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Winchester 1897


Captain Action, SASS #70709

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...with a recently aquired, well-worn 1897 "E" model w/30" barrel manufactured in 1913. (I will not be cutting the barrel!) I'm putting together a parts list and need some advice with a problem. Once in every 20 or so cycles, the hammer follows the bolt forward. Worn sear?? Any help would be appreciated.

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Perhaps, but could also be that the main spring is adjusted too light with the tension screw, or the main spring is weak. See if you can tighten the main spring tension screw a little.

Could also be the main notch on the hammer cut too thin to hold reliably.

 

Good luck, GJ

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...with a recently aquired, well-worn 1897 "E" model w/30" barrel manufactured in 1913. (I will not be cutting the barrel!) I'm putting together a parts list and need some advice with a problem. Once in every 20 or so cycles, the hammer follows the bolt forward. Worn sear?? Any help would be appreciated.

 

If like you say it's well worn, most likely the bolt and frame rails are so worn the bolt is riding up as it comes back. Riding up so much that it won't push the hammer down enough to cock. If that is the problem a new sear will only make it worse. The action needs to be tightened up some. You have to grow or add some metal where needed to do this.

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If like you say it's well worn, most likely the bolt and frame rails are so worn the bolt is riding up as it comes back. Riding up so much that it won't push the hammer down enough to cock. If that is the problem a new sear will only make it worse. The action needs to be tightened up some. You have to grow or add some metal where needed to do this.
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As per GJ's advice, I tightened the mainspring tension screw. Helped a bit (1 in 50 odd cycles now), but Nate's correct unfortunately. The receiver rails and top of the hammer are worn. Believe I'll use it for an occasional BP bird hunt and get something else for CAS. Thanks for the help. (This is why I love The Wire!)

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  • 2 months later...

If like you say it's well worn, most likely the bolt and frame rails are so worn the bolt is riding up as it comes back. Riding up so much that it won't push the hammer down enough to cock. If that is the problem a new sear will only make it worse. The action needs to be tightened up some. You have to grow or add some metal where needed to do this.

 

Sounds like I have a similar problem - the amount of build-up is just .001s of an inch, is there anything I'd need to be mindful of after growing metal in those two tracks?

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If like you say it's well worn, most likely the bolt and frame rails are so worn the bolt is riding up as it comes back. Riding up so much that it won't push the hammer down enough to cock. If that is the problem a new sear will only make it worse. The action needs to be tightened up some. You have to grow or add some metal where needed to do this.

 

Howdy Nate - In reading this thread, it made me think of other guns with "slop" in the action. If I recall correctly there's a trick with the 1911 that involves squeezing down the slide to make it ride a bit tighter on the frame. Could the receiver on a 97 be pushed in a bit to take up the slack between the bolt and frame rails?

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Yes, you could build up the hammer a bit, but it would make the action a little harder to work and would make the gun wear even more.

Some folks would "re-arbor" the frame to help. I've heard others used plating (such as nickle plating the gun) to help. Not sure how Nate was meaning to do it.

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Not sure how Nate was meaning to do it.

Could be a plasma metallizing shop down the street from Nate- using equipment and spray metal like this (commonly done on marine equipment rebuilds)?

http://www.plasmapowders.com/

 

Good luck, GJ

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Seven has the easiest fix.

 

Shorten the sear bar on the hammer end.

 

Ol' #4

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Shorten the sear to raise the hammer. Once cocked, keep the overtravel to a minimum.

 

That's the quickest fix but you gotta be real careful. If you take too much the action gets really stiff because the hammer is now rubbing the bottom of the bolt all the time. Next option is to add a little metal to the bottom of the bolt there at the back end.

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