Jump to content
SASS Wire Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Buckshot Frank

73 carbine- crooked magazine tube?

Recommended Posts

I picked up my brand new Uberti 1873 carbine on Wed. I thought that the front sight (on barrel band) looked a little crooked, but figured that I was just being paranoid. Tonight I confirmed with a level that the barrel band is crooked causing the magazine tube to be scewed to one side :FlagAm: . I figured that I would just loosen the two barrel bands, and tighten them back straight. Unfortunately, the screw head on the front barrel band, apparently being made of paper mache, has stripped. I used a properly fitting 5mm hollow ground screwdriver, but still managed to start mangling the head. Now what? I hate to send it back for a warranty repair for something that should be a quick fix.

 

I'm going to go shoot it tomorrow to see how far left that it shoots. Also, to see what else might be wrong. Is it possible that they sight these in by twisting the barrel band, or is this just an example of poor quality control?

 

I might have expected this type of stuff if I had bought the lower priced Rossi, but I expect a lot more for $1,000. Sorry for the venting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had to drill out the screw on the last carbine I worked on. It was absolutely frozen in place. If the screw isn't to badly buggered at this point you can try a small impact driver like this one. http://www.harborfreight.com/7-piece-rever...-set-93481.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Buckshot,

 

Unfortunately, the front barrel band is a friction fit to the barrel with a "half notch" filed in the tube and often in the bottom of the barrel. The attachment method allows the front band to twist. Sometimes it takes a little pressure, sometimes a lot. Most of the time, the cross screw has been installed with so much torque, it won't come out and has to be drilled out from the threaded side, destroying the barrel band. Three choices. Apply heat to the barrel band, use an impact tool and cross your fingers. Drill it out from the threaded side and order a new front band and screw. Send it back. Since it's a new gun, your owed warranty. I'd suggest sending it back for warranty.

 

Coffinmaker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As with Pettifogger's post, I've had to drill out the last THREE.

 

Good Luck.

 

Coffinmaker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mine was a tad tight also when I tried to take it off.What I ended up doing was using a light hammer and tapping on the handle of the screwdriver while keeping pressure on it.It finally came loose and didn't mess up the head of the screw.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I could not remove the screw in a back-up carbine I bought. I used a small easy out which took the screw right out with no damage to the band.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One time, at a match, when the shooter restaged his carbine rifle he let it fall pretty hard on the table. The mag tube got bumped and shoved off kilter quite a bit. He just twisted it back by hand, didn't loosen any screws. Looked OK after that and didn't seem to affect anything. Maybe you could try it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
One time, at a match, when the shooter restaged his carbine rifle he let it fall pretty hard on the table. The mag tube got bumped and shoved off kilter quite a bit. He just twisted it back by hand, didn't loosen any screws. Looked OK after that and didn't seem to affect anything. Maybe you could try it.

 

I'll give this a try before I go shooting today. If it won't straighten out without removing the screw I see my options as:

 

1. Send it back for a warranty repair which would cost me shipping to them, and worst case they charge me for the screw and band since I messed up the screw. Plus I would be without the rifle for who knows how long.

 

2. Buy the parts to fix myself. I have an impact driver and an easy out, so I might be able to salvage the band. or

 

3. Upgrade to the front barrel band with the bead sight.

 

I'm leaning towards option #3 right now. I always feel better about having to spend money if I end up with something better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Doc! If I ever meet you, remind me that I owe you a beer. I was able to put a quick clamp around the barrel band and use it for enough leverage to straighten it out. It moved too far at first, and then back to where it started, but I think that I have it straight now. It is hard to tell, so it must be close.

 

Hopefully, I won't find any other issues when I go shoot it today.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Buckshot,

 

If you go with option three, Pioneer Gunworks has a real nice front band with a swell bead (big). It also includes the screw. I install them all the time. Nice product and not too expensive.

 

Coffinmaker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'll give this a try before I go shooting today. If it won't straighten out without removing the screw I see my options as:

 

1. Send it back for a warranty repair which would cost me shipping to them, and worst case they charge me for the screw and band since I messed up the screw. Plus I would be without the rifle for who knows how long.

 

2. Buy the parts to fix myself. I have an impact driver and an easy out, so I might be able to salvage the band. or

 

3. Upgrade to the front barrel band with the bead sight.

 

I'm leaning towards option #3 right now. I always feel better about having to spend money if I end up with something better.

 

 

It may be different in that bright Florida sun, but around here we shoot a lot of stages under trees or other cover. Unless you're young with eyes like a hawk, you're going to end up wanting a bead front sight for action shooting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It may be different in that bright Florida sun, but around here we shoot a lot of stages under trees or other cover. Unless you're young with eyes like a hawk, you're going to end up wanting a bead front sight for action shooting.

