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.58 Springfield load


Black Angus McPherson

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OK, I know load data isn't allowed to be posted on the sass wire, but I was hoping someone could PM me with the Black Powder charge commonly loaded into the .58 caliber paper cartridges of the Civil War era.

 

I was thinking it was 70 grains ffg (can I say that here? I guess it'll be deleted if not) then I started thinking about the .45-70 cartridge and began second guessing myself.

 

So, if someone here could set me straight on this I'd appreciate it. It's gotten me really curious.

 

Thanks,

 

Black Angus McPherson

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I was thinking closer to 60grs

 

GG ~ :FlagAm:

Me too. I did shoot 45 FFg grains when I was skirmishing with the CWSA.

It was very accurate out to 100 yards. That was the distance of the targets.

Also, that was a British Enfield. Both Springfield and Enfield were very similar.

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The factory accepted load (according to the arsenal data) was 70 gr of "musket powder". That granulation was a finer 1f of today. I have had the privilege of disassembling a few original paper ctgs, and was able to ascertain the make-up of them. They contained a lubed minie' ball, a paper powder cup that held the charge, and the charge itself, and as I said, it was courser than todays 2F. All this in a nose tied, and "tail crimped" end. Original Enfield ctgs were much more sophisticated, and used a .577 Pritchet bullet, that wasn't lubed and had no grease grooves, as the bullet was loaded with the paper wrap, that contained a lube.

There is a whole slew of info on just the ammo of the Great Rebellion. Good cold weather reading.

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I very actively hunted with an H&R .58 carbine replica in the 1980s.

Lee 515-grain #2 Federal bullet, hollow-base, 100% lead

55-grains of FFg recommended by Sam Fadala/Lyman book. (60-grains in full-length musket)

I kept shots under 150 yards where the gun/load shot 5" groups POA.

I recovered some bullets shot with 75 grains that had the hollowbase skirts blown away from the bullet. There is a sweet spot in loading these bullets.

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Just enough to open the bullet skirt and make it fit the rifling. Too much and the skirt will blow open as the bullet leaves the muzzle. This load was used by soldiers who might fire 100 rounds in a long battle.

Once that 515 grain bullet gets up to 1100 fps it keeps its velocity pretty well.

This is equal to a 20-gage slug over 2-1/4 drams of powder.

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