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working on the .45


Bad Face Bob

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Hi folks...does anyone have information on videos or other sources of information on do-it-youself trigger jobs/action work on the clone saa.45s??? Also, is there a source for parts, like a barrel that someone shot black powder thru and then did'nt clean, resulting in a barrel that is unusable??? Haha....Thanks, and good shootin'...badfacebob...

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Hi there, Nota John, and thanks for your interest...These pistols are 'ARMI SAN MARCO MADE IN ITALY'...I know that they are out of business, but, I've been told that they are an'exact' replica of the Colt??? They are a 5 1/2" bbl, and it looks that I could have the bbl cut down to 4" and avoid most of the corruption...But if i could buy a new 4" bbl i think i would be better off...These pistols have had nice action/trigger work done, and other than the bbls i think they will be serviceable. Not only the inside of the bbls are pitted, but the outside of the bbls and the inside and outside of the cylinders are pitted...I've done a little work on the outside of the guns and cold blued them, and they look ok..It's more important to me that they shoot strait....Thanks, Badfacebob...

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Howdy

 

Barrels are measured from the front face of the cylinder, not the front of the frame. 4 3/4" is about as short as you can cut most SAA type barrels without needing to do something about the ejector rod housing. I dunno what thread Armi San Marco used on their barrels, but I am pretty sure it is not the same as a Colt.

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Howdy

 

Barrels are measured from the front face of the cylinder, not the front of the frame. 4 3/4" is about as short as you can cut most SAA type barrels without needing to do something about the ejector rod housing. I dunno what thread Armi San Marco used on their barrels, but I am pretty sure it is not the same as a Colt.

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Howdy yourself, Driftwood, and thank you for your reply and interest...Yes, I know how to measure the bbl length, and am willing to change/adapt the ejector rod housing...Since some guns were made in 4" bbl lengths with their appropiately sized ejectors, I am hoping someone else has changed their bbls and ejectors, and has info on parts...Thanks again, and good shootin' badfacebob...

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Have you shot the pistols? They may shoot just fine and james dandy in spite of having "sewer pipe" barrels. I have seen guns with really nasty looking bores out-shoot guns with pristine shiny bores. If they absolutely won't group at all probly cheaper to sell 'em off or trade for new than switchin' barrels especially countin' either your time or a gunsmith's.

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Since you've discounted the barrel's value anyway, you might try lapping them. Get some #400 and #800lapping compound from Brownell's (If it's really bad you might use #220 first). Drill a hole in an oversize bullet and thread it for a ramrod (probably 8x32). Coat the first half inch or so with #400 lapping compound, then drive the bullet into the barrel. Screw the ramrod into the bullet and work it back and forth in the barrel the full length until it works easily. Repeat using the #400 a couple of times using a new bullet each time. Finish with the #800 using the same procedure.

I've had pretty good luck using this method on old barrels.

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Howdy Again

 

I will repeat the question about have you shot them. I have a couple of 100+ year old lever rifles, and the bores are quite old and pitted. But the rifling is still strong and they are still tack drivers. If you shoot them you may find out that the barrels are not as bad as you think.

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Since you've discounted the barrel's value anyway, you might try lapping them. Get some #400 and #800lapping compound from Brownell's (If it's really bad you might use #220 first). Drill a hole in an oversize bullet and thread it for a ramrod (probably 8x32). Coat the first half inch or so with #400 lapping compound, then drive the bullet into the barrel. Screw the ramrod into the bullet and work it back and forth in the barrel the full length until it works easily. Repeat using the #400 a couple of times using a new bullet each time. Finish with the #800 using the same procedure.

I've had pretty good luck using this method on old barrels.

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Thank you, cypress slim...This is good info. The big problem with these bbls is that a lot of the corruption and pitting is on the last inch or so of each bbl, and extends onto the bbl muzzle face..One pistol shoots way to the left but the other seems to be ok, or at least hits the sass targets. I think that if i were to cut the bbls down some that they would work, but i think that I will just buy some new ones and be done with it. I have heard that it's very hard to get parts for the italian pistols, and generally they must go back to italy to be fixed..Do you have any info on this??? Thanks again and good shootin'...badfacebob @aol.com

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Howdy

 

The condition of the bores near the muzzle may have nothing to do with where your pistols print. First, before you do any cutting, determine how accurate the pistols are. By this I do not mean where they print, I mean how do they group. If your pistols can print a reasonably small group, the bores are not the problem. You may need to turn the barrel slightly to adjust the point of impact to the point of aim.

 

Also, don't forget that most right handed shooters will push their shots to the left if they have too much finger on the trigger. Be sure you are pulling the trigger with the pad of your trigger finger, do not place the trigger in the crease under the first knuckle. Pulling the trigger that way is a classic way to push shots to one side.

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Howdy

 

The condition of the bores near the muzzle may have nothing to do with where your pistols print.

 

Exactly. If the rifling is strong down most of the barrel the last inch won't really make a difference.

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If they were mine, I would cut them to 3-1/2", remove the ejector rod housing boss, touch up the bare metal and shoot 'em as Storekeepers. I think that the SAA's balance much better w/o the ejector rod housings. Colt actually made a few target flattops w/o ejector rods, according the 2010 offerings on the US Firearms webpage.

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Hi folks...does anyone have information on videos or other sources of information on do-it-youself trigger jobs/action work on the clone saa.45s??? Also, is there a source for parts, like a barrel that someone shot black powder thru and then did'nt clean, resulting in a barrel that is unusable??? Haha....Thanks, and good shootin'...badfacebob...

Well, I've kicked over an anthill on this deal...I thank each of you for answering, and you options...Let me put this to rest..I'll just buy a couple new pistols,& get them the way I want them. Thanks, and good shootin' ...badfacebob

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Well, I've kicked over an anthill on this deal...I thank each of you for answering, and you options...Let me put this to rest..I'll just buy a couple new pistols,& get them the way I want them. Thanks, and good shootin' ...badfacebob

Bob that may be best,because their isn't a lot in the way of parts for ASM guns as they are out of business. Adios Sgt. Jake
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