 

I can defenitely see the advantage of the bead instead of the post, but right now the rear sight is a bigger issue. The notch is tiny. I think that I'm going to do a little work with a file to open it up. Make it a shallow V like an express sight. Any opinions on this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To be more authentic, the front sight, beaded or otherwise, should be dovetailed behind the barrel band, and the barrel band sightless, grind it off and refinish or get a plain band. ( Someone must make them ??? )

 

Uberti and other Italian makers, in order to make screws quickly and easily and have their tooling last longer, use very soft steel for screw stock. It is difficult to get them in or out without buggering the slot, even if they aren't overtightened by the Italian Gorilla.

 

Some harder screws are available from VTIgunparts.com, perhaps that screw among them. They do sell harder screws for the lifter and lever springs, which are also impossible to remove without destroying the heads.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sunday Humor. Another option is to take the front barrel band and sight off and leave it off. Thomas Hayden Church did this in the movie "Broken Trail" and he was very accurate. Something to think about.

 

Siesta

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had the dovetailed sight on my 66 fall off at the loading table (I found it on the ground later) at a match and shot the stage with no front sight and no misses...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With regards to the rear sight, it sucks. All of my customers have requested I open the sight up and I use a 3 corner file to open it up to a "V" shape. It works very well. I have also removed the sight from the front band and dovetailed the barrel. A .510 or .520 tall front sight is required.

Once the rear sight is opened up, you'll really like a big bead.

 

Coffinmaker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have the Pioneer sight for my 45LC carbine, I used my screw since it wasn't messed up, they asked if I wanted to buy the screw and I said no, mine was still good, as for rear sight I have the full buckhorn and with the bead and full buckhorn, works good for me anyway

 

 

All for now JD Trampas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I shot my first match yesterday. The carbine shot great! I realized during the second stage that I wasn't using the sights at all. I wasn't missing, so I just went with it. I finally realized in the last stage why I wasn't using the sights. I am cross-eye dominant (left eye, right handed) and I was shooting with both eyes open meaning that my left eye was seeing the target more than my right eye was seeing the sights. This is how I shoot my AR since it has a red dot, but I have to shoot iron sights with my left eye shut. I guess in the heat of the moment, I reverted back to both eyes open. Anyways, it worked fine because I didn't have a miss all day with the rifle or shotgun. I think that I'm going to open the rear notch into a V anyways.

 

The biggest thing that I need to do now is to take it apart so that I can chamfer the frame where the rounds load. I had to straighten the last round loaded by sticking my finger through the loading port on every stage. I have two bloody fingers to prove it :). Unfortunately, the side plate screw seems to have been put in by the same gorilla that tightened the barrel band (and the screw seems to be about the same quality). I might need to use an impact driver to get it out without mangling it.

 

I bought the '73 because I figured that it would be fun to work on (lots of upgrades available), but these screws are killing me...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You have a rifle that was assembled by Bongo. Uberti's pet gorilla. Your first teardown is the worst. After that, you put the screws back in tight but not "torqued." I use an impact driver routinely for the first teardown. You may still wind up replacing several screws. The worst are the screws to the lever side springs (bottom of frame ahead of the lever). Call VTI Gunparts for replacement screws. Their cheap.

 

Coffinmaker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Coffinmaker- Thanks for the encouragement. Bongo might be stronger than me, but I outsmarted him. The impact driver and some PB Blaster did the trick. I only ruined one screw (the carrier spring screw). I've got it apart and filed the bevel on the underside of the receiver wall to fix the last round loaded jamming issue. Since you were mentioned as the one who suggested this on the website where I found this tip, I figured that I'd just ask you (anyone else is free to answer also). How large of a bevel/chamfer does it take to fix this problem? I took a couple of pictures of what I have done so far:

 

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y273/ruotolof/DSCF0077.jpg

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y273/ruotolof/DSCF0075.jpg

 

Does this look about right, or should I make the bevel larger?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks pretty good to me. It doesn't take a really huge bevel, just enough to get the cartridge rim past that back wall. Before you put it back together, the lever spring and the lifter spring do not fit the curve of the frame at the front. They will "cock" funny to the frame when you reassemble. At the back of the spring, file the back edge to a nice even radius to match the frame before you put 'em back in. Eventually, your going to replace them because they are too heavy. I'd suggest "SlixSprings" from Pioneer Gunworks. The lighter springs will also extend the life of the internal working parts. Well worth the investment.

 

Coffinmaker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Looks pretty good to me. It doesn't take a really huge bevel, just enough to get the cartridge rim past that back wall. Before you put it back together, the lever spring and the lifter spring do not fit the curve of the frame at the front. They will "cock" funny to the frame when you reassemble. At the back of the spring, file the back edge to a nice even radius to match the frame before you put 'em back in. Eventually, your going to replace them because they are too heavy. I'd suggest "SlixSprings" from Pioneer Gunworks. The lighter springs will also extend the life of the internal working parts. Well worth the investment.

 

Coffinmaker

 

Thanks for your help. I'm just going to order the SlixSprings since I need to replace the screw anyways and it comes with hardened screws.

 

Do I also need to shorten the magazine spring, or will this bevel alone correct the issue?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.