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A Culinary Conundrum


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The directions for assembling this have me baffled. Plus, why call this bread a cake?  I think that something was lost in the translation.  But it sounds right tasty.  I put the part that has me puzzled in red.

Spinach and Feta Cake

 

 

Quote

Ingredients

For the filling

  • 1 spring onion
  • 3-4 tablespoon(s) olive oil
  • 1 onion
  • 1 clove(s) of garlic
  • salt
  • pepper
  • 1/4 bunch mint
  • 1 tablespoon(s) oregano
  • 1/4 bunch dill
  • 500 g spinach

For the dough

  • 250 g milk
  • 18 g yeast
  • 400 g all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon(s) granulated sugar
  • salt
  • 75 g butter, ice-cold

To assemble

  • 200 g feta cheese
  • 2 tablespoon(s) olive oil
  • lemon zest, of 1 lemon
  • pepper

For the filling

  • Place a frying pan over high heat and add the olive oil.
  • Cut the white part of the spring onion into small rounds, the onion into small pieces, the garlic into thin slices, and add them to the pan.
  • Finely chop the stems of the dill and add them to the pan. Add salt, pepper, and sauté them for 1-2 minutes.
  • Finely chop the rest of the dill, mint, oregano, and the green part of the spring onion, and set them aside.
  • Add the spinach to the pan, crushed with your hands, and sauté it over medium heat for 10-12 minutes, until wilted.
  • Remove from the heat and add the herbs you had set aside. Mix and let the filling cool.

For the dough

  • In a mixer’s bowl add the milk, the yeast, and mix with a hand whisk.
  • Add the flour, sugar, salt, the butter cut into cubes, and beat with the hook attachment at medium-high speed for 10 minutes.
  • Transfer the dough to a greased bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and let it double in size. 

To assemble

  • Roll out your dough into a 30x40 cm sheet and spread the filling over its whole surface.
  • Spread the feta cheese crushed with your hands, the lemon zest, pepper, and wrap into a roll, starting from the larger side.
  • Cut in half, starting from the one edge and make sure you do not cut the other edge in order to have a single roll.
  • Braid the two halves and stick the two edges together. Transfer to a floured and greased 28 cm Bundt pan and drizzle with 1 tablespoon olive oil.
  • Cover with plastic wrap and let the cake rise for 1 hour.
  • Preheat the oven to 170ο C (340ο F) set to fan.
  • Bake it for 1 hour.
  • Let it cool and serve.



Spinach and feta cake



 

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Roll out. Put filling on top. Fold over. Seal edge. Score through top and filling but not bottom dough. Twist. Bundt pan 

 

The image shows 2 triangle of dough. One edge is continuous the other is split. 

Not sure how you would braid 2 strands but looks like a twist

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22 minutes ago, Texas Joker said:

Roll out. Put filling on top. Fold over. Seal edge. Score through top and filling but not bottom dough. Twist. Bundt pan 

 

The image shows 2 triangle of dough. One edge is continuous the other is split. 

Not sure how you would braid 2 strands but looks like a twist

 

I see it as roll rather than just fold.  Then score through all layers except the bottom.  But the "braid the two halves and stick the two edges together" still baffles me.  As you said, how do you braid two? And "stick the two edges together" I take as butting the ends together in the pan. Plus a square bundt pan is weird.

 

 

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For kicks I copied your section in red and used the whole statement as a search in DDG. 

 

The first result was the site with your recipe above. 
 

The second was this:

https://greencamp.com/how-to-roll-a-joint/
 

Suggest you use the one I found, then make your recipe as you see fit then enjoy. :lol:

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From text in the picture, I suspect the recipe is translated. I think it is greek.

 

Plus metric measurements... Oh, and oven set to fan? Probably for a convection oven. But the time seems long.

 

Bundt pan likely meaning a ring pan, so close enough to a US bundt pan.

 

28 cm pan. 40 cm long rollup... 28 X pi is about 90... so cutting the rolled dough lengthwise, opening the two halves so now 80 cm long, pinching the long edge shut as best possible, and stretching a bit... it would go around once... Agree this does not make sense as written.

 

But then "braiding" could be the result of translating some word to mean put it in around the pan? Along with twisting it so it looks something like the picture?

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30 minutes ago, John Kloehr said:

. I think it is greek.

 

If you follow the link you see that the language options are Greek and English.

 

On the other hand, I could just roll it slash the top a little, or not, and bake it.  The whole split, twist, bake in a Bundt pan seems mostly for presentation.

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Found the Greek toggle button, then ran the greek through google translate.

 

"Cut in half starting from one end and make sure not to cut the other end to have a stable joint."

 

So now about 80 cm long.

 

As to the word "πλεξούδα", it can be "braid" but it can also be "strand." In either case, it is considered a noun (but used here as a verb?). But my Greek is pretty bad, my only knowledge of it is from digging into the NT during a quarter-long class in college.

 

 

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21 minutes ago, Subdeacon Joe said:

 

If you follow the link you see that the language options are Greek and English.

 

On the other hand, I could just roll it slash the top a little, or not, and bake it.  The whole split, twist, bake in a Bundt pan seems mostly for presentation.

Also with the cuts, the bundt pan will contain the stuffing seepage.

 

This recipe is very close to Spanakopita, with a bread dough instead of Phyllo.

 

Probably would work by folding in half, pinching the edges well, and baking it.

 

Or cut the dough into several pieces before stuffing and make it into turnovers.

 

This discussion is making me hungry but I have no spinach on hand.

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I was thinking a savory cross between a jelly roll and a butterbraid.

 

Really Long twisted tortellini? 

 

It's a slice and eat sandwich. 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, John Kloehr said:

Also with the cuts, the bundt pan will contain the stuffing seepage.

 

This recipe is very close to Spanakopita, with a bread dough instead of Phyllo.

 

Probably would work by folding in half, pinching the edges well, and baking it.

 

Or cut the dough into several pieces before stuffing and make it into turnovers.

 

This discussion is making me hungry but I have no spinach on hand.

 

Looking at it I don't think that there would be much seepage.

 

Spinach and feta are a classic combination.  My first thought was the same, spanikopita bread.

 

A very play-withable concept.  Heck, use wonton skins or egg roll wrappers.

 

Edited by Subdeacon Joe
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