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Trigger Mike

how to value original 1873 rifles

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I have an original 1873 rifle.  The serial number puts it around 1875.  How do I determine value so I can sell it?

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Howdy, 

Just put it on Gunbroker with noreserve and no buy now price.

Let the market answer your question.

Does that make sense?

Best

CR

ps take a lot of good pix in perfect focus.

and mention it to us......

 

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You can get a general idea from the Blue Book of Gun Values. To get a more exact value you would have to pay an appraiser.

 

From my copy of BBoGV


 

Quote

 

        GRADING EXPLANATION FOR WINCHESTER LEVER ACTIONS

A combination of grading systems is being used exclusively for Winchester Models 1873 and 1876 in this section to assist the reader in ascertaining the value of a particular specimen more accurately. They work as follows - the top pricing line contains three value ranges (Above Average, Average, or Below Average) which have been created to encompass most of the specimens commonly encountered within these models.
Since there is a drastic value difference between 95%-50% bright blue and 30% dull patina/fading finish on older Winchesters, a traditional grading/value line has been included to give you examples of values from 100% down to 10% providing you a better perspective of the top end of the marketplace.
The three value groupings include "Below Average," "Average," and "Above Average" condition factors. These value ranges indicate the following conditions:

BELOW AVERAGE VALUE RANGE - a specimen with no finish remaining, perhaps some parts have been replaced, deteriorated metal may be lightly pitted with faint barrel/frame markings, rounded edges of wood and metal, wood showing much wear with possible repairs or cracks, must be in working order.
AVERAGE VALUE RANGE - a specimen with all original parts, exhibits gun metal patina finish, metal mostly smooth (perhaps lightly pitted), principal lettering and markings legible throughout, wood showing honest wear with little finish remaining (may have small cracks and other imperfections), good working order.
ABOVE AVERAGE VALUE RANGE - a specimen featuring unpolished brass (on Henrys and Model 1866s) or plum brown patina with traces of bluing in protected areas (on all steel frame models), sharp corners, crisp barrel markings, traces of original finish remaining, metal should exhibit nice patina or older flaking finish, wood should have some original stock varnish remaining and minor handling marks and dings, good bore, perfect working order with no replacement parts.
VALUES FOR 10%-100% CONDITION FACTORS - this includes the entire range of condition factors from 10% - 100% in many cases. N/As indicate that the condition factor is so infrequently encountered, it does not have a value. Normally, below average value ranges will approximately correspond to the 0%-10% pricing line values, average value range represents 10%-20%, and above average can range from 20%-40%, depending on the model. Typically, over 50% refers to a rifle which exhibits over 30% bright bluing/case colors or unpolished brass on the frame.
See PPGS for percentage grading examples.

 

 

 

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Model 1873 First Model Rifle

serial numbers approx. 1-30,000, sliding thumbprint dust cover on 2 guides which are an integral part of upper frame, absence of any cal. marking.

 

Percentage values listed above are for original guns with corresponding percentages of bright blue finish remaining (refer to PPGS for accurate grading).

Historic Prices

Grading

100%       98%       95%        90%     80%      70%      60%     50%    40%      30%         20%    10%

N/A         N/A       $15,000 $12,000 $9,000 $7,500 $5,500 $4,000 $3,750 $3,500 $2,750 $2,000

 

A below average Model 1873 First Model Rifle is currently valued in the $900-$1,650 range.
An average Model 1873 First Model Rifle is currently valued in the $1,650-$2,500 range.
An above average Model 1873 First Model Rifle is currently valued in the $2,500-$3,500 range.

 

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Model 1873 Carbine First Model

20 in. round barrel with carbine style forearm band. Distinctive curved buttplate, with saddle ring.

 

Percentage values listed above are for original guns with corresponding percentages of bright blue finish remaining (refer to PPGS for accurate grading).

 

Grading

100%  98%  95%          90%          80%        70%      60%      50%         40%        30%    20%    10%

N/A   N/A     $25,000 $22,000 $18,000 $15,000 $12,000 $9,000 $6,000 $5,000 $4,000 $3,000

 

A below average Model 1873 Carbine First Model is currently valued in the $1,100-$2,100 range.
An average Model 1873 Carbine First Model is currently valued in the $2,500-$3,500 range.
An above average Model 1873 Carbine First Model is currently valued in the $3,500-$5,000 range.

 

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Winchester made a lot of different barrel lengths, with some being rarer than others. Originality of condition and remaining finish are also huge factors. Throw in all the variables and anywhere from 2-5K could be fair for a well cared for original gun with no major special features but also no major cosmetic damage, just honest wear.  Some special guns with provenance would cost more than my car

 

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Howdy,

Years back a fella couldn't get a decent price for his old Winchester.

either a 66 or 73....I forget.

So he took it apart and took pix of the parts and sold the parts on ebay.

He totaled up some 3 grand plus.  

It is hard getting some imaginary estimated value.

I went to a big gun show with a friend who was trying to get a fair value

on an old Winchester.  What a lot of doubletalk. A real waste of time and energy.

That's why I suggested just sell it and let the market decide.

Real dollars are different from someones guess.

Best

CR

good luck.

 

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10 hours ago, Chili Ron said:

Howdy,

Years back a fella couldn't get a decent price for his old Winchester.

either a 66 or 73....I forget.

So he took it apart and took pix of the parts and sold the parts on ebay.

He totaled up some 3 grand plus.  

It is hard getting some imaginary estimated value.

I went to a big gun show with a friend who was trying to get a fair value

on an old Winchester.  What a lot of doubletalk. A real waste of time and energy.

That's why I suggested just sell it and let the market decide.

Real dollars are different from someones guess.

Best

CR

good luck.

 

 

Collectable firearms will only bring collectors prices if you are selling them to serious collectors AND you can intelligently defend the price you are asking.  Very few gun shows attract more than 1 or 2 serious collectors and they will only pay collector prices if you truly know what you are selling and they want to add it to their collection.

 

True fact; auction prices are the result of what at least TWO people are willing to pay. If one was willing to pay twice as much than the other guy you still only get the lower price.

 

If you want to sell it as a collectors firearm take it to a sale/auction where multiple collectors will be in attendance and pay for a true appraisal. Then know that the likelyhood of you actually getting the appraised value is not very good.

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I have an original.   In good condition , . . bore a 7 out of 10 possible.  Good wood that is Winchester wood but not original,  decent worn finish on metal,  several "extras" from the factory . . ie.  octagon barrel & extra long 26 in., flat top rear sight and blade ( rocky mountain) front sight.  I got it a few years back for $ 1,500.  If that helps you any. 

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