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Wild Will Bartell

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From my oilskin duster? Got some on it whilst carrying steel targets back to the storage shed. I don't want to use mineral spirits for fear that they will ruin the water repellant properties of the duster. Any suggestions?

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From my oilskin duster? Got some on it whilst carrying steel targets back to the storage shed. I don't want to use mineral spirits for fear that they will ruin the water repellant properties of the duster. Any suggestions?

 

Other than getting someone else to carry the stuff for ya?? No.

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Do what you must to clean the paint off.

 

Next, order up some of this stuff.

 

Then:

 

1) Clean your coat by soaking it in a bath tub or laundry basin of cold water - add a cap full of a mild liquid detergent (one that is suitable for woollen garments). Agitate the water for a few minutes and then allow the coat to soak overnight. Then rinse out your coat with fresh water. It is very important to remove all dust before applying the dressing. If you do not remove dust, the dressing will stick to any dust remaining; when the dust dislodges it will leave tiny holes in the fabric exposed, which will leak.

 

2) Allow the coat to dry naturally.

 

3) Wait for a very hot day to re-oil: the hotter the day, the better the results. Place the coat in bright sunshine and allow it to heat up. Heat the garment dressing until it turns to liquid – this can be done by putting the can of dressing in the sun or a saucepan of hot water. At the hottest time of the day, sparingly apply the dressing to the coat, using a clean cloth. Add a little extra dressing to the seams. The sun will spread the dressing evenly and quickly through the coat fabric.

 

4) If you do not have a suitable climate then you will need a hand-held hair drier to work the dressing into the cloth.

 

5) Your coat will now be ready to give you full protection.

 

Now, for some fun history... :rolleyes:

 

 

In the 1890's, a Scottish sailor named Edward Le Roy who voyaged across the great southern oceans, discovered that the torn sails on his ship could be recycled into long coats and sou'westers (a seaman's weather-proof hat) by painting the canvas material with a mixture of oils. This transformed them into excellent wet weather gear. The word on the land spread about the effectiveness of Le Roy's coats in the wet and Australia's squatters and settlers soon adopted them. The coat was adapted to life on the land by adding a fantail to protect the seat of the horse rider's saddle, leg straps to keep the coat from taking off in strong winds, and extra-long sleeves to protect the wearer when his arms were extended. The coats were so effective and useful for many, that they eventually became known as Driza-Bones, named after the dried and scorched bones of animals in the arid Australian Outback. ^_^

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Do what you must to clean the paint off.

 

Next, order up some of this stuff.

 

Then:

 

1) Clean your coat by soaking it in a bath tub or laundry basin of cold water - add a cap full of a mild liquid detergent (one that is suitable for woollen garments). Agitate the water for a few minutes and then allow the coat to soak overnight. Then rinse out your coat with fresh water. It is very important to remove all dust before applying the dressing. If you do not remove dust, the dressing will stick to any dust remaining; when the dust dislodges it will leave tiny holes in the fabric exposed, which will leak.

 

2) Allow the coat to dry naturally.

 

3) Wait for a very hot day to re-oil: the hotter the day, the better the results. Place the coat in bright sunshine and allow it to heat up. Heat the garment dressing until it turns to liquid – this can be done by putting the can of dressing in the sun or a saucepan of hot water. At the hottest time of the day, sparingly apply the dressing to the coat, using a clean cloth. Add a little extra dressing to the seams. The sun will spread the dressing evenly and quickly through the coat fabric.

 

4) If you do not have a suitable climate then you will need a hand-held hair drier to work the dressing into the cloth.

 

5) Your coat will now be ready to give you full protection.

 

Now, for some fun history... :rolleyes:

 

 

In the 1890's, a Scottish sailor named Edward Le Roy who voyaged across the great southern oceans, discovered that the torn sails on his ship could be recycled into long coats and sou'westers (a seaman's weather-proof hat) by painting the canvas material with a mixture of oils. This transformed them into excellent wet weather gear. The word on the land spread about the effectiveness of Le Roy's coats in the wet and Australia's squatters and settlers soon adopted them. The coat was adapted to life on the land by adding a fantail to protect the seat of the horse rider's saddle, leg straps to keep the coat from taking off in strong winds, and extra-long sleeves to protect the wearer when his arms were extended. The coats were so effective and useful for many, that they eventually became known as Driza-Bones, named after the dried and scorched bones of animals in the arid Australian Outback. ^_^

 

Thanks a heap, Hardpan. I'm going to take your advice, although I'm going to have to wait quite a while for some hot weather around here. I guess I could borrow my girlfriend's hair dryer as long as I don't tell her what it's for...

 

Thanks also for the history lesson. BTW, the name/maker of my coat is in fact Driza-Bone.

 

:)

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I had the seats recovered in my pickup with cloth seats. The guy that did the work told me to use lacquer thinner to remove ant stains that got on it. He said that that's what they use at a lot of dry cleaners and it won't harm most fabric or turn the color. I've since used it on several cloth items that someone (usually me) spilt stuff on. I would try it in a spot that don't show first, but it might be worth a try.

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If it is just a few spots and smudges, why worry? Can be pretty sure that our ancestors got paint on their dusters too.

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If it is just a few spots and smudges, why worry? Can be pretty sure that our ancestors got paint on their dusters too.

 

And blood.

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Lighter fluid and a stiff brush :D

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And blood.

And dust, and dung, and...and...and.

 

Funny that people will post things like "I got a new hat...now how do I make it look like I've been wearing it for 20 years? Without wearing it, I mean." But any other gear that would get hard wear doesn't get the same treatment.

 

 

Lighter fluid and a stiff brush :D

 

Lighter fluid and a match? :rolleyes:

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Points well taken fellas; I'm sure our ancestors got plenty of work related stuff on their dusters. I do however wear mine outside of CAS circles. A fella can't go to the local saloon on a Friday night with paint stains on his duster now can he??

 

;)

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And blood.

Oh, my gosh Yellowhouse you are a hoot.. lol.. But it's the truth.. lol.l Still funny.

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