many can say that, and I saw it alot. The B66's were qunique and did no last long. in fact most of the fighters that came out in the late 50's-60's did not last long replaced by the next best thing. Bone yards of T6 Texans, many went on to be movie heros.

I went to High School in White Settlement, Texas, straight down from the school was Convair as 52's ran off of their proerty they rolled on to military property, thos 52" are still in service today, we got to watch their shke down cruises and their jet escorts try to stay up. Thanks for bringing back some great memories.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dang I love that plane! :wub:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That was an excellent read. The F86D Saber Jet was my favorite. POPS stayed in the Air Force over twenty years, plus his Navt time during WWll and I was there to see all the changes. It truly was a living history. I saw the last Command of Derigibles in SCOTT AFB Illinois, the first of the jets at Kelly, and the engines being tested befor ebeing used.I sawe the X99, not many can say that, and I saw it alot. The B66's were qunique and did no last long. in fact most of the fighters that came out in the late 50's-60's did not last long replaced by the next best thing. Bone yards of T6 Texans, many went on to be movie heros.

I went to High School in White Settlement, Texas, straight down from the school was Convair as 52's ran off of their proerty they rolled on to military property, thos 52" are still in service today, we got to watch their shke down cruises and their jet escorts try to stay up. Thanks for bringing back some great memories.

 

 

I thought B-52s were made by Boeing?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought B-52s were made by Boeing?

 

Maybe B-58s? Or -36s?

 

here is an interesting photo of a BUFF: Holy SOCKS! It Kept flying!

 

B-52H (61-0023), configured at the time as a testbed to investigate structural failures, still flying after its vertical stabilizer sheared off in severe turbulence on 10 January 1964. The aircraft landed safely

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe B-58s? Or -36s?

 

here is an interesting photo of a BUFF: Holy SOCKS! It Kept flying!

 

 

You're right it was the 58 Hustler, my mistake. Carswell had so many 52's , that is what my mind was thinking of (getting old does not help the memory), they kept 52's in the air 24 hours a day and all were loaded. They had trouble with chase planes for the 58's not being able to keep up. Then if I remember right they had trouble keeping the 58's in the air.

Subdeacon Joe, that is one heck of a photo, who would think that big of a plane would keep flying and then land without a tail section.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That was an excellent read. The F86D Saber Jet was my favorite. POPS stayed in the Air Force over twenty years, plus his Navt time during WWll and I was there to see all the changes. It truly was a living history. I saw the last Command of Derigibles in SCOTT AFB Illinois, the first of the jets at Kelly, and the engines being tested befor ebeing used.I sawe the X99, not many can say that, and I saw it alot. The B66's were qunique and did no last long. in fact most of the fighters that came out in the late 50's-60's did not last long replaced by the next best thing. Bone yards of T6 Texans, many went on to be movie heros.

I went to High School in White Settlement, Texas, straight down from the school was Convair as 52's ran off of their proerty they rolled on to military property, thos 52" are still in service today, we got to watch their shke down cruises and their jet escorts try to stay up. Thanks for bringing back some great memories.

 

"Don't give me an 86D

with rockets, radar, and AD.

It goes fast. I don't care.

It blows up in the air.

Don't give me an 86D."

 

Posted on a bulletin board in the O club at Offutt AFB in about 1962-1963

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wish I knew how to pictures and the like. After maintaining the F-15 for over 20 years, the one that comes to mind are pictures of an Israily F-15 that lost the whole right wing in a mid-air collision with an A-4. It landed safely. The pilot was an experienced F-4 pilot in up grade training to the F-15. He was busy controlling the aircraft and wasn't aware of the damages until after he landed. You can goggles f-15 missing wing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wish I knew how to pictures and the like. After maintaining the F-15 for over 20 years, the one that comes to mind are pictures of an Israily F-15 that lost the whole right wing in a mid-air collision with an A-4. It landed safely. The pilot was an experienced F-4 pilot in up grade training to the F-15. He was busy controlling the aircraft and wasn't aware of the damages until after he landed. You can goggles f-15 missing wing.

 

 

Can't post photos directly here. Just cut and paste the links to them here.

 

Here is a video

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Deacon, those are tricks I've yet to master. LOL. Hopefully I will soon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a link to some great pictures of a re-stored B-17. Some of you may have seen them before, but, they are some great shots.

B-17

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can't post photos directly here. Just cut and paste the links to them here.

 

Here is a video

 

 

 

 

Thrust is good! :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The egress seat is the ACES II which is also in the F-16, A-10, B1 and I think the B-2 also. Their motto is "Thrust You Can Trust"!!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.